Odd Red Tips On Ball Python Scales

Kysarkel000

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Hello, this is Ducky. She was hatched in September 2018, and she keeps developing more colors and spots as she grows.

I noticed today that she has some red tips on a few of her scales. Is this her natural coloration? Or did she get burnt on her heat mat (I do have it set up properly)? Or is she just blushing?

I know white snakes can kinda change colors (not by will necessarily) when they get warmer/cooler, and when they have bowel movements on the way, but I don't think this is it.

The picture showing her full length is to show her coloration, and my finger point is where the red scale tips are.

I just need to know if I should be concerned.

Thanks!!
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Gamer

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First off, I love the pied morphs she is an absolute beaut.

It could be UTH related. Is the heat mat regulated with a thermostat?
What type of substrate do you use?

Can't be overly concerned when comes to our beautiful BP's health. I too hope just natural coloration of some sort though.
 

Kysarkel000

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First off, I love the pied morphs she is an absolute beaut.

It could be UTH related. Is the heat mat regulated with a thermostat?
What type of substrate do you use?

Can't be overly concerned when comes to our beautiful BP's health. I too hope just natural coloration of some sort though.
Thanks, I had to have her when I saw those colors!

I have the uth on a thermostat, and I can hold my hand over the top of it with no problems for a few minutes (I could hold it there forever).

I have the tank covered with a double layer of paper towels. The breeder I got her from said to keep her on paper towels or something similar, because they always had their snakes eat too much of the loose substrate in the past.

I hope it's just natural coloration too, but I feel like it's not because she doesn't have any other areas of pink/red unless it's a pre-pigmentation to the yellow...
 

BReefer97

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They kind of do look like burns to me as well. And as for the substrate thing, I would get her on something other than paper towels. Regardless of what the breeder told you. A healthy reptile is not going to get impacted from ingesting some substrate, and if it concerns you too much you can always take her out and feed her in a bin
 

Kysarkel000

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The red color has disappeared, and I don't see any other areas of pink or red.

What would be a good substrate for her? And how thick?

Thanks again!
 

BReefer97

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The red color has disappeared, and I don't see any other areas of pink or red.

What would be a good substrate for her? And how thick?

Thanks again!
I would probably use aspen bedding and hmm, 2-3 inches thick would be best. BPs do occasionally burrow and what not because they’re a snake that likes to cram into tight spaces to feel secure and safe. She’s a beautiful snake! Maybe her scales were just irritated, who knows. Glad it’s gone though!
 

Alexolotl

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I don’t keep snakes but I’m researching them and from what I know about BPs they need fairly high humidity (60 percent MINIMUM) so I would recommend something like orchid bark maybe. Aspen doesn’t really hold humidity very well.
 

natureandwildlife

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I don’t keep snakes but I’m researching them and from what I know about BPs they need fairly high humidity (60 percent MINIMUM) so I would recommend something like orchid bark maybe. Aspen doesn’t really hold humidity very well.
I too am researching BPs because I hope to own one in the future. From my understanding, in the wild BPs live in high humidity but they have the opportunity to get away from it. You can use something like Aspen bedding and just keep a humid hide. This can just be a Tupperware container with sphagnum moss in it. Wet the moss as often as needed and keep it on the warm side. Make sure there is no excess water in the container. I learned this from Snake Discovery, her videos are so educational and entertaining! Hope this helps someone.

Also, I know that this thread is kinda of old but the reptile section on FL is not that busy. Hopefully it's ok that I comment.
 

Alexolotl

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I too am researching BPs because I hope to own one in the future. From my understanding, in the wild BPs live in high humidity but they have the opportunity to get away from it. You can use something like Aspen bedding and just keep a humid hide. This can just be a Tupperware container with sphagnum moss in it. Wet the moss as often as needed and keep it on the warm side. Make sure there is no excess water in the container. I learned this from Snake Discovery, her videos are so educational and entertaining! Hope this helps someone.

Also, I know that this thread is kinda of old but the reptile section on FL is not that busy. Hopefully it's ok that I comment.
Yes, this is definitely a thing you CAN do, but not exactly something you SHOULD do. Humid hides are supposed to be an aid during sheds, and not a place the snake has to go for humidity.
Ball pythons need a minimum 60 percent humidity in the entire enclosure at all times, higher in shed, or they risk bad sheds or worse, like respiratory infections.
Theoretically you could use aspen for this, but it molds easily and would do so at the slightest drop of water. Thus, coconut fiber is a far better choice. IMO, it also looks way nicer than aspen bedding, but that’s just my opinion.

This isn’t meant as a dig on Snake Discovery or anything. I’ve heard they generally give rather solid advice. However, from what I know about balls, humidity is a really important factor, and not one that should be skimped on; the same way one shouldn’t skimp on the temperature and PH of the water for Amazon-native fish.
 

natureandwildlife

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Yes, this is definitely a thing you CAN do, but not exactly something you SHOULD do. Humid hides are supposed to be an aid during sheds, and not a place the snake has to go for humidity.
Ball pythons need a minimum 60 percent humidity in the entire enclosure at all times, higher in shed, or they risk bad sheds or worse, like respiratory infections.
Theoretically you could use aspen for this, but it molds easily and would do so at the slightest drop of water. Thus, coconut fiber is a far better choice. IMO, it also looks way nicer than aspen bedding, but that’s just my opinion.

This isn’t meant as a dig on Snake Discovery or anything. I’ve heard they generally give rather solid advice. However, from what I know about balls, humidity is a really important factor, and not one that should be skimped on; the same way one shouldn’t skimp on the temperature and PH of the water for Amazon-native fish.
I see what you mean. This does seem to be a rather controversial topic in the reptile community. Some people think that a humid hide in a dry enclosure is beneficial, others not. I just think it's nice to be able to replicate what animals have in the wild if it's possible. Therefore, I personally agree with using a humid hide in a dry enclosure. From my understanding, Ball Pythons in the wild will hide in termite mounds during the day. These mounds have very humid air. Then during the night, Ball Pythons will come out of the termite mounds to hunt. This is how they escape the humidity. So a humid hide replicates the dark, enclosed, and humid space that a humid hide provides. However, this is just my opinion and my view on things. I think they should be able to escape the humidity as they do in the wild. Each way has their pros and cons so I guess you just have to do what's best for you.
 
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