Platy Needs Help! Please Help Asap

Joseph28

Hello everyone I really do hope somebody sees this and can help me figure out what’s going on... I have a green lantern platy and i’ve had her for a couple weeks, in fact she was the first fish to ever go in my tank but these past few days i’ve been noticing some weird behavior. She swims perfectly and has no problems doing what she wants but what I have been noticing is that she’s been floating at the top of the tank and staying there with no desire to move. Usually whenever all my fish see me they come to me because they want food and so does my green lantern but lately she just floats around from corner to corner or remains under this rock I have in my tank. She’s eating fine but I have to put the food right next to her or else she won't really make an effort to get it (not today at least) There seems to be nothing wrong with the tank or other fish and I have tested the water. The water’s perfectly fine. She seems to have clamped her fins a couple hours ago and she won't stop clamping them unless she wants to swim around. Can somebody please help me and my green lantern out?

Also i’m not sure if this will help but I do believe that she was the one that gave birth to 5 fry. She gave birth to them Tuesday Morning
 

Attachments

  • 71E7EA90-D8D5-47D8-9D53-261F51533BEB.jpeg
    71E7EA90-D8D5-47D8-9D53-261F51533BEB.jpeg
    63.5 KB · Views: 73

richiep

Are the scales raised,? Picture looks as if they maybe
 

Joseph28

Are the scales raised,? Picture looks as if they maybe
From what I can see up close, no. I startled her by taking this picture but this is how she looks when she’s swimming around and not floating. I took this picture right after I read your message so hopefully it’s better quality. The scales look identical to my other female green lantern in my tank.
 

Attachments

  • image.jpg
    image.jpg
    77.4 KB · Views: 65

richiep

Hopefully some will join in with a bit more knowledge, the only other thing I can think of is there a good aeriation in the tank, it may be worth putting your water perameters on here as well

Sorry Rtessy posted just as you did
 

Joseph28

The temperature is 79 degree Fahrenheit, I got my fish march 18th, my newest addition is march 21st.
Ammonia is 0.50 ppm
Nitrate is 0 ppm
Nitrite is 0.25 ppm

Hopefully some will join in with a bit more knowledge, the only other thing I can think of is there a good aeriation in the tank, it may be worth putting your water perameters on here as well
The water perameters are now up, thank you so much Richie!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

WinterSoldier.

Its the ammonia. Try doing a large water change.
The temperature is 79 degree Fahrenheit, I got my fish march 18th, my newest addition is march 21st.
Ammonia is 0.50 ppm
Nitrate is 0 ppm
Nitrite is 0.25 ppm
 

Joseph28

Its the ammonia. Try doing a large water change.
I’m honestly a bit scared to do a water change because I changed the water a couple of days ago, do you think it would still be safe?
 

Rtessy

I’m honestly a bit scared to do a water change because I changed the water a couple of days ago, do you think it would still be safe?
Why are you afraid to change the water? You've got a dechlorinator, right?
 

Joseph28

Why are you afraid to change the water? You've got a dechlorinator, right?
Yes I do, I have the tap water conditioner from apI but I was just a bit scared because from what i’ve been told it’s unsafe to change it often but I will do it now
 

richiep

Your profile says you don't know the nitrogen cycle, and she was the first fish to go in a few weeks ago so give some information on how long the tank as been running the size, how many fish in there
 

Joseph28

It has been running since the 20th, it’s a 15 gallon tank and there are 8 fish in there
 

coralbandit

Not cycled .
Get comfortable changing water ,and learn how to properly.
The % you remove is the % the nutrient will be reduced.
Match temperature and dechlorinate .
I raise 'sensitive ' fish and the more water I change the better they get .I do multiple changes per week and some as large as 90% followed that same day with another 50%..
Do your water changes right and your fish will thank you .
 

Joseph28

Not cycled .
Get comfortable changing water ,and learn how to properly.
The % you remove is the % the nutrient will be reduced.
Match temperature and dechlorinate .
I raise 'sensitive ' fish and the more water I change the better they get .I do multiple changes per week and some as large as 90% followed that same day with another 50%..
Do your water changes right and your fish will thank you .
Got you! Thank you so much, I will more than likely update on how the situation goes. You guys are amazing!
 

