Platy mating behavior

Discussion in 'Platy' started by Qat, Jul 26, 2015.

  1. Q

    Qat Valued Member Member

    Last week I traded in all of my female guppies and fry for store credit. I replaced them with 1 sunburst Platy and 1 gold twin bar Platy. For reference, this is my first time having platies so I'm sure I have a lot to learn. It wasn't until I got them home that I realized I had gotten a male and a female! As of yet I haven't seen any behavior indicative of mating. They pretty much stay in different parts of the tank unless it's feeding time. Now my male tequila sunrise guppy, on the other hand, will not stop chasing my female Platy. I know they can't hybridize so I'm not worried about being overrun with "plappies". However I'm curious if this is normal. He pays no attention to the male Platy.

    20 gallon
    3 male guppies, 1 male Platy, 1 female Platy, 1 ghost shrimp, 1 assassin snail
     
  2. KarenLM

    KarenLM Well Known Member Member

    I have had platy males that seem to not be interested in the females and I have one that thinks about nothing else but mating!

    With only one female it may be a good thing that he isn't harassing her. Usually you want at last two females to one male; even more females is better. I now have 1 male and 6 females - he "likes" them all and at least 5 are pregnant.


    Edit: I am not familiar with guppies - hopefully yours won't harass her to death. Keep an eye on them - he may be curious because she is new to the thank.
     
  3. Coradee

    Coradee Moderator Moderator Member

    Male livebearers have one track minds, particularly guppies ime, & will try & mate with any females regardless of species.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Q

    Qat Valued Member Member

    Oh dear. At least it's just that one guppy and not all 3 of them. Like I said I'm a newbie with platies so it was difficult to see the caudal fins at the store. I don't know if they're similar to guppies in the size/color/shape aspect when it comes to sexing them. They all looked the same to me.
     
  5. KarenLM

    KarenLM Well Known Member Member

    In platies you look at the anal fin (caudal fin is the tail). If the anal fin is a triangle it is female, if it is a spike (gonopodium) it is male. It is usually very easy to determine that they are female, but the males tend to hold the fin close to the body a lot making it a little tougher to tell.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Q

    Qat Valued Member Member

    Yeah I meant anal fin. They are clearly male and female. I've never owned such peaceful fish before! Can't imagine why I've ignored platies for so many years, they're the perfect addition to a community aquarium.
     
  7. KarenLM

    KarenLM Well Known Member Member

    And they add a lot of colour. They also swim all over the tank which is why I like them.

    Once you start to see the fry you'll really fall in live with them. 5 of mine were born in my tank last summer and I just saw another little guy a while ago.
     
  8. Tiny goatfish

    Tiny goatfish Well Known Member Member

    The only problem with platys is they are PIGS mine have a nice two course breakfast of flakes at the top then the Corys shrimp pellets at the bottom (roll eyes) but anyway, for a long time my male platy was only interested in one female. He loves chasing ALL the girls around up to until now (I moved him so I wouldn't get over run by fry) but I would say give him (the male platy) time, he will probably start chasing her soon.
     
  9. KarenLM

    KarenLM Well Known Member Member

    Try crushing the pellets for the cories - then the platies can't eat them as quickly and the cories will sift for the bits.
     
  10. Tiny goatfish

    Tiny goatfish Well Known Member Member

    Thanks! I've been doing that for my salt and pepper Corys (in a different tank) and it makes it easier for the cherry barb to eat them, I'm thinking maybe I should JUST feed the all shrimp pellets ;).
    sorry to go of subject.....
    Good luck with your platys!!!
     




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