Paradise Fish In 10 Gallon?

RachelNoel

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After snooping around for quite a while I've come to the conclusion that pet store bettas aren't very hardy, in fact, their gen pool is all kinds of funk. So if I end up failing to keep one alive I would like to keep a species that is equally as entertaining, and can also eat whatever betta food is left. I love the idea of a single paradise fish, but I'm getting conflicting information on tank size; as well as proper temperature.
Would a 10 gallon be too small? And what temperature should I keep the tank around?
 

Caleb Smith

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RachelNoel said:
After snooping around for quite a while I've come to the conclusion that pet store bettas aren't very hardy, in fact, their gen pool is all kinds of funk. So if I end up failing to keep one alive I would like to keep a species that is equally as entertaining, and can also eat whatever betta food is left. I love the idea of a single paradise fish, but I'm getting conflicting information on tank size; as well as proper temperature.
Would a 10 gallon be too small? And what temperature should I keep the tank around?
Right now, I would focus more on keeping your current Betta alive. Despite, inbreeding in the more fancy bettas, they are still very hardy fish overall. As far as the paradise fish, the 10 gallon would be bare minimum in my opinion much like a 2.5 for a betta. Keep in mind that Paradise fish are much larger than Bettas and don't have the large fluffy fins to slow their swimming so they need more room. Although they have a low waste output and could technically be ok in a 10 gallon( I had one in a ten for a little while), a 15 or 20 gallon is much much better for both you and the fish so I would have to say NO. They are fine at room temp. and prefer between 70-75 but will do fine well outside those ranges.
 

TexasDomer

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Bettas can be one of the hardiest fish, so if you're having trouble keeping one, we can help you get to the bottom of that issue rather than trading it out for a less hardy species (like sparkling gouramis, which can be harder to care for than bettas).
 
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RachelNoel

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TexasDomer said:
Bettas can be one of the hardiest fish, so if you're having trouble keeping one, we can help you get to the bottom of that issue rather than trading it out for a less hardy species (like sparkling gouramis, which can be harder to care for than bettas).
Caleb Smith said:
Right now, I would focus more on keeping your current Betta alive. Despite, inbreeding in the more fancy bettas, they are still very hardy fish overall. As far as the paradise fish, the 10 gallon would be bare minimum in my opinion much like a 2.5 for a betta. Keep in mind that Paradise fish are much larger than Bettas and don't have the large fluffy fins to slow their swimming so they need more room. Although they have a low waste output and could technically be ok in a 10 gallon( I had one in a ten for a little while), a 15 or 20 gallon is much much better for both you and the fish so I would have to say NO. They are fine at room temp. and prefer between 70-75 but will do fine well outside those ranges.
I don't have the tank or the betta yet. Just thinking about the potential future. So paradise fish are out of the question.
I love sparkling gouramis. But I've never seen them in a pet store.
And I also like guppies but they seem to have messed up gene pools as well.
I still have my heart set on a betta though. But if I somehow keep ending up with messed up bettas I would like a "backup" fish.
 
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RachelNoel

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I do live in Florida so I think our water is decently hard.

So how many hypothetical male guppies could I keep in a 10g?
 

chromedome52

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Let's go back to the beginning. There is nothing wrong with keeping a single Paradise Fish in a 10 gallon tank. As a single/"pet" fish, that is more than adequate. It is not an active species, and does not need to do that much swimming around. They are a very hardy species. I wouldn't bother with a heater. Their native habitat is very shallow waters in rice paddies, so the temperature can go to 90+ during the day and still cool to as low as 65 at night. So that's a daily temperature change of more than 20 degrees F. I've seen them wintered in ponds that froze over, and they bred the next spring.
 
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RachelNoel

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chromedome52 said:
Let's go back to the beginning. There is nothing wrong with keeping a single Paradise Fish in a 10 gallon tank. As a single/"pet" fish, that is more than adequate. It is not an active species, and does not need to do that much swimming around. They are a very hardy species. I wouldn't bother with a heater. Their native habitat is very shallow waters in rice paddies, so the temperature can go to 90+ during the day and still cool to as low as 65 at night. So that's a daily temperature change of more than 20 degrees F. I've seen them wintered in ponds that froze ov
well now I don't know what to think.
 
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