WinterSoldier.

I’m honestly a bit scared to do a water change because I changed the water a couple of days ago, do you think it would still be safe?

Scared? Mmmm...well a water change is the BEST thing to do! So don't hesitate!
 

AZL

Hey, I'm a noob myself but have had loads of good advice, much of it on here. I had to do a fish in cycle as a tank and its residents were re-homed with me about two months ago and it's been a steep learning curve as the little guys are depending on me to get my head around this all fast enough to avoid making them sick or killing them. The other far more experienced fish keepers who have responded already are quite right, water changes will help now and keep things going well in the future but I know it's daunting to work out how much and how often. Everyone says differently - anything between every couple of days or even daily to fortnightly to rarely. As it's a small tank the water pollutes more quickly and changes to water perimeters will affect the fish more quickly than in a larger tank. The consensus generally seems to be change more frequently, weekly going forward give or take a couple of days either way depending on how polluted the water gets. For right now I personally would do a 30% change (4.5 gallons), if things settle do another 20% (3 gallons) in a week and if not another 20% in a couple of days and then again weekly from when you get a 0 reading for ammonia. My tank is just coming out of a big spike and I used this strategy to balance between the advice of doing huge daily changes and the opposing advice of letting things settle on their own to allow the cycle to stabilise. Treat the water with a double dose of Seachem Prime and Seachem Stability right away and then continue the Prime daily until it goes back to 0 ammonia and the Stability for a week. When you do water changes going forward put the recommended amount in the water. This means for now you detoxify the ammonia with the Prime so it doesn't hurt your fish and bolster the nitrating bacteria with Stability to allow the cycle to level out. Adding Prime to the fresh water for ongoing maintenance removes chlorine and adding Stability keeps the bacteria colonies strong. Lovely platy in any case, I haven't seen one of those before!
 
Last edited:

Joseph28

DFB15E72-8B0A-4444-B27E-B5751088A2B4.jpeg
Hey, I'm a noob myself but have had loads of good advice, much of it on here. I had to do a fish in cycle as a tank and its residents were re-homed with me about two months ago and it's been a steep learning curve as the little guys are depending on me to get my head around this all fast enough to avoid making them sick or killing them. The other far more experienced fish keepers who have responded already are quite right, water changes will help now and keep things going well in the future but I know it's daunting to work out how much and how often. Everyone says differently - anything between every couple of days or even daily to fortnightly to rarely. As it's a small tank the water pollutes more quickly and changes to water perimeters will affect the fish more quickly than in a larger tank. The consensus generally seems to be change more frequently, weekly going forward give or take a couple of days either way depending on how polluted the water gets. For right now I personally would do a 30% change (4.5 gallons), if things settle do another 20% (3 gallons) in a week and if not another 20% in a couple of days and then again weekly from when you get a 0 reading for ammonia. My tank is just coming out of a big spike and I used this strategy to balance between the advice of doing huge daily changes and the opposing advice of letting things settle on their own to allow the cycle to stabilise. Treat the water with a double dose of Seachem Prime and Seachem Stability right away and then continue the Prime daily until it goes back to 0 ammonia and the Stability for a week. When you do water changes going forward put the recommended amount in the water. This means for now you detoxify the ammonia with the Prime so it doesn't hurt your fish and bolster the nitrating bacteria with Stability to allow the cycle to level out. Adding Prime to the fresh water for ongoing maintenance removes chlorine and adding Stability keeps the bacteria colonies strong. Lovely platy in any case, I haven't seen one of those before!
Thank you so much! I really appreciate your advice! I have changed a ton of things from my tank so I can finally update everyone. This past week I decided to upgrade their tank completely. I went from a 15 gallon tank to a 37 gallon tank. At first my fish were scared and not acting right due to stress but they have been adapting nicely. After buying the tank I decided to buy 3 dwarf gouramis and they have actually been very nice and a perfect fit for my tank. There has been no fighting and no problems whatsoever BUT just a few minutes ago I woke up to turn on the tank light and I found something terrifying. One Gourami is dead and I have no clue why. Yesterday it was eating well and showed no signs of stress or anything and he even seemed to be the healthiest gourami in my tank but today he’s floating and dead. I also found something on one of my green lantern platies (not the one this thread is about but another one). It appears to be a bite mark of some sort but I have no clue what did it. I have 1 black molly, 1 spotted molly, 2 gold twinbar platy, 1 sunburst platy, 1 red wag platies, 2 other platies, 1 albino pleco that is about 2 inches, and my blue dwarf Gourami and now only one red gourami. What could have caused this? Because I am terrified.
 

