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Jawz

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Hi guys, i am new here on the forums. I just wanted to know, i started a new tank about a month and a half ago, everything was going good. We had another tank for my little sister with goldfish, nothing big just 3 goldfish. We added the goldfish into our 46 gallon tank(freshwater). Recently some of our fish have been dying, like our angel fish. We think it is due to the fact that the goldfish are chasing them. Right now this is our aquarium.2 yellow gouramis1 blue gourami1 cobra guppy(male)2guppys 1 male 1female 2 red eyed tetras 2 red mollys 3 goldfish 1red cap oranda. Can you please list some compatible fish with ours.
 

Kunsthure

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Welcome to Fish Lore! I'm sorry to hear about your fish.

Was the tank fully cycled? What are you ammonia, nitrIte and nitrAte readings? Those are really important to look at after fish die. I have a sneaking suspicion that the goldfish overwhelmed the biological filter because they are huge mess-makers. The guideline is 20g for the first goldfish and 10g for each additional goldfish, so your tank is the perfect size for your sister's three goldfish and nothing else. IMO, even without the three goldfish, the tank is overstocked. Can you rehome some of them?

We can better help if we know your water parameters. Do you have a way to test your water?

-Lisa
 

Prince Powder

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Hello and welcome to Fishlore!

Sorry about your recent losses.
I'm sorry to tell you that the fish you have listed are not really compatible with each other. The gouramis, guppys, tetras and mollies are all tropical fish where the goldfish are temperate fish. They have different temperature requirements. Tropicals need warm water, usually around 76-80 degrees. Goldfish need cooler water than that and don't do well for too long in warmer waters. Goldfish also have very large tank requirements because they get to be quite big (anywhere from one to two feet long or more) and produce a great deal of waste. It is generally recommended that fancy type goldfish like your oranda are given a minimum of 20 gallons for the first goldfish and an extra 10 gallons for each additional goldfish. Single tail fish like the regular little feeder fish need even more space than that because of their strong swimming habits. Feeder type goldfish really do better in ponds where they have the space to stretch their fins. It would be wise to consider either returning or rehoming the goldfish. With the goldfish in the tank I would not recommend adding anything.

I see in your aquarium info that you are aware of the nitrogen cycle. One possible reason for your fish loss could be an ammonia or nitrite spike caused by the addition of the goldfish. You may be in a mini cycle, however we would need to know the most current test results for your ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels to be certain. As I mentioned goldfish are very high waste producers which can put a large strain on your biological filtration so it's possible that adding 3 at once threw your parameters out of whack. This would be even more possible since it is a relatively new tank which could have been still cycling or just cycled and therefore not strong enough to handle the new additions. If you could post your test results for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate it will help to determine whether or not a mini cycle is responsible for your recent fish loss and proceed from there.
 
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Jawz

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Thank you for you guidance everyone, I will try to get the tests in fast.
 
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Jawz

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Hey guy I'm back with the tests. Sorry i Did not read your post earlier about the master kit, i went out and bought the strips. So I tested it once and it read:
General hardness 180
Carbonate hardness 180
pH 7
NO2 0
NO3 40
So it looks like the only thing we need to fix is both the general and the carbonate hardness. Will those levels go down if i remove the gold fish? Also is it okay if i remove just the 3 goldfish and not the red cap oranda?
Please reply, thank you for your help and time.
 

Kunsthure

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The hardness is a quality of your water and is unrelated to the fish. Your NO3 is still too high, 20 is the upper limit. It's hard to know what's going on without knowing the ammonia, though.

Removing the three goldfish is a step in the right direction but your tank is still overstocked without them. Plus, goldfish aren't tropical fish and like cooler waters than everyone else in the tank. If it were me, I'd move all four goldfish to their own tank, keeping in mind that you'd need another another tank the same size as your current tank. The other option is to rehome them, either back to the LFS or a friend.

Hopefully someone else will come along and offer another alternative that I'm just not seeing.

-Lisa
 

Prince Powder

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Personally, I'm always a bit skeptical about test strip results as they are more often than not inaccurate. However, being as how that is what you have, for the moment we will assume they are correct and go from there.

To be honest, gh and kh I've never tested for so I'll leave those results for someone with more knowledge in that area. PH at 7 is considered neutral and is a fine range for all your fish. PH is one of those areas where fish can adapt outside their range anyways so either way you are good there. This is of course not to say that pH is completely unimportant, simply that you generally have a bit more leeway there. Your nitrate levels are pretty high, many of us strive to keep that level at 20 or below to allow room for error. Anything above 40ppm is pushing toxic levels so I'd recommend a 50% water change two days in a row in order to drop that number a bit and give you some space with the readings. Nitrite at zero is precisely where you want it to be so depending on the accuracy of the test, that should not be the issue. Unfortunately your test does not include ammonia. Ammonia is extremely toxic at any level more than zero and it is the first parameter to be affected in the event of a mini cycle. Without that reading it is still pretty hard to say whether or not water quality is your problem. If you are able to get an ammonia test (I would highly recommend a liquid test) and check your ammonia levels then we can see if ammonia might be the problem. Either way, a few large water changes if for nothing else but to lower your nitrate would also help lower your ammonia levels if you have any.

Regardless of whether or not water parameters are an issue, rehoming the goldfish would be a very good start to balancing out your tank. As for what size tank you would need to comfortably house your goldfish, it would depend on the types of goldfish you have. Single tails tend to have larger tank requirements than fancy type goldfish. This is because they get to be very long and are strong swimmers who really need the extra space to move about. For 4 fancy type goldfish, you'd be looking at around a 50 gallon tank minimum. However bigger is always better, especially for high waste producers like goldies.

As for the rest of your stock, one thing you will want to watch out for will be possible aggression issues between your gouramis. Gouramis tend to be pretty intolerant of other gouramis and as they mature they will each demand larger and larger territories which they will defend against each other. Make sure you have lots and lots of plants (real or fake) to break up the territories and provide plenty of hiding spots. It would be wise to rehome at least one of the gouramis. As for the tetras, the only thing with them is that they are schooling fish. They prefer to be kept in schools of at least five, the more the merrier. If you are able to rehome the goldies and at least one gourami then I would suggest getting a few more of the tetras to give them a proper school. However, if you can not rehome the others I would not suggest adding anything to the tank as it is currently overstocked.

I'm sure this isn't exactly what you wanted to hear, but a tank is much more healthy and enjoyable when the fish are happy and compatible. When you allow the fish's needs to dictate your decisions on stocking a tank, the fish stay happy and stress free which keeps them healthy and you stress free.
 

Aquarist

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Hello Jaws and Welcome to Fish Lore.

Lots of good info above. I hope you enjoy the site.

Sorry to hear about your losses.

Ken
 
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