Not sure how to relocate fish into better tank without proper equipment.

ItsEggs

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We’re kind of in a crisis, so I can’t leave the house to get proper equipment to save my little sister’s Betta. She gave it to me and it is in bad condition. It’s in really dirty water, in a bowl that I doubt is even a gallon. She got him when he was a baby, so I guess the bowl is meant for baby fish, I’m not sure. He’s adult now, but his colors are really muted and his gills are always puffed out. I have a large aquarium I can put him in, but I’m not sure how to go about helping him. I’ve done research but it’s all different with each website I go to. I’m not sure if I should leave him for now or relocate him immediately. All I have is the old fish stuff from when we used to have fish. I don’t know if the tap water is safe. I have an old bottle of water conditioner, but I also don’t know if that’s safe. I read that bettas need a heater or a consistent heat of 80F. I don’t have a tank heater, but I do have a heat Matt used for reptiles. Is that safe? I don’t really know what I’m doing and would really appreciate someone telling me what to do.
 

Bettababy99

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Hello!
okay so ive had bettas for 15 years. In my experience I only use heaters in my breeding tanks/ my community tank where my females are. I use heaters in when I'm conditioning a fish. For example i have a male with torn fins so he's in my 5 gallon with a heater. Bettas do not need a heater but its good for them. I have 8 bettas so its not easy for me to heat all of them.
do you have other fish in that tank?
bettas are pretty hardy.
I suggest filling the tank and letting it sit for 24 hours. You can use the conditioner but I usually avoid it because it's unnecessary chemicals. If the wAter has sat for 24 hours itll be okay. If the fish is in bad condition its better to try than not to try.
 

DuaneV

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Bettas need to be at 80ish degrees. A little more is better, a little less at the MOST, but I dont keep mine less than 80. The majority of issues I see people having with their Bettas are either water parameters (ammonia, nitrites or nitrates) or incorrect temps, with temp being a big one. If you arent able to keep it at a MINIMUM of 78, dont get a Betta. If you have one in bad shape, keep it at 80/82 and do water changes. If you dont have the appropriate equipment and can't buy it, dont bother. See if there is someone who CAN take care of the fish and rehome it. See if a pet shop will take it in. You taking it and putting it in a tank with water that possibly has chlorine/chloramines and no heater will be a death sentence for fish.
 

trahana

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The Temp is important, but its often thrown out of proportion. I have a six year old female betta as well as many other bettas that are in excellent condition at temps from 72-78 with NO heater. In the wild fish will never have just 80 degree stable water, they can handle and thrive a wide verity of temps. the most important thing is clean water, which is what this betta is suffering from.
Set up his new tank, use the water conditioner. You can take cup and dip your betta out of the old bowl into his new tank after the new tank has been running for several hours to 24 hours.

DuaneV You're very discouraging, don't you want to entice people into proper fish keeping instead of scaring them off with such harsh words?
 

flyinGourami

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trahana said:
The Temp is important, but its often thrown out of proportion. I have a six year old female betta as well as many other bettas that are in excellent condition at temps from 72-78 with NO heater. In the wild fish will never have just 80 degree stable water, they can handle and thrive a wide verity of temps. the most important thing is clean water, which is what this betta is suffering from.
Set up his new tank, use the water conditioner. You can take cup and dip your betta out of the old bowl into his new tank after the new tank has been running for several hours to 24 hours.

DuaneV You're very discouraging, don't you want to entice people into proper fish keeping instead of scaring them off with such harsh words?
Not to be rude to anyone, but I must agree with you. Fish in the wild do not have stable temps. The tropical fish that we have? They sometimes endure temps in the wild down to 51 degrees, instead of the 76 degrees we keep them at. The fluctuations between day and night can make the temps rise and drop 7 degrees. Although I must say that temp and stable temp is important, like you have said, it is not as important as many say it is. Fish are much more durable then hobbyists often make them look. THe most important thing(again, like you have said) is clean water. By clean water, I don't mean zero nitrates. No ammonia, no nitrite, and a few other things such as a lower tds. When you look at conditions in the wild, there are often days where it will be very very cold, colder than most coldwater tanks and we are talking about tropical habitats. So, while I don't recommend keeping fish without a heater, heaters are not musts.

