Plant Recommendations For...

Discussion in 'Aquarium Plants' started by Mongo75, Aug 18, 2019.

  1. Mongo75

    Mongo75Valued MemberMember

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    My 20g standard high.

    DSC_0018.JPG

    I want to get rid of that plastic plant dead center back and replace it with live plants. I will be moving the heater to the bottom, about an inch above the gravel. The powerhead on the right will be driving a sponge filter, and the HOB will be all the way to the left.

    I will be doing some air tube management (think zip ties) when I plant, trying to bury the tubes out of sight, but definitely trying to hide them from view as they enter the tank and down the back to the gravel.

    I have two anubias nanas, one java fern and a patch of (front left) s.repens.

    I would like to keep the three resin ornaments, but that's subject to change, lol.

    This is a "no co2" kit lighting tank. I plan on upgrading the lighting to one of the Finnex 24/7 lights, not sure which one yet) in the next month or so and replacing the kit hood with a glass hood when I replace the lighting.

    I want a variety of plants, perhaps 3 or 4 different types that will look good, be easy to maintain, grow relatively fast, and don't shed leaves too badly.

    Also, my pH is 7.8 to 8.0, usually 8.0. I don't (yet) test for KH or GH, so I have no idea what their readings are.

    What would be some good candidates for the above want list? I'm open to suggestions of any type, as long as it doesn't involve co2, lol.
     
  2. kallililly1973

    kallililly1973Fishlore VIPMember

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    You could try Bacopa, Anacharis, Water Wisteria, Jungle Vals those are all pretty quick growers and are a good background plant to cover up equipment. Guppy Grass is another good float around plant that you can wrap around driftwood or decorations and will fill in nicely.
     
  3. OP
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    Mongo75

    Mongo75Valued MemberMember

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    How well do plants take to being tied/glued to resin ornaments? I have all my current plants glued to terracotta and they're doing quite well, but I wasn't sure about the ornaments.
     
  4. kallililly1973

    kallililly1973Fishlore VIPMember

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    As far as i know all the ones i listed aside from the guppy grass should be planted in your substrate. but if your having luck gluing plants to your decorations why not stick with those type of plants. just a suggestion. Anytime i attach something to driftwood i use those tiny clear elastics then when the roots grab you can trim the elastic and get rid of it. never used glue and fingers make it too hard for me to use thread or fishing line so the elastics are perfect especially for rhizome plants.
     
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    Mongo75

    Mongo75Valued MemberMember

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    I was thinking more of carpeting plants, or java moss for the ornaments. I have a heck (not my real word) of a time keeping things in/under the substrate so in the past, I have tried tieing substrate plants to hydroponic pots, the ones with all the slits, and burying those and it seems to work. I'm also thinking of adding another 10 or 20 lbs of gravel to give myself a deeper substrate.

    Edit: After looking at some of the above recommendations, I'm going to give the Water Wisteria a go. From photos and what I've been reading. It sounds like it will do good as a replacement for that plastic plant and should hide equipment pretty too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
  6. kallililly1973

    kallililly1973Fishlore VIPMember

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    Although i have pool filter sand. If you cut an Xin a water bottle cap and push your pinkie through it then the stem of a plant and bury it under your gravel ( bury the cap upside down to let the gravel sit in the cap ) it usually holds pretty well. but yes a deeper substrate will also help as long as the plant has a couple roots usually.
     
  7. OP
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    Mongo75

    Mongo75Valued MemberMember

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    Something like the cap from the one gallon milk jugs? That's a great Idea! I'll have to give that a try

    For plants that need to be in the substrate,I have used 3" hydroponic pots with the top half cut off and a little stitch or 4 of thread to hold the stem and roots in place to the side of the pot. Fill them with substrate and bury them, and voila . These are actually very white, I just didn't bother setting my white balance

    20190819_17-46-25.JPG20190819_17-48-12.JPG
     
  8. kallililly1973

    kallililly1973Fishlore VIPMember

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    Yes thats a good idea as well. I was referring to the 12 ounce water bottles but i guess any cap will work . Just those water caps are very thin so they bury easily.
     
  9. OP
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    Mongo75

    Mongo75Valued MemberMember

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    The milk lids are about the same thickness, so I guess either would work , and I have a plethora of both to choose from. I just can't see my pinky and a plant's roots fitting through the smaller water bottle cap at the same time, lol. I know, the pinky pushes the roots and doesn't actually go into the cap with the roots

    I really like the cap idea though. They don't take up as much real estate.
     
