Nitrite Vs Nitrate

SSJ

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Though i have read the nitrogen cycle a hundred times, I still am not clear on the nitrite vs nitrate part..let me put it this way...it you find your nitrites to be high..and ammonia normal, what do you do to reduce the nitrites? I believe nitrates arent that harmful so we dont need to worry about them?
 

Jenoli42

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SSJ said:
Though i have read the nitrogen cycle a hundred times, I still am not clear on the nitrite vs nitrate part..let me put it this way...it you find your nitrites to be high..and ammonia normal, what do you do to reduce the nitrites? I believe nitrates arent that harmful so we dont need to worry about them?
Here is the most simple way to explain the cycle i know:

put simply, your fish poo. that poo breaks down into ammonia which is toxic to fish. imagine breathing your own poo.

one type of bacteria eat the ammonia. those bacteria then poo and create nitrite. nitrite is also very toxic to fish.

a second type of bacteria (nitrobacter) start growing. these guys grow more slowly but they eat nitrite. when nitrobacter poo, they produce nitrate.

nitrate is less toxic & perfectly safe for fish until it gets higher than 20-40 ppm. you remove nitrates when you do weekly water changes. most of us keep nitrates below 20ppm.

I hope that makes sense?

getting seachem prime will keep your fish safe as long as the levels of ammonia plus nitrite combined add up to less than 1ppm. (edit: example. ammonia at .5 + nitrite .25 = .75 total toxins = safe with prime)

when your levels are higher, you need to do partial water changes (usually daily) to remove the toxins back down to a safer level. you do this until your bacteria grow and can do it themselves.

so for your nitrite problem, it depends what exact test result you mean by "high". if nitrite is higher than 1ppm, you need to do partial water changes to get it below 1ppm and then dose with prime.

Yes, you need to worry about nitrates because once they're above 40ppm they can harm fish. weekly water changes is how you manage nitrates.
 
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SSJ

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Jenoli42 said:
Here is the most simple way to explain the cycle i know:

put simply, your fish poo. that poo breaks down into ammonia which is toxic to fish. imagine breathing your own poo.

one type of bacteria eat the ammonia. those bacteria then poo and create nitrite. nitrite is also very toxic to fish.

a second type of bacteria (nitrobacter) start growing. these guys grow more slowly but they eat nitrite. when nitrobacter poo, they produce nitrate.

nitrate is less toxic & perfectly safe for fish until it gets higher than 20-40 ppm. you remove nitrates when you do weekly water changes. most of us keep nitrates below 20ppm.

I hope that makes sense?

getting seachem prime will keep your fish safe as long as the levels of ammonia plus nitrite combined add up to less than 1ppm. (edit: example. ammonia at .5 + nitrite .25 = .75 total toxins = safe with prime)

when your levels are higher, you need to do partial water changes (usually daily) to remove the toxins back down to a safer level. you do this until your bacteria grow and can do it themselves.

so for your nitrite problem, it depends what exact test result you mean by "high". if nitrite is higher than 1ppm, you need to do partial water changes to get it below 1ppm and then dose with prime.

Yes, you need to worry about nitrates because once they're above 40ppm they can harm fish. weekly water changes is how you manage nitrates.
Wow, thanks for the amazing writeup!!
 

Jenoli42

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SSJ said:
Wow, thanks for the amazing writeup!!
no worries! I learned everything I know through amazing people on this forum, (& a bit of my own research...meaning Google but mostly my own horrible mistakes )

edit: you don't need to do water changes for nitrites if you're doing a fish less cycle unless they get stuck around 5ppm
 
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SSJ

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Jenoli42 said:
no worries! I learned everything I know through amazing people on this forum, (& a bit of my own research...meaning Google but mostly my own horrible mistakes )

edit: you don't need to do water changes for nitrites if you're doing a fish less cycle unless they get stuck around 5ppm
My nitrite kit will arrive soon. I will have better insight then
 

Trevor Gillingham

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Jenoli42 said:
Here is the most simple way to explain the cycle i know:

put simply, your fish poo. that poo breaks down into ammonia which is toxic to fish. imagine breathing your own poo.

one type of bacteria eat the ammonia. those bacteria then poo and create nitrite. nitrite is also very toxic to fish.

a second type of bacteria (nitrobacter) start growing. these guys grow more slowly but they eat nitrite. when nitrobacter poo, they produce nitrate.

nitrate is less toxic & perfectly safe for fish until it gets higher than 20-40 ppm. you remove nitrates when you do weekly water changes. most of us keep nitrates below 20ppm.

I hope that makes sense?

getting seachem prime will keep your fish safe as long as the levels of ammonia plus nitrite combined add up to less than 1ppm. (edit: example. ammonia at .5 + nitrite .25 = .75 total toxins = safe with prime)

when your levels are higher, you need to do partial water changes (usually daily) to remove the toxins back down to a safer level. you do this until your bacteria grow and can do it themselves.

so for your nitrite problem, it depends what exact test result you mean by "high". if nitrite is higher than 1ppm, you need to do partial water changes to get it below 1ppm and then dose with prime.

Yes, you need to worry about nitrates because once they're above 40ppm they can harm fish. weekly water changes is how you manage nitrates.
I am fully aware of the nitrogen cycle. That said; this is the best, most simply put explanation of it I have ever read. Every beginner should read this. Well done
 

Aqua Hands

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Jenoli42 said:
Here is the most simple way to explain the cycle i know:

put simply, your fish poo. that poo breaks down into ammonia which is toxic to fish. imagine breathing your own poo.

one type of bacteria eat the ammonia. those bacteria then poo and create nitrite. nitrite is also very toxic to fish.

a second type of bacteria (nitrobacter) start growing. these guys grow more slowly but they eat nitrite. when nitrobacter poo, they produce nitrate.

nitrate is less toxic & perfectly safe for fish until it gets higher than 20-40 ppm. you remove nitrates when you do weekly water changes. most of us keep nitrates below 20ppm.

I hope that makes sense?

getting seachem prime will keep your fish safe as long as the levels of ammonia plus nitrite combined add up to less than 1ppm. (edit: example. ammonia at .5 + nitrite .25 = .75 total toxins = safe with prime)

when your levels are higher, you need to do partial water changes (usually daily) to remove the toxins back down to a safer level. you do this until your bacteria grow and can do it themselves.

so for your nitrite problem, it depends what exact test result you mean by "high". if nitrite is higher than 1ppm, you need to do partial water changes to get it below 1ppm and then dose with prime.

Yes, you need to worry about nitrates because once they're above 40ppm they can harm fish. weekly water changes is how you manage nitrates.
WOW, I knew about the N. cycle and thats such a better way to explain it then I've ever heard
 

fissh

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SSJ said:
Though i have read the nitrogen cycle a hundred times, I still am not clear on the nitrite vs nitrate part..let me put it this way...it you find your nitrites to be high..and ammonia normal, what do you do to reduce the nitrites? I believe nitrates arent that harmful so we dont need to worry about them?
very well done, when I owned a LFS I would have hired you.
 

Lauradesu

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Ammonia turns into nitrite turns into nitrate. The cycle confused me at first too, I'm cheering you on!
 

Jenoli42

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Trevor Gillingham said:
I am fully aware of the nitrogen cycle. That said; this is the best, most simply put explanation of it I have ever read. Every beginner should read this. Well done
ngawwww... shucks. thank you
 
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