Opinions on divided betta tank??

FishFor2018

Member
Hello fellow fish lovers!
I found someone who rescued four bettas and no longer has the time for them so they are trying to re home and i figured why not lol. They have a ten gallon and a 5 gallon but i was thinking i could just divide the ten gallon and take two of them. i plan on making the divider myself as the last divider i bought didnt work well even though it as a long time ago i had it. I was thinking to make it out of the craft mesh, a few suction cups, and the sliding bars from report covers (i found this idea from aquaticGold) im hoping to get a darker color but im also going to try to grow moss on the mesh so its like a plant wall and they wont see each other. ill have two sponge filters for either side and one heater. I know some people say that it stresses them out to much to be in the same tank, what is your opinion on divided betta tanks and why? Im fine with just having one betta but i would love if i could take two of their hands.
 

betta06

Member
IME the fish do not seem to notice there are other fish so i think it workes okay.
I am actually making a divided 10 gallon right now useing craft mesh dividers wich i will be getting set up today so we will see how that turns out.. good idea on growing a moss wall that would look super cool
 

John58ford

Member
The divider using knitting mesh was written up here too, it used to be a sticky in the betta section.

I personally do not have divided tanks, but I run almost exclusively nano tanks and the concepts are very similar in basic concept. I do have one tank slated to be divided but it is waiting on a different project first.


I think bio wise there's not much load so the water would be healthy down to 3-5 gallons per fish with regular maintenance.

It's boredom, and layout that cause the issues when you start reducing horizontal swim space for betta, I've seen this moving my larger community tank conditioned betta fish back down into ~5 gallon betta tanks while overhauling or experimenting with stocking. Tail bitting, ramming and spinning become common place if not set up right. Betta are pretty awful at swimming vertically until they are well conditioned to it, using a good amount of planting to break up the swimming space will make the area more complex for them and they may not get bored as quickly, this can encourage depth swimming as well. I point this out as a divided tank is almost always deeper than long (as are my cylinder tanks) so it's something to consider while you layout and scape. Tall thin plants that reach to the surface like rotala or ludwiga are helpful in setting up lap swim scenarios, you can plant them like rows of hedges, or let them hit the top and tree off to get a natural obstacle course. In general, I avoid big hard scape features that reduce usable swimming area too in favor of tunnels of plants/leaves, and that would be especially important to me in a divided tank situation, big rock scapes are pretty, but they limit stocking to a point as well as reduce water volume.
 
  • Thread Starter

FishFor2018

Member
John58ford said:
The divider using knitting mesh was written up here too, it used to be a sticky in the betta section.

I personally do not have divided tanks, but I run almost exclusively nano tanks and the concepts are very similar in basic concept. I do have one tank slated to be divided but it is waiting on a different project first.


I think bio wise there's not much load so the water would be healthy down to 3-5 gallons per fish with regular maintenance.

It's boredom, and layout that cause the issues when you start reducing horizontal swim space for betta, I've seen this moving my larger community tank conditioned betta fish back down into ~5 gallon betta tanks while overhauling or experimenting with stocking. Tail bitting, ramming and spinning become common place if not set up right. Betta are pretty awful at swimming vertically until they are well conditioned to it, using a good amount of planting too break up the swimming space will make the area more complex for them and they may not get bored as quickly, this can encourage depth swimming as well. I point this out as a divided tank is almost always deeper than long (as are my cylinder tanks) so it's something to consider while you layout and scape. Tall thin plants that reach to the surface like rotala or ludwiga are helpful in setting up lap swim scenarios, you can plant them like rows of hedges, or let them hit the top and tree off to get a natural obstacle course. In general, I avoid big hard scape features that reduce usable swimming area too in favor of tunnels of plants/leaves, and that would be especially important to me in a divided tank situation, big rock scapes are pretty, but they limit stocking to a point as well as reduce water volume.
Okay, I was thinking of putting a drogon stone or two in either side, should I just skip that and keep just plants and maybe a little hide like a terracotta pot for them? Would a small spiderwood be okay to put in or would it take up swimming space still? I’m thinking of using hornwort, spiky moss, water wisteria, frogbit, and a Mario moss ball for either side.
 

John58ford

Member
FishFor2018 said:
Okay, I was thinking of putting a drogon stone or two in either side, should I just skip that and keep just plants and maybe a little hide like a terracotta pot for them? Would a small spiderwood be okay to put in or would it take up swimming space still? I’m thinking of using hornwort, spiky moss, water wisteria, frogbit, and a Mario moss ball for either side.
Dragon stone is beautiful, you can still get it to fit in the tank, just not a 1liter bottle size column of it. Try using smaller (soap bar size) chunks in a cluster on the bottom to give the tank a larger scale feel. Spiderwood, if it's shaped right for the tank space and fairly snag free is a good obstacle to encourage lap swim. The hides can be fun to design. I use flat prices of basalt to make hide/caves but it's a theme throughout my fish room, if you use terracotta regularly, your plan sounds like a nice divided tank.
 

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