Planning To Own A Betta

Discussion in 'Betta Fish' started by Zerologist, Apr 9, 2017.

  1. Zerologist

    ZerologistWell Known MemberMember

    Hi guys! I'm actually planning to own a betta. I already experienced taking care of bettas but I left them in my home country with my uncle, where they died XD...

    I'm planning to put it in my 7.5g tank if my remaining 3 guppies are going to die.

    Here are my questions:

    - Any tips on what to do and how to take care of it very well?
    -Also what kind of betta should I choose?
    - What deco/plant/equipment should I have to make the betta happy and something to rest on?

    Thanks in advance!!!

    Plus what tank mates can you suggest?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 10, 2017
  2. wem21Well Known MemberMember

    So, you want 1-2 hiding spots for your betta and somewhere to lie down, make sure yur decor is smooth and non spiky, and cycle yur tank first. Bettas cant go with guppies, they kay mistake them for rival males. Good hiding spots are caves, or tunnels. Any betta will do, the only tankmates that are suitable in a 7.5g are shrimp (risk of becoming food) and snails (less risk of becoming food.) in the summer, you can leave a bucket if water outside, and collect the mosquiitoe larvae and feed it to yur betta.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Zerologist

    ZerologistWell Known MemberMember

    Thanks! Anyone has other suuggestions? I'm gathering more information... Please help...
     




  4. Neptune334

    Neptune334Valued MemberMember

    While I am still a beginner, I do have some recommendations on caring for your betta. I see by your profile that you do not know about the nitrogen cycle. Your guppy deaths may have been caused by an ammonia spike that happened in the uncycled tank. This is definitely something you want to research. Betta fish come in a wide variety of colors and fin types. Female bettas tend to have shorter fins than males. Tail types include plakats, halfmoons, crowntails, and veiltails. Some say that long-finned bettas tend to have more problems with fin rot and tail biting because of how the tails weigh them down, and that females and plakat males tend to be more active. However, I think that if you like a betta, you should go ahead and get it regardless of tail type. As far as decorations and plants go, the main thing to look for is if they are soft enough. Rough plastics can easily rip a betta's soft, beautiful fins. Because of this, most hobbyists advise using silk and live plants. You will definitely need a heater, preferably adjustable, since bettas are tropical fish. A filter with a low flow is required, because it will provide a place for mechanical, biological, and chemical filtration. Some people recommend sponge filters for bettas because they provide tons of biological filtration with virtually no flow. Power filters can also be used, as long as they are not too strong and can be baffled. I think I answered all of the questions above, but if I missed something or you want to know something else, I will be happy to answer!
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Zerologist

    ZerologistWell Known MemberMember

    Can it live without a filter? Because before I also took care of some bettas in different small aquariums but they seem to be doing well without a filter. They just died because of my uncle. XD
     
  6. Neptune334

    Neptune334Valued MemberMember

    While a betta technically could live without a filter and frequent water changes, I would not recommend it. Filters have lots of benefits and it would definitely make maintenance easier if you had one.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Zerologist

    ZerologistWell Known MemberMember

    Cuz I only have one filter which I use for my 30g plus I cannot buy one because I'm just a student and I don't think my parents would buy another one.
     
  8. Neptune334

    Neptune334Valued MemberMember

    Do you have an unused air pump laying around anywhere? If you do, you could make a DIY filter from a water bottle and some media. If you can't get a filter, you will just have to be diligent in keeping up with water changes.
     
  9. PythonTheBetta

    PythonTheBettaValued MemberMember

    if you are unable to buy or make a filter, don't buy a betta yet. It will be very hard to cycle and maintain water parameters without a filter.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Zerologist

    ZerologistWell Known MemberMember

    Thanks for the advice! Well that's actually what my lil bro is asking me to do. XD
     
  11. justinmo

    justinmoValued MemberMember

    I agree with Python, if you can't have or get a filter yet, don't get any fish. You should be ready beforehand.
     
  12. BottomDweller

    BottomDwellerFishlore VIPMember

    Yeah and once you've made/bought a filter make sure to cycle it before getting the betta.

    To be honest I would focus on saving your guppies instead of planning what fish to get when they die.
     
  13. BlissfulBetta

    BlissfulBettaValued MemberMember

    When choosing your new fish, choose a very healthy looking betta. I've heard that Plakats and Crowntails are the best bettas because they don't have all the fin issues that Rosetail and Halfmoon bettas have.

    Tank: That tank size sounds great! Just make sure it is ready for the betta before you purchase/adopt it. The tank should be cycled and heated to 78-80°F. It's necessary to have many hiding places for your betta. I really recommend using live plants for this. My betta loves hiding in floating plants and under the leaves of the plants in the substrate. If you don't want to use live plants, silk plants are another great option. Driftwood and PVC pipe are also great decorations for a betta tank in my opinion.

    Substate: Avoid rough stones and jagged gravel. These can injure your betta or tear his fins. Personally I like to use sand as a substrate. It's easy to clean and will not hurt your betta's fins. You could also use smooth rocks, but these will need to be vaccumed often as debris and fish food/poop will get wedged in the rocks.

    Food: It is best to feed your betta a variety of foods. These can include pellets such as Omega One Betta Buffet, New Life Spectrum Betta Pellets, frozen bloodworms, frozen brine shrimp etc. Freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp are okay, but they must be soaked until they sink before fed to the betta - if not, the betta could become bloated. Freeze dried foods can lose some nutrition during the freeze drying process as well. Also, it would be best to soak any pellets before giving them to your fish to avoid bloating.

    Filter: In my opinion a filter is necessary - otherwise very frequent partial water changes are needed. The Tetra Whisper PF10 is a great filter for your size tank. I have it for my 10 gallon and I love it! The flow does have to be baffled though. Many people love sponge filters as well!

    Bettas are awesome! Have fun!:)
     
  14. PythonTheBetta

    PythonTheBettaValued MemberMember

    Bare bottom is also an option! I find it much easier to maintain than substrate. But it still looks nice!
     
  15. FishandFun

    FishandFunValued MemberMember

    My suggestion, save up and buy it yourself. I somehow manage to pay for a 2, 20 and 75 gallon tanks. Also, if you buy it yourself your parents will be more likely to let you get it.
     
  16. Jnx

    JnxValued MemberMember

    I keep several of my bettas unfiltered, but would definitely not recommend it.

    If you're not filtering, nearly daily water changes are an absolute necessity. Without near-religious water changes, your water can quickly become toxic. Skipping even one day can lead to fin rot and a whole slew of potential problems, even possible fatalities.

    I am lucky enough that I can work frequent, usually daily, partial water changes into my work schedule, which already included two hours of daily orchid watering before getting back into bettas. It was easy for me to just work in water changes into my plant watering routine. I've also spent most of my life caring for livestock, so daily chores that need to be done or something could actually die is part of my make-up.

    If you want more fun than chores, get a filter before buying your fish.

    I use the Exo Terra reptile filter F150 in a couple of my ponds. While it's a tiny terrarium filter, and requires regular cleaning, it is a sponge filter with low current, which bettas prefer. It can handle up to ten gallons, is fully submersible, can be mounted in any position, and only costs 12 bucks. I wholly recommend you buy one- 12 bucks should be doable.
     




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