Plantless Aquascape--thoughts? - Page 2

Nobote

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Brazilian pennywort can be planted on the substrate or allowed to float- either way works fine. If you want to float it but mot have it roam...you can loop the stems around something suctioncupped...like a thermometer etc or just a clear suction cup with a plastic rod in it.
 
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Fishstery

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Nobote said:
Brazilian pennywort can be planted on the substrate or allowed to float- either way works fine. If you want to float it but mot have it roam...you can loop the stems around something suctioncupped...like a thermometer etc or just a clear suction cup with a plastic rod in it.
Great tip thank you! I actually think this is what I will end up doing
 

Silister Trench

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Fishstery said:
HI everyone!

In a few months I will be moving but one of my tanks I am taking with me will be getting a facelift prior to me moving. I definitely want to replace my black tahitian moon sand with a caribsea naturals fine gravel (like peace river maybe??) And add some more dragonstone to the hardscape. Currently I have only simple low light plants, anubias and java fern. It is a 12 gallon long (3ft long but shallow). I really like the look of the plantless aquascape, that is only rock and driftwood hardscape. I was wondering if I could get some peoples opinions on if it would be too much for my fish to lose their plant cover. The only inhabitants are my BFFs, my blue gularis killifish and my longfin German blue ram. I'm not worried much about my killi, as they are so social and not scared of anything. But my ram can be quite skittish if I come up to the tank too quickly. Obviously for his sake I will add more driftwood and create some nooks and crannies with it so he at least has a few small hiding spots. Heres a pic of the tank how it sits now:
20190223_162657.jpg




This would make my regular matience much easier as well as curb the amount of surface area algae has to grow on (which I've always battled with in this tank). Let me know what you guys think!
Plantless Aquascapes are actually more prone to algae, since there is no plant mass removing excess nutrients. I combated this by using purigen to remove excess nitrate and keep the water cleaner and using very dI'm lighting. I still find you need to scrub diatoms off regularly to keep the hardscape tank looking well. That being said, a low-maintenance tank is understocked, has minimal substrate, plenty of people pants that feed solely from the water column. Plantless tanks, or hardscape-only are pretty easy to clean, but definitely not free from algae.

PSX_20190614_212147.jpg
 
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Fishstery

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Silister Trench said:
Plantless Aquascapes are actually more prone to algae, since there is no plant mass removing excess nutrients. I combated this by using purigen to remove excess nitrate and keep the water cleaner and using very dI'm lighting. I still find you need to scrub diatoms off regularly to keep the hardscape tank looking well. That being said, a low-maintenance tank is understocked, has minimal substrate, plenty of people pants that feed solely from the water column. Plantless tanks, or hardscape-only are pretty easy to clean, but definitely not free from algae.

PSX_20190614_212147.jpg
Thanks for the advice, gorgeous tank btw! I have once again changed my mind, I cut a 2x2 into two 4 inch blocks which I prop my light up with now, this is the first week with the lights being raised, no green slime algae yet but we will see if it can make it to Saturdays water change with minimal algae growth. Now I have a red cyanobacteria outbreak---can never get any rest lol! I am still going to siphon the black sand out and replace the substrate with carib sea super naturals peace river gravel to give it a more natural look, but other than that I am keeping my plants where they are.
 

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If the green Cyanobacteria comes back, this got rid of it permanently (so far) and also might work on red, not sure.
IMG_0561.JPG
it’s safe for fish as well, just keep the tank aerated
 
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Fishstery

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clovervalley said:
If the green Cyanobacteria comes back, this got rid of it permanently (so far) and also might work on red, not sure.
IMG_0561.JPG
it’s safe for fish as well, just keep the tank aerated
I actually have that exact stuff I had to use this on the same tank in question a few months back for some blue green algae. I'm not sure if it will work for the red, but according to the guy at my local mom and pop fish store it wont. He offered me an extremely similar product only this was directly labeled for red cyanobacteria but I told him I would hold off in case I was tearing everything out and cleaning it to go plantless. I can't remember what it's called but since I'm only swapping out the substrate I'm sure the red cyanobacteria will stay and I'll post the name of this stuff when I buy it.
 

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