Outdoor Plant Pond/Tub Project

MaximumRide14

Hey guys, with school being online and now more time at home, I've been seriously considering making an outdoor aquarium plant pond. The sole purpose of this project would be to grow more plants to sell. I know a place getting rid of large tubs perfect for what I need, so I'm all set with that. I have a few questions though. What size CO2 canister would I need for a 200 gallon tub? I really want to make this outdoors since maybe the sun could be enough light (like how Vishaquatics does it) but I'm concerned heat with cause problems. Right now, it's 107 outside, and it stays consistently over 110 in the afternoons here until maybe mid-August. I'm guessing this is too hot to grow plants outdoors. How long should the plants be exposed to direct sunlight? I'm trying to find the best location for the tub in my backyard depending on how much light would be too much or too little. Using sunlight would save me the cost of purchasing expensive lights, but in the case that heat is too much of an issue, what brands/sizes of lights would you recommend? Additionally, what sort of filtration would be most suitable for distributing CO2 and breaking the water surface? I've seen some people use guppies to prevent mosquitos and larvae, so I might do that as well.
Thank you very much!
 

Foxxway

I've never used Co2. My water hyacinth grows really crazy during sunny, hot days. The bigger tub/stock tank you have, the better as it keeps from having wild temp swings. keeping snails and fish in there are great because they gently "prune" plants, keep mosquito larvae in check.
Get a good pump too, especially if you're putting large fish in there.
 
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MaximumRide14

I've never used Co2. My water hyacinth grows really crazy during sunny, hot days. The bigger tub/stock tank you have, the better as it keeps from having wild temp swings. keeping snails and fish in there are great because they gently "prune" plants, keep mosquito larvae in check.
Get a good pump too, especially if you're putting large fish in there.
Do you recommend a pump over a filter? Tbh I'm a little worried about the plants melting or something in the heat lol. I'd put guppies and snails in it too but I don't know if it'll be too hot for them.
 
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Foxxway

How you do this depends on your financial situation honestly.
If you have the dough, get a pump and filter box and spring for the nozzle kit. My first pump in the 110 Gal pond had this and I ran tubing up to a biofilter I made from a deck planter (the kind that sits on a 2x4). I drilled a few holes for a water fall effect, filled with lava rock, pea gravel, batting and scrubbie sponges I got from dollar store.
Originally, it was an aquaponic pond, so the biofilter had plants that gave a last filter before flowing back into pond.
I'm going to post some pics.
As my "feeder" goldfish I got for 10 cents each became behmoths, I bought another, stronger pump. I made my own filter box for it using plastic basket I got from dollar store and filling it with batting and/or filter material I bought online. (If using quilt batting, make sure it's not fireproof. The coating hurts the fish).
I had looked at floating planters as well but couldn't see paying $30 or more for them. Again, I got a few items from dollar store and, for $3, I made a floating planter! Just buy a pool noodle, basket of your choice and floral wire.
I dumbly put my pond outside on the south side and it's getting pretty hot. For the most part, the mutt guppies, snails and huge goldfish haven't had issues. The water hyacinth LOVE it, but it also makes the water green in the smaller tubs without serious filtration.
The water moss is growing well, Elodea and other stuff. There's even a frog that prefers the smaller tubs come and scare the out of me every night, lol.

I hope this helps you and I'm happy to answer any questions.
 

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MaximumRide14

How you do this depends on your financial situation honestly.
If you have the dough, get a pump and filter box and spring for the nozzle kit. My first pump in the 110 Gal pond had this and I ran tubing up to a biofilter I made from a deck planter (the kind that sits on a 2x4). I drilled a few holes for a water fall effect, filled with lava rock, pea gravel, batting and scrubbie sponges I got from dollar store.
Originally, it was an aquaponic pond, so the biofilter had plants that gave a last filter before flowing back into pond.
I'm going to post some pics.
As my "feeder" goldfish I got for 10 cents each became behmoths, I bought another, stronger pump. I made my own filter box for it using plastic basket I got from dollar store and filling it with batting and/or filter material I bought online. (If using quilt batting, make sure it's not fireproof. The coating hurts the fish).
I had looked at floating planters as well but couldn't see paying $30 or more for them. Again, I got a few items from dollar store and, for $3, I made a floating planter! Just buy a pool noodle, basket of your choice and floral wire.
I dumbly put my pond outside on the south side and it's getting pretty hot. For the most part, the mutt guppies, snails and huge goldfish haven't had issues. The water hyacinth LOVE it, but it also makes the water green in the smaller tubs without serious filtration.
The water moss is growing well, Elodea and other stuff. There's even a frog that prefers the smaller tubs come and scare the **** out of me every night, lol.

I hope this helps you and I'm happy to answer any questions.
Wow yours looks great!! Because I'm not really planning on putting fish in it (if anything, maybe a couple guppies once it's cooler) I was only going to buy the air pump (looking around 100W, but I might need a bigger one) for water movement. I'm not really going for looks with this pond, it's really for more space for my plants to grow. If I can count on sunlight, then I won't have to invest in expensive lighting for a big aquarium indoors. If the tank becomes established enough with growing plants, then I might consider some small fish. It's good to know your plant didn't have troubles in hotter water... I know I keep repeating myself but that's my biggest worry with this. How hot is it where you are? I'm still not certain how big the tub will be exactly but I'm planning for one around 150-170 gallons.
Maybe as a test I'll put a plant in a small container with soil and a gravel cap to see how it lasts. If it makes it through the next three days, then hopefully I can be assured that the plants can grow in the heat. However, I know the water will be warmer than usual because the water in the tub would be cooler.
 
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Foxxway

I'm in Mo and the temp swings a lot from wicked hot to cold. One day, the water temp got 99 degrees. For extra hot days, I'm going to put in a one gallon ice cube because changing water costs a lot more. Just make sure it's chlorine free. I bought a filter that goes on the hose that removes most chemicals to keep it safe for the plants, fish and snails.
Getting a fast-growing floating plant like water hyacinth (if it's not illegal in your state) really helps with water temp. They really soak up the sun and water so less gets to the water column.
 
Upvote 0

MaximumRide14

I'm in Mo and the temp swings a lot from wicked hot to cold. One day, the water temp got 99 degrees. For extra hot days, I'm going to put in a one gallon ice cube because changing water costs a lot more. Just make sure it's chlorine free. I bought a filter that goes on the hose that removes most chemicals to keep it safe for the plants, fish and snails.
Getting a fast-growing floating plant like water hyacinth (if it's not illegal in your state) really helps with water temp. They really soak up the sun and water so less gets to the water column.
I've got a lot of duckweed, so I might give that a shot. Tomorrow I'm going to try putting a few plants in a ten gallon and see if they melt. I could try putting the tank in more shade, but I'm not sure if that'll be worse for the plants even though the water would be cooler?
 
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