ItsEggs said:
We’re kind of in a crisis, so I can’t leave the house to get proper equipment to save my little sister’s Betta. She gave it to me and it is in bad condition. It’s in really dirty water, in a bowl that I doubt is even a gallon. She got him when he was a baby, so I guess the bowl is meant for baby fish, I’m not sure. He’s adult now, but his colors are really muted and his gills are always puffed out. I have a large aquarium I can put him in, but I’m not sure how to go about helping him. I’ve done research but it’s all different with each website I go to. I’m not sure if I should leave him for now or relocate him immediately. All I have is the old fish stuff from when we used to have fish. I don’t know if the tap water is safe. I have an old bottle of water conditioner, but I also don’t know if that’s safe. I read that bettas need a heater or a consistent heat of 80F. I don’t have a tank heater, but I do have a heat Matt used for reptiles. Is that safe? I don’t really know what I’m doing and would really appreciate someone telling me what to do.
For now, I would say clean water is the most important. If you have a sterilite container that is bigger and clean, you could put him in there. Like someone said, you can let the water sit and the chlorine will dissipate(I would take a big container and fill it with more water as i recommend letting the water sit for 2 days just in case). However, if you have chloramine I would use your old water conditioner. Do daily partial water changes, around 50 percent, and make sure the water you are putting in is the same temp as the water in the container or bowl. I hope this helps, if you can't get a heater for now that's fine, the clean water is very important however.
 

YellowGuppy

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I would recommend going slowly for the entire process. Make scooping the fish as slow and stress-free as possible. Acclimation to the new tank should happen over a matter of hours, not seconds - scoop just a little bit of fresh (or aged - see above comments) water into the container that your fish will be in, and let it adjust. Work slowly and cautiously. Dumping a sick fish into a completely different environment could send it into shock and end it. It needs clean water, but a sudden change can do more harm, even if it's a change to something good.
 

UnknownUser

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YellowGuppy said:
I would recommend going slowly for the entire process. Make scooping the fish as slow and stress-free as possible. Acclimation to the new tank should happen over a matter of hours, not seconds - scoop just a little bit of fresh (or aged - see above comments) water into the container that your fish will be in, and let it adjust. Work slowly and cautiously. Dumping a sick fish into a completely different environment could send it into shock and end it. It needs clean water, but a sudden change can do more harm, even if it's a change to something good.
I didn’t see anyone else mention this so I’d like to point out this reply because it’s so important in my opinion. A sick fish is already stressed. As mentioned above, leave the water for 24-48 hours and then use it to veryyyyyy slowlyyyyy change the water in the dirty bowl into clean water from the tank. I’m talking hours, maybe all day. I also agree clean water is more important than temp for now :)
 

flyinGourami

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LivebearerMom said:
I didn’t see anyone else mention this so I’d like to point out this reply because it’s so important in my opinion. A sick fish is already stressed. As mentioned above, leave the water for 24-48 hours and then use it to veryyyyyy slowlyyyyy change the water in the dirty bowl into clean water from the tank. I’m talking hours, maybe all day. I also agree clean water is more important than temp for now :)
Yeah, stress is a big factor of it. Don't move the fish around or change your mind when you see a bigger container. Just stick with one container. Big changes will only make everyhting worse.
 

DuaneV

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DuaneV You're very discouraging, don't you want to entice people into proper fish keeping instead of scaring them off with such harsh words?
[/QUOTE]

Harsh words? lol

Everyone has an opinion. Ive been keeping fish a long time and my opinions are just based on my observations. Another opinion of mine is, if you can't afford a heater for your Betta, dont get one.
 

UnknownUser

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DuaneV said:
DuaneV You're very discouraging, don't you want to entice people into proper fish keeping instead of scaring them off with such harsh words?
Harsh words? lol

Everyone has an opinion. Ive been keeping fish a long time and my opinions are just based on my observations. Another opinion of mine is, if you can't afford a heater for your Betta, dont get one.
[/QUOTE]

It’s not like OP went out and got a betta. He’s trying to help one that he already has. And he never said he can’t afford it. We can’t go out shopping due to our current pandemic. Sheesh.
 

Islandvic

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Order a cheap adjustable 50w heater, a thermometer and some dechlorinator online. Or source it locally.

Use a 5 gallon bucket as a temporary tank.

Keep the fish in the quarantine bucket until it gets better, then transfer it to it's final tank.
 

MasterPython

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Check the website of your water supplier and see if they use chlorine or chloramine.if it is chlorine that will evaporate in a bucket overnight. If it is chloramine I believe you need water conditioner.
 

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