20 Gallon Tank Peppered Corydoras have white/clear "hairs" on their barbells and fins

Rise

Member

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Hello, I noticed my corydoras have these little white/clear hairs on mainly their barbells and fins. Does anyone know what they might be?

I looked around as best i could, but i could not find anything similar. It has been about a week or two, the condition seems to be only worsening on the juvenile cory (still eating, but hides more). The adult cory is going about as usual. They are both peppered corys. (I know i should have more than 2, i will be upgrading my tank size very soon).

I have some amanos, guppies, tetras, and ottos in the tank as well (20g high). As per usual they seem very active and appear to be uneffected (at least currently).

I suspect the juvenile cory was the source, as i thought he looked thin when i got him. But chocked it up to, lack of being fed at the petstore. Unfortunately, i do not have a quarantine tank so it was a bad decision i know.

These are my tank parameters:

Size: 20g high (Heavily planted)
Nitrate: 10ppm
Nitrite: 0
Ammonia: 0
Ph: 7.2

Filters:
- Marina s20 slim HOB filter (customized for 3 stage filtration: course sponge/purigen/tidal matrix/filter floss)
- Topfin 10g corner filter (Medium course sponge only)
-I also have some pothos plants in the HOB filter

Any help would be greatly appreciated, never seen anything like this before.
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Think they are kind of flukes / nemathodes
 
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Rise

Member
DoubleDutch said:
Think they are kind of flukes / nemathodes
I think you may be right, they seem like they may be moving very slightly, i managed to get a better photo.


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DoubleDutch

Member
Pretty sure. Seen this earlier on finedges.
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Rise said:
You think seachem paraguard would do the trick?
Mmmm don't know how good that works against these parasites.
 
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Rise

Member

Mlou

Member
For flukes both body and gills use Prazi-pro...very safe and very effective. I am not sure if they still make it but when I bought my bottle it was expensive...
 
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Rise

Member
Mlou said:
For flukes both body and gills use Prazi-pro...very safe and very effective. I am not sure if they still make it but when I bought my bottle it was expensive...
Awesome, thank you! I actually managed to find a bottle of PraziPro by Hikari on amazon. It was about $12 for a 4oz bottle.
 

Oriongal

Member
You can't see Gyrodactylus with the naked eye, they're microscopic. Anchor worms would be more likely, given the size.
 
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Rise

Member
Oriongal said:
You can't see Gyrodactylus with the naked eye, they're microscopic. Anchor worms would be more likely, given the size.
Wouldnt anchor worms be bigger? I could barely see them, even using a macro lense. If they were anchor worms, wouldnt they have a forked end, and redness around where they are attached? These have not grown any larger, they only seem to multiply.

I actually managed to get a clear macro video of one moving
 

Oriongal

Member
I unfortunately can't see video from where I am at the moment, but from everything I've read previously, they could only be seen via microscope.

So, I went looking further, and found that there actually is a Gyrodactylus corydori among the many Gyro species. But it's listed as still being 0.5mm if I'm reading the article right, which I think would still be too small to see naked-eye, and those are visible even from the farther-out view.

(Link to article, Gyrodactylus corydori is mentioned on the page numbered 17, near the bottom-right, with measurements: )

Regardless, a treatment with Prazi or combination Prazi/metro wouldn't be a bad idea anyway, with the caveat that powdered Prazi isn't as water-soluble as they advertise. I've usually had to put it in a bottle with tank water and shake it up well to dose it in powdered form, the Prazi-Pro liquid is actually easier for that reason.
 
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Rise

Member
Oriongal said:
I unfortunately can't see video from where I am at the moment, but from everything I've read previously, they could only be seen via microscope.

So, I went looking further, and found that there actually is a Gyrodactylus corydori among the many Gyro species. But it's listed as still being 0.5mm if I'm reading the article right, which I think would still be too small to see naked-eye, and those are visible even from the farther-out view.

(Link to article, Gyrodactylus corydori is mentioned on the page numbered 17, near the bottom-right, with measurements: )

Regardless, a treatment with Prazi or combination Prazi/metro wouldn't be a bad idea anyway, with the caveat that powdered Prazi isn't as water-soluble as they advertise. I've usually had to put it in a bottle with tank water and shake it up well to dose it in powdered form, the Prazi-Pro liquid is actually easier for that reason.
Oh yeah no kidding, that is definitely too small to see. These are more like 1 or 2cm max. I wonder what they could be then, as you would think it would be documented somewhere by now.

