One Neon Tetra Hiding

Aqua_novice
  • #1
Hey guys,

I am worried that one of my neon tetras will die. It is constantly hiding under a rock and not eating. It is a lot skinnier than the rest of my tetras (5 of them) and has weaker colors. They are in 20 gallon tank together with 6 cory pandas, 3 mollies, one bristlenose pleco and some shrimp and snails. When I shut the lights out, tetra that is hiding comes out from his hiding place.
I got this tank with 1 older neon tetra and wanted to get him some company, and it is possible that older tetra attacked hiding one, but I'm not sure.
I have another 5 gallon tank with one betta and few snails in, but I don't have hospital tank.
Any advice?
 
Advertisement
richiep
  • #2
You'd think if it not eating and going thin you'd be looking at some sort of parasite but the fact he comes out at lights out seems to go towards he's hiding from bullying , try dropping some food in at lights out and see if he tries to eat, it's just my thoughts
 
LoveMyFish77
  • #3
Hey guys,

I am worried that one of my neon tetras will die. It is constantly hiding under a rock and not eating. It is a lot skinnier than the rest of my tetras (5 of them) and has weaker colors. They are in 20 gallon tank together with 6 cory pandas, 3 mollies, one bristlenose pleco and some shrimp and snails. When I shut the lights out, tetra that is hiding comes out from his hiding place.
I got this tank with 1 older neon tetra and wanted to get him some company, and it is possible that older tetra attacked hiding one, but I'm not sure.
I have another 5 gallon tank with one betta and few snails in, but I don't have hospital tank.
Any advice?

So I've actually had this exact thing happen a while back with the exact same kind of fish, and I was just as worried as you are. However, neon tetras, in my experience, tend to be a little more docile (except for one specific case I remember lol). I'm thinking maybe he's been nipped at a little and is just hiding. Another possibility is maybe the tank light is too bright? You could try covering part of the light with electrical tape or something to dI'm it a bit. Also make sure there are plenty of decorations that are easy to hide in. The fish I had that behaved this way eventually became braver (or the bullying fish stopped bullying him) and he came out of his hiding place even with the light on. I found, also, that he wouldn't come out to eat with the others, but he was actually just eating the left over food on the floor. He lived like 4 years so obviously hiding and not eating at the same time as everyone else doesn't necessarily mean he's sick.

THAT BEING SAI definitely watch him for other signs of disease. Cottony growths, fraying fins, white spots, long and stringy poop, bloating, pine-cone scales, difficulty swimming, etc. The earlier you catch disease, the more likely you are to cure it. So I would make sure you have some medication in your arsenal (which is always good to have anyways because those symptoms can appear overnight in fish) and just watch him very carefully for changes in appearance and behavior.

One other possibility is your tank sounds very overstocked. 15 fish in a 20 gallon tank is a lot, and it may be too much for your filtration system which can cause unhealthy water conditions that stress out your fish. Do you have a test kit? I would definitely test water parameters like ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and pH for starters. Ammonia and nitrite should be 0 ideally and pH should be around 7.0. If the levels are off but you don't want to return any fish, I would recommend buying a more powerful filter like the Marineland Penguin Power Filter. I use it for my 20 gallon tank and it works spectacularly. Also consider buying ammonia-absorbing media like the Fluval Ammonia Remover. This remover goes directly into the filter and does an amazing job at clearing out ammonia. Make sure you do water changes regularly and any time the ammonia is out of whack, and never change all filter cartridges at the same time as this will destroy your bacteria colonies which are crucial in controlling ammonia and nitrites.

I hope this helps! Keep us updated!
 
Advertisement
Aqua_novice
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
You'd think if it not eating and going thin you'd be looking at some sort of parasite but the fact he comes out at lights out seems to go towards he's hiding from bullying , try dropping some food in at lights out and see if he tries to eat, it's just my thoughts

Yes it did come out at night. It actually got out today a bit more during lights on period and it seems like he was ready to join his crew but he wasn't eating during feeding time, I hope he starts eating soon.

