Nix Water Changes?

2211Nighthawk
  • #1
ok, stupid question of the day. I have a 15 gallon moderately working on heavily planted that I want to have shrimp in, but there is to much of a ph jump that it kills them. 8.4 tankwater, 7.2 tap water.

So, because I like to over think things, there’s is products to replace the minerals for RO water. Could in theory I just top up the tank, and then dose those minerals separately instead of a full water change? (Ignoring cleaning, letting water sit out, ect ect, I just want to know if this is possible)
 
Dave125g
  • #2
I have a high tech planted 10 gallon lightly stocked with shrimp and snails. I only change 3 gallons every 2 weeks. You can top off with RO water but keep an eye on your parameters. I suggest you take a sample of tap water and leave it sit for a couple of days and test the ph. Just to make sure it's not something in your tank making the ph jump so high. If the tap water ph comes up after a few days I would just let enough tap water for a water change sit so your not shocking your shrimp.
 
Rojer Ramjet
  • #3
You need a ph buffer for shrimp; best thing is to start with an acidifying soil like Fluval Stratum and RODI water; add a shrimp buffer and you're done; easy peasy, lemon squeezy.

Your current plan is setting you up for failure - I know.
 
2211Nighthawk
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
I have a high tech planted 10 gallon lightly stocked with shrimp and snails. I only change 3 gallons every 2 weeks. You can top off with RO water but keep an eye on your parameters. I suggest you take a sample of tap water and leave it sit for a couple of days and test the ph. Just to make sure it's not something in your tank making the ph jump so high. If the tap water ph comes up after a few days I would just let enough tap water for a water change sit so your not shocking your shrimp.
I’ve tested both, tank sits at 8.2-.4 and tap is around 7.2. Even changing 4 gallon is enough of a change to kill my tester ghost shrimp. I thought about letting water set out but it is SUCH a pain to fill the tank then.
 
Dave125g
  • #5
It will cost far less to let the tap sit then to install an RO system.
 
2211Nighthawk
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
It will cost far less to let the tap sit then to install an RO system.
I don’t want to. But the point of water changes is to remove nitrates and to replace minerals (right?) so if my plants are taking care of the nitrates, coulden’t I just add the minerals manually? That’s more of what I’m wondering. Like I said, totally over complicating things but I’m curious.
 
david1978
  • #7
plants and fish only use some of the trace minerals. With addinv trace minerals you would need to know exactly what needs to be added and what doesn't. The all in one additive would add everything so some would build up.
 
2211Nighthawk
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
plants and fish only use some of the trace minerals. With addinv trace minerals you would need to know exactly what needs to be added and what doesn't. The all in one additive would add everything so some would build up.
Ok. That’s what I was kinda wondering. I have a boring job so I have LOTS of time to overthink things.
 
Dave125g
  • #9
I don’t want to. But the point of water changes is to remove nitrates and to replace minerals (right?) so if my plants are taking care of the nitrates, coulden’t I just add the minerals manually? That’s more of what I’m wondering. Like I said, totally over complicating things but I’m curious.
If your heavily planted and lightly stocked you should be fine. That's pretty much how a walstad set up works.
 
2211Nighthawk
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
If your heavily planted and lightly stocked you should be fine. That's pretty much how a walstad set up works.
But you still have to do the water changes to replace the miners. But that’s the plan. Betta, shrimp and lots of green stuff.
 
Dave125g
  • #11
Just keep an eye on your parameters and see how it goes for a few weeks.
 
2211Nighthawk
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
Okie dokie.
 
david1978
  • #13
I can tell you what happens to my tank. It's got a lot duck weed so I barely get any nitrates. I do 25% monthly water changes if I stretch it much farther my total dissolved solids start to rise and dissolved oxygen starts going down. Ph stays steady. Not sure on the safe levels of dissolved solids or dissolved oxygen but don't want too much variation from tap since that would cause other issues when I would do a water change.
 
2211Nighthawk
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
I can tell you what happens to my tank. It's got a lot duck weed so I barely get any nitrates. I do 25% monthly water changes if I stretch it much farther my total dissolved solids start to rise and dissolved oxygen starts going down. Ph stays steady. Not sure on the safe levels of dissolved solids or dissolved oxygen but don't want too much variation from tap since that would cause other issues when I would do a water change.
Yeah, I’m pretty slack with water changes because of the PH swing new water causes. (And it’s a betta in a 15. He ain’t making that big of a mess) I have a small air stone just so that I don’t get biofilm.
 
tjander
  • #15
What type of shrimp? I have found the easiest way to do WC and keep your PH at a stable level is acclimated your fish or shrimp to the tap water PH. Adding PH buffers is tough and I always seem to be chasing it up or down.
Now, I understand some shrimp require s high PH or is it low, I can’t remember. anyway Cherry shrimp or that family will easily adapt to a 7.x PH in no time.
I started to match my ph by slowly adjusting he tank to meet my tap, then started to use just tap water.
Good idea to add equilibrium or other mineral supplements.
 

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