But yeah im hoping the Prazi-pro will do the trick, as they definitely seem to be a parasite of some sort. One of them actually managed to make its way onto the eye of a guppy of mine somehow. I was able to get it to dissattach with a salt bath, as i was afraid of secondary damage.

Thank you for the info! I went with the liquid version because i actually heard that its not very water soluble as well.

So far so good, thought it turned my water into sprite for a second though lol
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Oriongal said:
I unfortunately can't see video from where I am at the moment, but from everything I've read previously, they could only be seen via microscope.

So, I went looking further, and found that there actually is a Gyrodactylus corydori among the many Gyro species. But it's listed as still being 0.5mm if I'm reading the article right, which I think would still be too small to see naked-eye, and those are visible even from the farther-out view.

(Link to article, Gyrodactylus corydori is mentioned on the page numbered 17, near the bottom-right, with measurements: )

Regardless, a treatment with Prazi or combination Prazi/metro wouldn't be a bad idea anyway, with the caveat that powdered Prazi isn't as water-soluble as they advertise. I've usually had to put it in a bottle with tank water and shake it up well to dose it in powdered form, the Prazi-Pro liquid is actually easier for that reason.
Why Meyroplex ?
 

Oriongal

Member
Rise said:
One of them actually managed to make its way onto the eye of a guppy of mine somehow. I was able to get it to dissattach with a salt bath, as i was afraid of secondary damage.
You can do a salt bath with a cory as well. They don't tolerate salt as a use-all-the-time thing like livebearers can, for example; but used as a bath, they will generally tolerate it (and you can remove them back to their tank without issue if they don't tolerate the full 30 mins). Catfish farms (catfish raised for food) use salt for external parasites and infections sometimes as well, because what you can use medication-wise for farmed food fish is pretty limited.

DoubleDutch said:
Why Meyroplex ?
Because several US meds already have it, like API General Cure and Fritz Paracleanse. (I'd missed the post that they'd already bought the Hikari PP.)

I generally use both together (even if I use the liquid Prazi, will use MetroPlex with it) for new fish in QT, since a fish can have more than one kind of parasite at a time; and because they are proven to be okay together, and aren't particularly hard on the fish. Metro has some antibacterial properties as well, against anaerobic bacteria. But I wouldn't call it a requirement for a visible parasite, it'd be only in the 'can't-hurt' category here.
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Mmmmm it is just my personal dislike
of using meds as "cant hurt" hahahaha.
In my opinion any med does something to the fish / the environment. I'd only use when needed.

I also dislike the Aquarium Coop way, whuch I think is a scam.
But as said it's personal.

BTW great find the gyrodactylus corydori.
 

Oriongal

Member
After losing all my hastatus to something that I never saw, and never was able to get on top of, that had to have come in with the last new fish I'd gotten - fish that had been through 2 weeks of non-medicated quarantine at the seller's end and one week at mine...I changed my mind about proactive anti-parasite meds, especially with wild-caughts.
 
  • Thread Starter

Rise

Member
Oriongal said:
You can do a salt bath with a cory as well. They don't tolerate salt as a use-all-the-time thing like livebearers can, for example; but used as a bath, they will generally tolerate it (and you can remove them back to their tank without issue if they don't tolerate the full 30 mins). Catfish farms (catfish raised for food) use salt for external parasites and infections sometimes as well, because what you can use medication-wise for farmed food fish is pretty limited.


Because several US meds already have it, like API General Cure and Fritz Paracleanse. (I'd missed the post that they'd already bought the Hikari PP.)

I generally use both together (even if I use the liquid Prazi, will use MetroPlex with it) for new fish in QT, since a fish can have more than one kind of parasite at a time; and because they are proven to be okay together, and aren't particularly hard on the fish. Metro has some antibacterial properties as well, against anaerobic bacteria. But I wouldn't call it a requirement for a visible parasite, it'd be only in the 'can't-hurt' category here.
I might just have to do that, one of my corys seems to have quite alot of them, i suspect he might have been the source. Maybe i can collect one of them to get a better look.