So I've actually had this exact thing happen a while back with the exact same kind of fish, and I was just as worried as you are. However, neon tetras, in my experience, tend to be a little more docile (except for one specific case I remember lol). I'm thinking maybe he's been nipped at a little and is just hiding. Another possibility is maybe the tank light is too bright? You could try covering part of the light with electrical tape or something to dI'm it a bit. Also make sure there are plenty of decorations that are easy to hide in. The fish I had that behaved this way eventually became braver (or the bullying fish stopped bullying him) and he came out of his hiding place even with the light on. I found, also, that he wouldn't come out to eat with the others, but he was actually just eating the left over food on the floor. He lived like 4 years so obviously hiding and not eating at the same time as everyone else doesn't necessarily mean he's sick.

THAT BEING SAI definitely watch him for other signs of disease. Cottony growths, fraying fins, white spots, long and stringy poop, bloating, pine-cone scales, difficulty swimming, etc. The earlier you catch disease, the more likely you are to cure it. So I would make sure you have some medication in your arsenal (which is always good to have anyways because those symptoms can appear overnight in fish) and just watch him very carefully for changes in appearance and behavior.

One other possibility is your tank sounds very overstocked. 15 fish in a 20 gallon tank is a lot, and it may be too much for your filtration system which can cause unhealthy water conditions that stress out your fish. Do you have a test kit? I would definitely test water parameters like ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and pH for starters. Ammonia and nitrite should be 0 ideally and pH should be around 7.0. If the levels are off but you don't want to return any fish, I would recommend buying a more powerful filter like the Marineland Penguin Power Filter. I use it for my 20 gallon tank and it works spectacularly. Also consider buying ammonia-absorbing media like the Fluval Ammonia Remover. This remover goes directly into the filter and does an amazing job at clearing out ammonia. Make sure you do water changes regularly and any time the ammonia is out of whack, and never change all filter cartridges at the same time as this will destroy your bacteria colonies which are crucial in controlling ammonia and nitrites.

I hope this helps! Keep us updated!

Well I'm not sure if lights are problem here because other tetras and fish seem fine with it. Tank has plenty of decorations and plants so they can have their own space once they are fed up with each other
I don't think my tank is overstocked. I forgot to mention there are few guppies as well, but they are all small fish that don't grow much more than an inch (except for pleco). Tank is a little bit bigger than 20 gals, it's around 23 gallons but it isn't filled to the top. I got this tank used and it was in terrible condition when I got it. There were almost no plants, filter wasn't set up properly and it wasn't cleaned in a while. It was running for almost a year when I got it. There were at least 60 guppies in it, but I gave a lot away. I think my filter is strong enough as well, it's aquael powerhead with max flow rate of 130 gallons. Since getting that tank, I swapped gravel for sand to get cories. Now I'm worried for cories a bit, I noticed that some have damaged tails and one has damaged dorsal fin. I did notice that baby guppies tend to nibble on poor guys . As for tetra, it got out today and started to swim with his buddies but still didn't eat. I hope he starts eating soon...
 
richiep
  • #5
Best of luck
 
Advertisement
LoveMyFish77
  • #6
Yes it did come out at night. It actually got out today a bit more during lights on period and it seems like he was ready to join his crew but he wasn't eating during feeding time, I hope he starts eating soon.



Well I'm not sure if lights are problem here because other tetras and fish seem fine with it. Tank has plenty of decorations and plants so they can have their own space once they are fed up with each other
I don't think my tank is overstocked. I forgot to mention there are few guppies as well, but they are all small fish that don't grow much more than an inch (except for pleco). Tank is a little bit bigger than 20 gals, it's around 23 gallons but it isn't filled to the top. I got this tank used and it was in terrible condition when I got it. There were almost no plants, filter wasn't set up properly and it wasn't cleaned in a while. It was running for almost a year when I got it. There were at least 60 guppies in it, but I gave a lot away. I think my filter is strong enough as well, it's aquael powerhead with max flow rate of 130 gallons. Since getting that tank, I swapped gravel for sand to get cories. Now I'm worried for cories a bit, I noticed that some have damaged tails and one has damaged dorsal fin. I did notice that baby guppies tend to nibble on poor guys . As for tetra, it got out today and started to swim with his buddies but still didn't eat. I hope he starts eating soon...


Did you check your water parameters?
 
Aqua_novice
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
Best of luck
Thanks

Did you check your water parameters?
I have test strips and I checked with them. There is no ammonia test on them tho... Nitrites are at 0, and nitrates at around 80.
I know nitrates are high and I am trying to lower them for a while now with water changes. When I first tested tank after I got it, it had over 250 nitrates if I remember correctly.
Today I did one water change and I am planning on doing one more during weekend.
 
