PH question

  • Thread starter

idk

Valued Member
Messages
90
Reaction score
60
Points
28
Experience
3 years
So, down to the LFS today and of course they have a beautiful 8ft reef set up (even my dad was in awe). I've been thinking about doing a reef tank for a while but never went into it further than looking at a few species. Today I did a bit more research and from what I found it seems like marine tanks like a higher pH, especially reef tanks with ideal conditions from 8 - 8.4. I've done and am still doing freshwater tanks and my pH is around the 6.8 mark. I know you have different test kits for fresh/salt but is pH the same? For example will the 6.8 fresh still be 6.8 saltwater? Sorry if this is a dumb question! I'm just wondering if a marine tank would be achievable pH wise and if you guys think it would be worth changing the pH and possibly keeping a saltwater tank.
 

Corycatz

New Member
Messages
48
Reaction score
19
Points
8
No, the ph is the same, freshwater is usually at the 6.5-8 mark, with saltwater or marine tanks being around a pH of 8
 

saltwater60

Well Known Member
Messages
2,514
Reaction score
1,431
Points
173
So a 6.8 ph of fresh water would be the same theoretically in saltwater.

However when you add the salt the minerals in the salt will increase the ph. If not you can add things to change the ph to achieve the 8.0-8.4ph desired in a saltwater tank.

Nearly all saltwater keepers use RODI water that strips all minerals from the water and make the water around a 7.0 ph anyway then we add our desired minerals back through salt and other minerals added.
 
  • Thread starter

idk

Valued Member
Messages
90
Reaction score
60
Points
28
Experience
3 years
Corycatz said:
No, the ph is the same, freshwater is usually at the 6.5-8 mark, with saltwater or marine tanks being around a pH of 8
saltwater60 said:
So a 6.8 ph of fresh water would be the same theoretically in saltwater.

However when you add the salt the minerals in the salt will increase the ph. If not you can add things to change the ph to achieve the 8.0-8.4ph desired in a saltwater tank.

Nearly all saltwater keepers use RODI water that strips all minerals from the water and make the water around a 7.0 ph anyway then we add our desired minerals back through salt and other minerals added.
Thank you! This has cleared up my confusion lol
 

Jesterrace

Well Known Member
Messages
3,193
Reaction score
1,292
Points
198
Experience
3 years
idk said:
So, down to the LFS today and of course they have a beautiful 8ft reef set up (even my dad was in awe). I've been thinking about doing a reef tank for a while but never went into it further than looking at a few species. Today I did a bit more research and from what I found it seems like marine tanks like a higher pH, especially reef tanks with ideal conditions from 8 - 8.4. I've done and am still doing freshwater tanks and my pH is around the 6.8 mark. I know you have different test kits for fresh/salt but is pH the same? For example will the 6.8 fresh still be 6.8 saltwater? Sorry if this is a dumb question! I'm just wondering if a marine tank would be achievable pH wise and if you guys think it would be worth changing the pH and possibly keeping a saltwater tank.
I'll be honest, I've never once tested the pH in my reef tank in 3 years, although I stick to weekly partial water changes, only use RODI. Unless you are keeping SPS Corals (considered to be the most finicky) then you will be okay if you stay on top of maintenance in that respect. Honestly I feel that pH is more of a concern for freshwater tanks that are planted or go longer without water changes.
 

saltwater60

Well Known Member
Messages
2,514
Reaction score
1,431
Points
173
Jesterrace said:
I'll be honest, I've never once tested the pH in my reef tank in 3 years, although I stick to weekly partial water changes, only use RODI. Unless you are keeping SPS Corals (considered to be the most finicky) then you will be okay if you stay on top of maintenance in that respect. Honestly I feel that pH is more of a concern for freshwater tanks that are planted or go longer without water changes.
Agreed that if you keep the salinity, calcium, alkalinity, and magnesium in check your ph will be fine. I’d test to confirm and then be done with it.
 

ystrout

Well Known Member
Messages
1,492
Reaction score
900
Points
148
Experience
4 years
Does the salt you add to the RO water also contain calcium and other trace elements that keep the KH and PH up? Or do you add those separately?
 

saltwater60

Well Known Member
Messages
2,514
Reaction score
1,431
Points
173
ystrout said:
Does the salt you add to the RO water also contain calcium and other trace elements that keep the KH and PH up? Or do you add those separately?
Salt normally has it all if you buy reef salt but if you have corals with skeletons you’ll likely need to supplement calcium, alkalinity, and magnesium.
 
Toggle Sidebar

New Threads

Similar Threads

Aquarium Calculator

Aquarium Photo Contests

Follow FishLore!

FishLore on Social Media





Top Bottom