Plants and the river rock in my aquarium

Rhianna Brown

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HI there, I was going to post this in the plant section but it seems kind of more appropriate in the beginners section.

I saw a post that someone was having trouble keeping plants down in river rock/gravel substrate.
But his was all really small rocks, and I have large ones. ranging from 2cm-a few inches that I have collected (see pic)

1.the plants have floated to the top a few times.
2. pieces of the plants have come off and got stuck to the filter about 3 leaves so far.

they are bunch plants.

is there a good way to get them to stay down even though I don't have deep substrate/gravel. ? I think I saw things before that were plastic and you put them into it or something ? like a minI crate to hold them not sure...

I only have a coup[le little plants in there , wanted to see if I could keep them alive before getting morephoto (9).JPG
 

ZakAttack

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I would recommend pushing all the rocks to one side of your tank, then getting some cheap gravel or whatever, and laying that down on the bottom level, then push all large rocks back over and repeat.

This way the plants can hold onto/held by small gravel on the bottom and the big rocks on top for decor or whatever.

Good luck! and don't forget to fertilize them correctly.
 

peacemaker92

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Welcome to Fishlore!

I use to have small plants, in which some were java fern (can't remember the names for the rest) and I tied them down to my driftwood with fishing line to prevent them from floating to the top. If you do decide to tie them down, try not to tie them down too tight. I hope that helps
 

endlercollector

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What are the plants that you are using? I think I see Java fern, which needs to be tied down loosely. You can tie them to the driftwood and even some of the large stones you have. Your substrate is very pretty, and I think it would be sad to decrease the starkness by adding gravel underneath.

Depending on what plants you have, ferts may not be at all necessary. Anubias would look good in this tank, and there are many kinds.
 
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Rhianna Brown

Rhianna Brown

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thanks! I think the guy at the store may have been wrong but he said one was anubia but I looked up that name and it doesn't look like mine. one has long swordlike leaves.

when your doing something like tieing down the plants, how do you go about it without harming the fish, I mean if you have to stick your hand way in there is that going to hurt them? (like if something from your skin gets in the water)
 

endlercollector

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There are many anubias that have long leaves, such as congensis, afzelli, frazeri, barterI var. short and sharp, etc. So I'm sure that you bought some sort of anubias. That's a good thing because it means you have a plant that will very well in your situation.

Go ahead and take out whatever it is that you want to tie you plant to and do it on a table. Tying them is always trickier think it is going to be--things slip, and yet you don't want the fishing line so tight that it digs into the rhizome.

When you do your weekly cleaning, you can lift out whatever your anubias are tied to and gently sponge off any algae. I have a kitchen sponge behind each tank specifically for the anubias

It's just good safety for your fish and you to avoid hanging out in your fish's water for a long time. I always recommend pond gloves. But if you don't have any, wash well with a non-perfumed soap that doesn't have any moisturizers, etc. dry your hands well and inspect yourself for cuts. If you have a cut, don't reach in.

And because I'm so crrrrazy about anubias, here are some of my anubias with longer leaves:
 

ZakAttack

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I personally have the same kind as your last picture. I have about 6 total anubias between all my aquariums, however, I could split them into perhaps a dozen or more. I like the look of them when they become massive. One of mine I let just float in my 20T, and after a while the roots just blew up in straight lines downward and out. It was a real sight so see, it still resembles that now even though I cut some off for my new 20L.

Some plants, like anubias, hornwort, java moss, java fern, anarcharis etc...They don't have heavy light requirements. They can survive on just your average florescent light. However, they will really do well with added fertilizers. Some will only grow slowly(anubias) and others fast(hornwort, anarcharis etc). They slow ones don't need a serious dose. And others will benefit from it, but also don't need a lot. You can make a bottle of liquid fertilizers last a long long time if you wanted.

Edit

Also, I heard of people using rubber bands and even super glue to anchor a plant down. I've never done the super glue method but I have found, that if you get the little plastic pot the plant can come with, you can place the plant in there and fill it with smaller rocks to keep it more stable. I've done that in my shrimp tank with success for a long time.
 

endlercollector

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I did forget to say that I've also ised rubber bands, but they do usually look ugly, and then fall apart sooner than you'd expect. The fishing line has worked better.
 

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