Advertisement
LoveMyFish77
  • #8
Thanks

Even small amounts of ammonia can cause fish stress and significantly reduce their ability to fight disease.

I have test strips and I checked with them. There is no ammonia test on them tho... Nitrites are at 0, and nitrates at around 80.
I know nitrates are high and I am trying to lower them for a while now with water changes. When I first tested tank after I got it, it had over 250 nitrates if I remember correctly.
Today I did one water change and I am planning on doing one more during weekend.
Thanks


I have test strips and I checked with them. There is no ammonia test on them tho... Nitrites are at 0, and nitrates at around 80.
I know nitrates are high and I am trying to lower them for a while now with water changes. When I first tested tank after I got it, it had over 250 nitrates if I remember correctly.
Today I did one water change and I am planning on doing one more during weekend.

Even a small amount of ammonia can cause fish stress and significantly decrease their ability to fight infections. If your cories have damaged fins, they are at a much higher risk of developing an infection/fin rot when they are stressed out due to poor water quality. In my opinion, every freshwater aquarium owner must have a way to test ammonia because it can so easily wreak havoc on the health of your fish. I highly recommend getting the API ammonia test kit or the API master test kit. I have both and they are more reliable than test strips and last a long time. I suspect your tank may have ammonia problems that are stressing your fish out, and your cories may be showing signs of fin rot already. At your earliest convenience, go buy an ammonia test kit and measure it, and if there is any ammonia in your tank, start doing daily water changes until it's under control. A have several tips for controlling ammonia, but I'll save that for when you get it tested in case ammonia isn't a problem for you.

Also, you might consider buying ammo lock while you're at the store getting an ammonia test kit. Ammo lock instantly detoxifies ammonia, but does not remove it so it's really a temporary fix for emergency situations. So let's say you test your water and ammonia is at like 2.0, which is a dangerously high amount. That would be a good time to throw some ammo lock in until you gain control of the ammonia.

Edit: I'm not nearly as concerned about nitrates as I am about ammonia. Nitrates are an indication of ammonia breakdown and aren't, in themselves, toxic (though you should not ignore them). But ammonia is way way way more of a concern than nitrates, so get that tested!

Edit 2: the forum automatically linked the ammo lock mentioned above to an Amazon page for ammo lock POND. Don't buy that one lol. There's an ammo lock specifically for freshwater too

Edit 3: I attached a picture of the guide book included in my API master test kit showing the effects of ammonia and nitrates, in case you don't want to take a stranger's word for it
 

Attachments

  • 20190326_180119.jpg
    20190326_180119.jpg
    92.8 KB · Views: 91
  • 20190326_175832.jpg
    20190326_175832.jpg
    86 KB · Views: 75
Aqua_novice
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
Even a small amount of ammonia can cause fish stress and significantly decrease their ability to fight infections. If your cories have damaged fins, they are at a much higher risk of developing an infection/fin rot when they are stressed out due to poor water quality. In my opinion, every freshwater aquarium owner must have a way to test ammonia because it can so easily wreak havoc on the health of your fish. I highly recommend getting the API ammonia test kit or the API master test kit. I have both and they are more reliable than test strips and last a long time. I suspect your tank may have ammonia problems that are stressing your fish out, and your cories may be showing signs of fin rot already. At your earliest convenience, go buy an ammonia test kit and measure it, and if there is any ammonia in your tank, start doing daily water changes until it's under control. A have several tips for controlling ammonia, but I'll save that for when you get it tested in case ammonia isn't a problem for you.

Also, you might consider buying ammo lock while you're at the store getting an ammonia test kit. Ammo lock instantly detoxifies ammonia, but does not remove it so it's really a temporary fix for emergency situations. So let's say you test your water and ammonia is at like 2.0, which is a dangerously high amount. That would be a good time to throw some ammo lock in until you gain control of the ammonia.

Edit: I'm not nearly as concerned about nitrates as I am about ammonia. Nitrates are an indication of ammonia breakdown and aren't, in themselves, toxic (though you should not ignore them). But ammonia is way way way more of a concern than nitrates, so get that tested!

