Plant From a Pond?

Goldmoon

Hello! I have a quick question that I was hoping someone on here could help me out with. In general, how safe is it to use plants from a pond in an aquarium? Of course, I would quarantine any wild plant for a while before adding it to any fish tank to make sure it isn’t carrying anything. Has anyone done this before? Is it worth the hassle to try and collect freshwater plants from a pond to use in an aquarium? Or will it just end in disease and fish death? Just curious. Thanks in advance!
 

Mudminnow

I have done this many times. It's tons of fun. Just make sure it's legal to collect what you're collecting where you're collecting it.

Personally, I've never had any issues at all with "pests" or diseases. I'm not a fan of quarantining or treating my plants either. I usually try to get a good bit of the substrate the plants are growing in with the plants and place all of that in my tank straight away. For me, I want to get all the potentially beneficial mycorrhiza and/or microbes I can. Plus all those little critters that come in with the plants and substrate are fascinating, beneficial, and/or fish food.

And, in the event you get something that could hurt your fishes (like a dragonfly larvae or something), they aren't too tough to pick out. I guess one downside is, you could potentially get insects hatching in your house. This has happened to me several times, but it never bugs me....
 
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Goldmoon

I have done this many times. It's tons of fun. Just make sure it's legal to collect what you're collecting where you're collecting it.

Personally, I've never had any issues at all with "pests" or diseases. I'm not a fan of quarantining or treating my plants either. I usually try to get a good bit of the substrate the plants are growing in with the plants and place all of that in my tank straight away. For me, I want to get all the potentially beneficial mycorrhiza and/or microbes I can. Plus all those little critters that come in with the plants and substrate are fascinating, beneficial, and/or fish food.

And, in the event you get something that could hurt your fishes (like a dragonfly larvae or something), they aren't too tough to pick out. I guess one downside is, you could potentially get insects hatching in your house. This has happened to me several times, but it never bugs me....
Awesome, thanks so much for the response! I’m excited to try collecting my own plants (now that I know it’s safe) and add them to one of my fish tanks. It’s definitely going to save me a lot of money in the long run, and it’ll be fun to collect different species of plants. Maybe I’ll even end up creating a brand new fish tank with the wild plants, and it’ll be like a truly natural habitat for the fish. Thanks again!
 
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Flyfisha

A little research is required on the plants taken from the wild. Goldmoon your profile does not say if you live in a tropical climate? If the pond is cold the plants will not all survive in a tropical fish tank.

Actually some of the best plants come from suburban ponds . Small ponds in the city that others have dumped their goldfish in plants and all. The pond may have become overgrown with aquarium plants you need to be able to recognise the aquarium and tropical plants.
Many aquarium plants are considered pests because they grow into problem plants in the wild.

Researching is the key.

In my country we have a few aquarium plants that are spreading into the wild and a few natives worth cultivating.

I watched this video the other night.



Personally I toss wild plants in buckets of old tank water by the back doorstep and wait a month before even thinking about adding them to an indoor fish tank.My experience has been ok but I did bring home some goldfish eggs on dry plant material that sat in my canoe for hours on the way home . You might imagine my surprise at seeing fry in the bucket?
 
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Goldmoon

A little research is required on the plants taken from the wild. Goldmoon your profile does not say if you live in a tropical climate? If the pond is cold the plants will not all survive in a tropical fish tank.

Actually some of the best plants come from suburban ponds . Small ponds in the city that others have dumped their goldfish in plants and all. The pond may have become overgrown with aquarium plants you need to be able to recognise the aquarium and tropical plants.
Many aquarium plants are considered pests because they grow into problem plants in the wild.

Researching is the key.

In my country we have a few aquarium plants that are spreading into the wild and a few natives worth cultivating.

I watched this video the other night.



Personally I toss wild plants in buckets of old tank water by the back doorstep and wait a month before even thinking about adding them to an indoor fish tank.My experience has been ok but I did bring home some goldfish eggs on dry plant material that sat in my canoe for hours on the way home . You might imagine my surprise at seeing fry in the bucket?
Thank you for your response! No, I do not live in a tropical climate. I would be harvesting these plants mainly from a man-made pond in my area, which is at a nearby campground. The inhabitants are bluegill, largemouth bass and grass carp. The pond has no outside water coming in (I.e from a creek or river), it’s a closed ecosystem. I don’t think I’d put the plants in a tropical tank, but if I did I’d keep the temperature no higher than mid-70s (I did a bit of reading on the temperatures for wild plants earlier).
The ponds in my area tend to freeze over in the winter. Will this have any effect on the lifespan of the plants? If I keep them in a coldwater tank, would they live year-round, or would they die off seasonally? This was one of the things I had trouble finding information about, and I’m just curious.
I wouldn’t take an excessive amount of plants to start with, in case it doesn’t end up working out. And I plan on quarantining them for a while before adding them to a fish tank. I definitely don’t want to end up with any hitchhikers or fish eggs on the plants! (It’s amazing those goldfish eggs even survived on yours!)
Thanks again for your response!
 
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