Rtessy

What kind of gourami are they all? What type was the one that died?
Sorry for your loss
And how are your parameters looking at them moment?
 

Joseph28

I’m going to send the pictures of the gourami right now. The one that died is the same type as the red one and then I will send the parameters

Parameters are
Ammonia - 0 PPM
Nitrite - .25 PPM
Nitrate - 0 PPM
 

Attachments

  • B7AE54BD-E983-4F47-9146-3B78549E32CD.jpeg
    B7AE54BD-E983-4F47-9146-3B78549E32CD.jpeg
    111.4 KB · Views: 47
  • FD5286B7-7795-472E-97F6-25BDCEF2E715.jpeg
    FD5286B7-7795-472E-97F6-25BDCEF2E715.jpeg
    65.9 KB · Views: 48
Last edited by a moderator:

AZL

Again, new to this myself so more experienced forum uses will be able to go into more depth but as I understand it while nitrates are not a problem at low levels nitrite is more toxic than ammonia. I'd do a decent water change and dose heavily (at least double, maybe three or four times the standard) with Seachem Prime to detoxify and keep dosing until both ammonia and nitrite are 0. As you upgraded the tank and moved the fish unless you did a complete fishless cycle first it's still in process. Reading 0 nitrates means the cycle is not yet stable and the bacteria colonies are immature. I would also dose with Stability or another reputable live bacteria source, some straight into the filter as well as in the water, with a big starter dose and then the recommended maintenance dose (daily for a week if Prime, Microbe-Lift is a smaller maintenance dose weekly for awhile). It's tricky stuff, I've literally just managed to get the freshwater community re-homed with me three months ago stable as the previous owners power washed the filter killing the bacteria colonies and it's been hard to re-establish them with fish in the tank and required constant monitoring to ensure as water perimeters fluctuate I'm able to respond immediately to avoid fish becoming sick or dying. I'm currently cycling a FOWLR marine tank for GSP's being re-homed with me but fortunately they're ok for a bit where they are so I won't be bringing them home until the cycle is stable.
 

Joseph28

Hey everyone I really hope this message will pop up for you all because once again i’m finding something wrong in my tank‍♂️ I was watching my fish and I noticed this white spot on my platy... Does anybody know what that could be? It seems like peeled skin and well my males seem to be aggressive towards my females, not in a way where they would want to mate but in a way to chase them away and peck at them/raise their fins in a mode that seems like they’re ready to fight. They’re only going after one of the 10 females in the tank. I have 3 male platy and the males are all fighting each other. I don’t understand why only chase after one female and treat the other female as male competitors. Any advice?
 

Attachments

  • 32419EED-B096-4DD1-B863-1A684C2CF6AA.jpeg
    32419EED-B096-4DD1-B863-1A684C2CF6AA.jpeg
    82.4 KB · Views: 44

Rtessy

More sight breaks and decorations, I've got the same issue with one of my Platies, they'll only chase one out of four females.
As for the white, the little patch on the back? It doesn't look deep, so if it's an injury, it should heal fine. Keep an eye on it for any red or gray
 

Joseph28

Yeah I can’t tell if that patch is an injury or what it is but i’m hoping that they’re not hurting themselves on rocks or because they males are being aggressive towards the females but will do! I’ll get taller decorations because that’s probably the problem. If I do see any red or gray what does it mean though?
 

Rtessy

Red or gray is normally a bacterial infection, gray is worse, could be the flesh decaying.
Good luck!
 

Random Great Thread

Latest threads

Top Bottom