Edit 2: the forum automatically linked the ammo lock mentioned above to an Amazon page for ammo lock POND. Don't buy that one lol. There's an ammo lock specifically for freshwater too

Edit 3: I attached a picture of the guide book included in my API master test kit showing the effects of ammonia and nitrates, in case you don't want to take a stranger's word for it

Thank you for your quick answer. Yes I'm aware that every hobbyist should have ammonia test. I wanted to buy API test kit but they aren't available in my country. Tried ebay as well and most don't ship to my country. Those that do calculated that import taxes and shipping are going to be more than twice as expensive as test kit. The only test kit that I could order is JBL test kit, but it would cost me over 100 dollars which I can't afford right now. I'm aware that ammonia is bad for any tank but it's really expensive to get test kits in my country. I can't take my water for testing to LFS because they don't test their water as well...
 
LoveMyFish77
  • #10
Geez, that's really frustrating... No pet stores sell ammonia kits?? Besides the $100 one
 
Advertisement
Aqua_novice
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
Geez, that's really frustrating... No pet stores sell ammonia kits?? Besides the $100 one
Yeah it really is there are single ammonia test but last few months were rough and I can't really afford a lot right now...
I want to buy one as soon as I'm going to be able to afford it, and I hope it will be soon.
 
LoveMyFish77
  • #12
Yeah it really is there are single ammonia test but last few months were rough and I can't really afford a lot right now...
I want to buy one as soon as I'm going to be able to afford it, and I hope it will be soon.

Well in that case I strongly urge you to treat this as an ammonia problem because it's better to be safe than sorry! I would not add any more fish, because I do think you have too many... Be careful about overfeeding--this leads to ammonia spikes! I think the rule is feed as much as they will eat in 2 minutes twice a day. Also, do frequent partial water changes and always net out visible waste before it has a chance to decompose into ammonia. Never change all filter cartridges at the same time--I've made that mistake before and it took two weeks of daily water changes and ammo lock to control the ammonia until bacterial colonies could reestablish themselves.

You said you have sand rather than gravel?
 
Aqua_novice
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
Well in that case I strongly urge you to treat this as an ammonia problem because it's better to be safe than sorry! I would not add any more fish, because I do think you have too many... Be careful about overfeeding--this leads to ammonia spikes! I think the rule is feed as much as they will eat in 2 minutes twice a day. Also, do frequent partial water changes and always net out visible waste before it has a chance to decompose into ammonia. Never change all filter cartridges at the same time--I've made that mistake before and it took two weeks of daily water changes and ammo lock to control the ammonia until bacterial colonies could reestablish themselves.

You said you have sand rather than gravel?
I guess it would be best to treat it as ammonia problem. I am going to do partial water changes for some time probably daily. Yea I wasn't planning on adding any more fish. I normally feed once a day, but mollies are such pigs that they continue to eat cory wafers that I use. I think I'm going to start feeding them with wafers every other day just to stop mollies from pigging out. Ceramic rings in filter are pretty much new so I think I won't need to replace them for a while.

Yes I have sand in my tank.
 
Advertisement
LoveMyFish77
  • #14
I guess it would be best to treat it as ammonia problem. I am going to do partial water changes for some time probably daily. Yea I wasn't planning on adding any more fish. I normally feed once a day, but mollies are such pigs that they continue to eat cory wafers that I use. I think I'm going to start feeding them with wafers every other day just to stop mollies from pigging out. Ceramic rings in filter are pretty much new so I think I won't need to replace them for a while.

Yes I have sand in my tank.

So I did some research and it looks like a gravel vac should work fine with sand. If you don't have one, I highly recommend getting one of those--they're cheap, last forever, and do a great job at sucking up waste that's hidden in the sand.
 
Aqua_novice
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
So I did some research and it looks like a gravel vac should work fine with sand. If you don't have one, I highly recommend getting one of those--they're cheap, last forever, and do a great job at sucking up waste that's hidden in the sand.
Yes I use it to clean sand although my sand is very fine and I can't clean it like you would clean gravel. It's okay because fish waste doesn't go through it, it stays on top of sand so I just go over top of the sand and suck up all of fish waste.
I just did another water change, treated my water with seachem prime. I added prime to tank directly as well because it says it makes ammonia safe for fish for a while.
 