I will pick up some MetroPlex as well, just in case. Its probably a good idea to have it on hand if ever needed. I think i will let the praziquantal take its course first though, then dose with Metro if needed.

After this, im going to setup a QT tank. I never expected to be buying more fish or getting more tanks, but for the future its probably a good idea.

I really appreciate the info, thank you both! Cant imagine what a local petstore what have told me.
 

Oriongal

Member
Rise said:
I might just have to do that, one of my corys seems to have quite alot of them, i suspect he might have been the source. Maybe i can collect one of them to get a better look.

I will pick up some MetroPlex as well, just in case. Its probably a good idea to have it on hand if ever needed. I think i will let the praziquantal take its course first though, then dose with Metro if needed.

After this, im going to setup a QT tank. I never expected to be buying more fish or getting more tanks, but for the future its probably a good idea.

I really appreciate the info, thank you both! Cant imagine what a local petstore what have told me.
The main thing to watch for when doing a salt bath is for the fish to reach a tipping-over point. With corys, they'll sort of lean, like they're propping up with only one of their ventral fins, or will actually go over onto their side, or even belly-up. Removing them immediately back to fresh water if that happens at any point is all that is needed, and they'll recover their equilibrium. I've only had one actually reach that point, most of them have gone the full 30 without leaning or rolling; but the one that did was fine afterward (and still fine now).

Thank you also for posting the pics, I have never actually seen a cory with a parasite like that before. I did have a platy with what I assume(d) was anchor worms once, near the same size (worm) as in your pics but on the body; no idea where it had come from though, she wasn't a new fish and no other fish had them or ever got them either (maybe came in on a plant, I hadn't added any other fish at that time). I can't remember for certain now what I used on her, but I didn't have to physically remove it. Want to say I gave her a salt and methylene blue bath, and then a week in QT with Paragard.
 
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Rise

Member
Oriongal said:
The main thing to watch for when doing a salt bath is for the fish to reach a tipping-over point. With corys, they'll sort of lean, like they're propping up with only one of their ventral fins, or will actually go over onto their side, or even belly-up. Removing them immediately back to fresh water if that happens at any point is all that is needed, and they'll recover their equilibrium. I've only had one actually reach that point, most of them have gone the full 30 without leaning or rolling; but the one that did was fine afterward (and still fine now).

Thank you also for posting the pics, I have never actually seen a cory with a parasite like that before. I did have a platy with what I assume(d) was anchor worms once, near the same size (worm) as in your pics but on the body; no idea where it had come from though, she wasn't a new fish and no other fish had them or ever got them either (maybe came in on a plant, I hadn't added any other fish at that time). I can't remember for certain now what I used on her, but I didn't have to physically remove it. Want to say I gave her a salt and methylene blue bath, and then a week in QT with Paragard.
Okay, i will watch out for that! Im honestly very impressed with the Prazi-Pro so far. I dosed at about noon, and the most infected cory seems to have shed nearly all of the visible parasites.

He is a juvenile peppered cory. Would that effect how much salt i should add into the salt bath? Not sure if younger corys are more intolerant or not.

No problem though! You never know, someone might have the same situation and come across this post for answers. Im suprised you noticed it on your platy, good catch! These guys are incredibly small, very easy to overlook.
 

Mlou

Member
Rise said:
Okay, i will watch out for that! Im honestly very impressed with the Prazi-Pro so far. I dosed at about noon, and the most infected cory seems to have shed nearly all of the visible parasites.

He is a juvenile peppered cory. Would that effect how much salt i should add into the salt bath? Not sure if younger corys are more intolerant or not.

No problem though! You never know, someone might have the same situation and come across this post for answers. Im suprised you noticed it on your platy, good catch! These guys are incredibly small, very easy to overlook.
I love prazi. I used it when I had discus and never did without a bottle at hand. I am in the camp of pro active treatment. When I get a fish home I immediately put it through a five day ich x and prazi regiment. I also mix some general cure metro into a batch of soaked pellet mixed with some garlic powder and some epsom salt and the fish gets that as the only food for a week. All these meds are well tolerated and the fish comes out clean and clear at the end. No sense in allowing for something to explode because then it might be harder to deal with.
 

DoubleDutch

Member
I'd stick to the Prazipro.
Corys and Salt aren't friends.
 