  10. kallililly1973

    kallililly1973Fishlore VIPMember

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    Doing the bottle cap you dont have to push your pinkie and the plant through at the same time. Just cut the X then push your pinkie and remove it to make a little hole i n the center of the X then put your stem plant through it.
     
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    Mongo75

    Mongo75Valued MemberMember

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    That's what I was trying to say, lol. The finger doesnt fo anything other than push the plant into the cap. I was just picturing my chubby pinky and a plant's roots wedged toghther in such a small space and it made me laugh to myself
     
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    Mongo75

    Mongo75Valued MemberMember

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    Ok, Mongo need help :banghead:

    I received my order of water wisteria today. Eighteen stems total. I tried for over an hour to get them to stay put:eek:. No dice:banghead::eek::banghead::eek::banghead::banghead::banghead:

    Wrapped them back in the lead and just stuck them into the gravel substrate in frustration.

    So, bottle capso_O...

    Getting them isn't a problem. Cutting the "X"...not a problem. It's what to do next.

    My question is, how many stems would you recommend poking through each cap? Would 3 be too many? I'd like to spread these out along the back wall.

    And, there aren't any roots:eek:. Is that normal? Just stem down to a stub! Have I been taken to the cleaners?

    Help!
     
  13. kallililly1973

    kallililly1973Fishlore VIPMember

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    3 won't be too many per cap but i personally would do each one individual in caps. set them all up in a tote and make your bottle cap x's and push the stems through then gently bury all your bottle caps. i started with just stems on most all of my plants and a root tab and some thrive got them going. Take your time float a couple if u feel overwhelmed. This is a long term hobby. It's not gonna be a heavily planted tank overnight If any float up get a new cap instead of digging for the one it came out of to avoid others from floating. . Good luck!!
     
  14. OP
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    Mongo75

    Mongo75Valued MemberMember

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    I actually reposted this question in a similar thread, as well as here. I had forgotten about our previous conversation (I hate getting old, lol) until I saw the other thread so I came back and posted here and there. Never hurts to ask too much.

    As none of these new stems had any roots, I pulled them out of the lead, and substrate, snipped off the rotten looking stubs, and they're now floating. I was told they would start to develop a new root system and after the roots get going, I can put them in the bottle caps and then place them into the substrate. Will be ordering some root tabs soon, too. Right now, I'm only using Flourish Comprehensive for my water column feeders.

    I'm also discovering that not all bottle caps are created equal! Some are down right stubborn, and stiff as can be. I've got a precision screwdriver stuck through them until I'm ready, to spread them out a little, lol. I may even have to snip a little of the plastic off. Who knows!

    Thanks
     
  15. kallililly1973

    kallililly1973Fishlore VIPMember

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    I found the easiest way to cut the caps are to place them on a hard surface and use a utility knife to make the first diagonal slice then for the other one cut from the outside edge to the center of the first cut and spin the cap and finish it with one more slice from the outside edge to the center. Keep your fingers and thumbs away from the cap at all times.
    Edit: here is a quick video but their using a large cap which this can be done the same way with a water bottle cap
     
  16. OP
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    Mongo75

    Mongo75Valued MemberMember

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    That's basically what I did. Some of the caps though, are from "fru-fru" water bottles and are much stiffer than your generic or run-of-the-mill half liter water. More like the soft drink bottles.
     
  17. acjag

    acjagValued MemberMember

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    Sorry for jumping in here and don't want to be a bump on the log but I have a feeling you'll find your Wisteria stems will rot if inserted (buried) in the substrate. Mine did. I was down to one stem out of six and out off frustration it was left to float for a week because I was preoccupied with my occupation, low and behold I noticed this one sole stem started to sprout shoots from sides so I managed to tie a piece of fishing line to it and the other end of line had a fishing sinker attached. I buried sinker into substrate and allowed stems to just barely hover over substrate. In another week or so side shoots grew down into substrate anchoring plant in place. Now my 55 is filled with Wisteria and when I propagate the procedure just explained is performed. I will no longer insert Wisteria into substrate. This is the only plant in my aquarium that this stem rot issue has occurred, all my other stems when propagated are inserted.
     
  18. OP
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    Mongo75

    Mongo75Valued MemberMember

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    Now that I'm sitting here watching them rolling in the output of my HOB, I'm kind of liking the effect.I may leave them like this until they are well developed, then see how the bottle caps work. I really want something planted along the back wall to hide filter tubes and such, but that rolling effect is way cool too.
     
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