H2oAngels
  • #16
Yes I use it to clean sand although my sand is very fine and I can't clean it like you would clean gravel. It's okay because fish waste doesn't go through it, it stays on top of sand so I just go over top of the sand and suck up all of fish waste.
I just did another water change, treated my water with seachem prime. I added prime to tank directly as well because it says it makes ammonia safe for fish for a while.

I am currently cycling my tank with my fish in it ( I had about 5 percent of knowledge I have now 11 days ago.) I would recommend a 50 percent change daily (I do 2 25 percents a day if I’m feeling lazy). Luckily you have a 20 gallon so they the changes aren’t all that much work. 12 days into my tank and I’ve done around 25 water changes. I do demolition for a living, we're taught to treat every pipe and wire as if it were live. Being that you have no ammonia testing ability your best bet is to treat it as though that is the problem. If nothing else your fish will have really clean water until you can get it tested. They won’t be mad at you for it. Neutralize the most lethal risk and take it from there.
 
Aqua_novice
  • Thread Starter
  • #17
I am currently cycling my tank with my fish in it ( I had about 5 percent of knowledge I have now 11 days ago.) I would recommend a 50 percent change daily (I do 2 25 percents a day if I’m feeling lazy). Luckily you have a 20 gallon so they the changes aren’t all that much work. 12 days into my tank and I’ve done around 25 water changes. I do demolition for a living, we're taught to treat every pipe and wire as if it were live. Being that you have no ammonia testing ability your best bet is to treat it as though that is the problem. If nothing else your fish will have really clean water until you can get it tested. They won’t be mad at you for it. Neutralize the most lethal risk and take it from there.
I just did water around 30% water change and it seems my cories aren't doing really good. All of them have their dorsal fins down and they go to get air at surface often. I don't think this is due to ammonia because I just did water change and I dropped some of the seachem prime in tank directly. They look like they are pretty weak. I don't get it, this set up was running fine for more than a month... One cory didn't even move when there was shrimp on him. Every other fish (except for one neon tetra that is still hiding) is active and doing fine.
EDIT: they didn't eat today as well...
 
richiep
  • #18
Reading through all this no one as suggested testing your tap water for nitrates, if the problem is reoccurring after water changes its saying to me something is wrong there, I'd do a nitrait test there, if you had ammonia problems something should have shown on the test plus most fish can tolerate a little ammonia which should have shown, you have shrimp in the tank which as a shrimp keeper can tell you ammonia is deadly to them and they would be dead by now if it was ammonia, how much prime are you using for the ammo t of water bring changed
 
Aqua_novice
  • Thread Starter
  • #19
Reading through all this no one as suggested testing your tap water for nitrates, if the problem is reoccurring after water changes its saying to me something is wrong there, I'd do a nitrait test there, if you had ammonia problems something should have shown on the test plus most fish can tolerate a little ammonia which should have shown, you have shrimp in the tank which as a shrimp keeper can tell you ammonia is deadly to them and they would be dead by now if it was ammonia, how much prime are you using for the ammo t of water bring changed
I did test my tap water for nitrates and it came out around 25. It does say that seachem prime detoxifies ammonia, nitrates and nitrite tho...
I noticed that baby guppies tend to bite on cories now and then. Could it be that they are all stressed because of guppies? Should I move babies in with 5 gallon betta tank?
 
richiep
  • #20
let me call DoubleDutch to ask him he'd know more on that, double dutch could you read the above post ive linked and give advice on please
I did test my tap water for nitrates and it came out around 25. It does say that seachem prime detoxifies ammonia, nitrates and nitrite tho...
I noticed that baby guppies tend to bite on cories now and then. Could it be that they are all stressed because of guppies? Should I move babies in with 5 gallon betta tank?
 
DoubleDutch
  • #21
let me call DoubleDutch to ask him he'd know more on that, double dutch could you read the above post ive linked and give advice on please
Sorry Richie. Can't really tell.
If waterparameters wouldn't be good I'd expect them all to behave like this.
 
Morpheus1967
  • #22
I guess it would be best to treat it as ammonia problem. I am going to do partial water changes for some time probably daily. Yea I wasn't planning on adding any more fish. I normally feed once a day, but mollies are such pigs that they continue to eat cory wafers that I use. I think I'm going to start feeding them with wafers every other day just to stop mollies from pigging out. Ceramic rings in filter are pretty much new so I think I won't need to replace them for a while.