Oriongal

Member
DoubleDutch said:
I'd stick to the Prazipro.
Corys and Salt aren't friends.
Have you actually tried it, as a bath?

I'd actually call it gentler than most meds, and there are also times that it works when nothing else has. An organism can become med-resistant, but they generally don't become salt-resistant (unless they were already, such as streptococcus which naturally occurs in both marine and freshwater environments). It works because a small and less complex organism has fewer barriers to get through (skin vs. cell wall, etc), and so will hit toxicity long before the larger organism.

It is also used, as I said, on farmed catfish - channel catfish are smooth-skinned (no armor plating), and it's actually used in their ponds, not just as a bath treatment.
Rise said:
He is a juvenile peppered cory. Would that effect how much salt i should add into the salt bath? Not sure if younger corys are more intolerant or not.
Never had an occasion to use it with a juvenile, since typically the only juveniles I have were hatched in my tanks. But I have used it on pygmys at the same strength, with no issues.
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Oriongal said:
Have you actually tried it, as a bath?

I'd actually call it gentler than most meds, and there are also times that it works when nothing else has. An organism can become med-resistant, but they generally don't become salt-resistant (unless they were already, such as streptococcus which naturally occurs in both marine and freshwater environments). It works because a small and less complex organism has fewer barriers to get through (skin vs. cell wall, etc), and so will hit toxicity long before the larger organism.

It is also used, as I said, on farmed catfish - channel catfish are smooth-skinned (no armor plating), and it's actually used in their ponds, not just as a bath treatment.


Never had an occasion to use it with a juvenile, since typically the only juveniles I have were hatched in my tanks. But I have used it on pygmys at the same strength, with no issues.
But why give saltbaths when Prazipro is allready used and appears to work.

Gentler ? You're decribing a tipping over point and going belly up. I don't exactly understand how gentle that is then.
 

Oriongal

Member
If it's working, there is no reason to. I originally wrote that before we knew it was working, in response to the OP saying they'd done it with their guppy when it also turned up with one of these parasites on its eye, and it had worked. ETA: in response to your post, I should have cropped it to just 'Salt and corys aren't friends', I wasn't saying discontinue the Prazi in favor of salt. Only that it's a misconception, from what I've seen and read, that catfish don't tolerate salt at all.

I also said that I've only had one that ever reached that loss-of-equilibrium point, out of the many, many times I've given a salt bath. I get most of my fish online, I don't get to see them ahead of time - so I also tend to get more than a few dodgy new arrivals, it's just the risk that you take when getting them sight-unseen. I don't have a lot of local options where I live.

Editing again because a better example occurred to me. If 100 people line up to give a pint of blood, we can expect that 1 or 2 may have a loss of equilibrium as a direct result. From feeling dizzy, to actually losing consciousness. It's a well known physiological response, and the person is in no danger as long as we're not letting them hit their head on the way down, or continuing to take blood from them past the pint that was intended.

I'd also describe that as 'gentler' than taking Paracetamol for a headache, even though the risk of losing consciousness is 'worse' than the side effects generally expected with Paracetamol. Because it's not introducing something foreign into the body, there's no chemical component being introduced. There aren't any lasting internal effects from passing out while giving blood, nothing foreign to collect in the liver or kidneys. That's all I meant, the difference between a well-understood physiological response, and the introduction of something foreign even if it's also generally safe.

Also, any freshwater fish can lose equilibrium in a salt bath, even ones that can be acclimated over time to full salt, like mollies.

Not saying that salt is better than targeted medication, that's not my intent. Just that there's also no reason to be afraid of it, including with corys. It's cheap, it's easy to keep on hand, and doesn't have an expiration date. It's available in all countries. It can sometimes be effective when medication-resistant infections or infestations are encountered. It can be effective for both external infections and external parasites, which may be useful when something crops up and you can't immediately get your hands on the right targeted antibiotic or antiparasite. Or aren't completely sure you know exactly which bacteria/parasite you're dealing with. It's just another tool in the box, that's all.

I have often wondered if the whole 'no salt with corys' (and tetras, and other soft-water fish) was advice originally directed at the use of salt-based water softeners (as many whole-house ones are), and over time it just became a blanket statement that lost its specific reference.
 

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