Please help identify this fish. Lamprologus.x

Frank the Fish guy

Member
I have a pair of Lamprlogus fish. The two fish that are low, stay on the bottom in the video. They are in my Lake T. tank along with some Neo-Lamprologous Brachardi. I do know that the are Lamprologus, I just don't know which species.

Can anyone help me id this pair please?




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Best Answer - View MacZ's answer

MacZ

Member
Could be Lamprologus werneri from the Congo. Or something similar, there is a whole group, but I'm not tooo familiar with them. Definitely none of the Tanganyicans. They move like Steatocranus.
 
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Frank the Fish guy

Member
Werneri, hmm that might be it. They do seem to completely lack any hint of a humped head as in Steatocranus .

As you can see, the two get along well. Sometimes friendly chasing around, other times hanging out closely together. one seems to follow the other. I wonder if this is a bonded pair. Would love to make some baby fish.
 

chromedome52

Member
I think it is closer to L. congoensis. There are a couple of other possibilities, and they are all grey with dark markings.

I would say they are still too young to breed.
 
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Frank the Fish guy

Member
Sometimes the vertical strips get very dark and pronounced. They look like different fish. Then other times the stripes are faded.
 
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Frank the Fish guy

Member
I was in contact with the breeder today, and they confirmed for me that this fish is

lamprologus werneri



The species is identified as threatened in the wild. I am hoping I have a breeding pair. So we'll see if I can make more and keep the Werneri party going!

They told me that this is a lake Tanganyican fish.

There seems to be different info regarding these guys home.

I have in in a Tanganyican tank. They seem happy there.

If anyone knows any more info I would appreciate it.
 

MacZ

Member
Fishbase (Stating collection points close to the mouth of the river into the Atlantic Ocean) and some other sources say Congo River and I concurr, as the way they move is a clear indication of many species living in the rapids of the Congo River. If those were from Lake Tanganyika I'd be very surprised.

You should take a look at the description at Fishbase. If you feel it's enough, think about building a rapids biotope. They would need less hard water in that case.

 
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