Yes I have sand in my tank.

See the part I bolded. When you say new, do you mean you replaced them? What exactly is in your filter? This could be the issue if you replaced everything and did not keep any of the old stuff. Your tank could be cycling all over.
 
Aqua_novice
  • Thread Starter
  • #23
Sorry Richie. Can't really tell.
If waterparameters wouldn't be good I'd expect them all to behave like this.
That's what I expected as well... They are hiding right now throughout aquarium. Could it be that small guppies stressed them and ripped their fins?

See the part I bolded. When you say new, do you mean you replaced them? What exactly is in your filter? This could be the issue if you replaced everything and did not keep any of the old stuff. Your tank could be cycling all over.
Filter has a sponge on the intake and most of the time I only clean the sponge in aquarium water when flow reduces. What I mean by new ceramic rings is that ceramic rings that came with filter were in plastic (not mash) bag and person that had tank before me just put ceramic rings together with plastic bag inside filter. To me it didn't really make sense because water doesn't flow through them when they are in bag so I just took them out. That was more than a month and a half ago. Since then nothing new was introduced to filter. Just regular prefilter sponge cleaning.

I should mention that I messed up my knee a month ago so I couldn't really do weekly water changes and I did water change every other week. Also a week ago I noticed that of 3 mollies, 2 were males. I told lady in fish store that I want one male and two females but she messed up. They fought today and they have one or two scales missing.

Just wanted to let you all know about everything going on with tank, it could be relevant.
 
DoubleDutch
  • #24
That's what I expected as well... They are hiding right now throughout aquarium. Could it be that small guppies stressed them and ripped their fins?


Filter has a sponge on the intake and most of the time I only clean the sponge in aquarium water when flow reduces. What I mean by new ceramic rings is that ceramic rings that came with filter were in plastic (not mash) bag and person that had tank before me just put ceramic rings together with plastic bag inside filter which. To me it didn't really make sense because water doesn't flow through them when they are in bag so I just took them out. That was more than a month and a half ago. Since then nothing new was introduced to filter. Just regular prefilter sponge cleaning.

I should mention that I messed up my knee a month ago so I couldn't really do weekly water changes and I did water change every other week. Also a week ago I noticed that of 3 mollies, 2 were males. I told lady in fish store that I want one male and two females but she messed up. They fought today and they have one or two scales missing.

Just wanted to let you all know about everything going on with tank, it could be relevant.
Think it has to do with the poor quality of neons and the suspecion of all kinds of issues by the way beijg bred (columnaris = false NTD for instance)
 
LoveMyFish77
  • #25
I just did water around 30% water change and it seems my cories aren't doing really good. All of them have their dorsal fins down and they go to get air at surface often. I don't think this is due to ammonia because I just did water change and I dropped some of the seachem prime in tank directly. They look like they are pretty weak. I don't get it, this set up was running fine for more than a month... One cory didn't even move when there was shrimp on him. Every other fish (except for one neon tetra that is still hiding) is active and doing fine.
EDIT: they didn't eat today as well...


Definitely sounds like fin rot unfortunately... If you can't afford medication, your best bet is lots of water changes. Unfortunately, aquarium keeping is an expensive hobby. If you lose your cories, I would not replace them. My theory is that you had an ammonia buildup before that caused stress and weakened their immune systems and they got an infection (fin rot). You're treating the ammonia now but, in my opinion, ammonia levels before you started rigorous water changes may have started this. I know you say you don't think it's overstocked, but from my experience, that many fish in that size of a tank will overwork any filtration system. So yeah I'd urge you not to buy more fish if you lose your cories. Keep the stock lower until the tank is more stable and you can afford ammonia tests. I have a 20 gallon tank and my filter can usually handle only like 10 fish, and it's a powerful filter.

Keep us updated; I'm sorry about your cories
 
Nanissa
  • #26
Neons =)
I'm so sorry hope your fish survives.
I am strongly considering getting neons. But my tank is only 10 gallon. I could probably get about 5 or 6. Are they a schooling fish and if so, would they like to be in a group of 5 or 6. I heard they are not as hardy as zebra danios. I'm hoping you can lend me some advice since oyu have some experience with neons. Or anyone who would like to comment... you are welcome! Because of my small tank size these two kind of figh might be my only options. I do love the neons but want to be sure that they have a chance. I'm a beginner and I'll be adding them to a new tank. My poor Betta fish passed away recently. So there is no fish currently in the tank. I'm still cycling it. I still have to add real plants too.
 
Aqua_novice
  • Thread Starter
  • #27
Think it has to do with the poor quality of neons and the suspecion of all kinds of issues by the way beijg bred (columnaris = false NTD for instance)
Yea a lot of people complain that quality of fish in local fish stores are terrible... It could be that they are just weak...
Definitely sounds like fin rot unfortunately... If you can't afford medication, your best bet is lots of water changes. Unfortunately, aquarium keeping is an expensive hobby. If you lose your cories, I would not replace them. My theory is that you had an ammonia buildup before that caused stress and weakened their immune systems and they got an infection (fin rot). You're treating the ammonia now but, in my opinion, ammonia levels before you started rigorous water changes may have started this. I know you say you don't think it's overstocked, but from my experience, that many fish in that size of a tank will overwork any filtration system. So yeah I'd urge you not to buy more fish if you lose your cories. Keep the stock lower until the tank is more stable and you can afford ammonia tests. I have a 20 gallon tank and my filter can usually handle only like 10 fish, and it's a powerful filter.

Keep us updated; I'm sorry about your cories
Yes it could be. I did notice that baby guppies attack corie fins all the time. I was thinking of getting a breeder box or net and put all of the baby guppies in there for now. It looks like fin rot medicine is not expensive so I'm probably going to get some. They still have their dorsal fins clamped and lost a bit of color but they are not hiding as much. Could something like this work? Separating baby guppies in breeding box so that cories have peace?

Neons =)
I'm so sorry hope your fish survives.
I am strongly considering getting neons. But my tank is only 10 gallon. I could probably get about 5 or 6. Are they a schooling fish and if so, would they like to be in a group of 5 or 6. I heard they are not as hardy as zebra danios. I'm hoping you can lend me some advice since oyu have some experience with neons. Or anyone who would like to comment... you are welcome! Because of my small tank size these two kind of figh might be my only options. I do love the neons but want to be sure that they have a chance. I'm a beginner and I'll be adding them to a new tank. My poor Betta fish passed away recently. So there is no fish currently in the tank. I'm still cycling it. I still have to add real plants too.
Yeah I hope everything is gonna be ok to. Neons do like to be kept in groups (at least 5 or 6) but I read somewhere that they like already established tanks.
Sorry for your betta
 
Nanissa
  • #28
Yea a lot of people complain that quality of fish in local fish stores are terrible... It could be that they are just weak...

Yes it could be. I did notice that baby guppies attack corie fins all the time. I was thinking of getting a breeder box or net and put all of the baby guppies in there for now. It looks like fin rot medicine is not expensive so I'm probably going to get some. They still have their dorsal fins clamped and lost a bit of color but they are not hiding as much. Could something like this work? Separating baby guppies in breeding box so that cories have peace?


Yeah I hope everything is gonna be ok to. Neons do like to be kept in groups (at least 5 or 6) but I read somewhere that they like already established tanks.
Sorry for your betta
Thank you
 
LoveMyFish77
  • #29
Yea a lot of people complain that quality of fish in local fish stores are terrible... It could be that they are just weak...

Describe the fins of your cories. Do they look ragged? Clamped fins is a classic sign of stress.

Yes it could be. I did notice that baby guppies attack corie fins all the time. I was thinking of getting a breeder box or net and put all of the baby guppies in there for now. It looks like fin rot medicine is not expensive so I'm probably going to get some. They still have their dorsal fins clamped and lost a bit of color but they are not hiding as much. Could something like this work? Separating baby guppies in breeding box so that cories have peace?


Yeah I hope everything is gonna be ok to. Neons do like to be kept in groups (at least 5 or 6) but I read somewhere that they like already established tanks.
Sorry for your betta
 

Similar Aquarium Threads

  • Locked
  • Question
Replies
12
Views
991
DoubleDutch
  • Locked
Replies
4
Views
472
Tankmandan
Replies
5
Views
975
jinjerJOSH22
Replies
6
Views
4K
FIghtingj
  • Locked
Replies
6
Views
3K
notBrandon
Advertisement


Advertisement


Top Bottom