new tank 10 Gallon Tank 

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chef_cory

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A friend called me and asked if i wanted another tank. Of course i am gonna take it. I think it is a 10 but i am not sure. Now i have the chance to do a proper cycle i was given alot of wrong info when i started my first tank. Either way on decorations whats the rule with rocks from outside. What do i have to do to use them safely? Gravel i will buy and not sure if i will try out a planted or stay with fake plants. More readiing required if i go planted
 
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ryanr

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Hi, welcome to fishlore chef_cory, hope you enjoy the site.

You can check out the info in the Nitrogen cycle page at: https://www.fishlore.com/NitrogenCycle.htm, it'll give you some great info on fishless cycling, as well as a heap of info in the Nitrogen Cycle forums.

Regarding rocks from outside, generally they are fine if they are river rocks. The best way to test is to drop some white vinegar on the rock, if it fizzes then it's no good for your Freshwater tank (generally)

Then, if it's ok to use, I would recommend a strong scrub in some hot water, or a bath of vinegar/water, or bleech and water (I think it's about 1:19 ratio). Then rinse thoroughly, and for extra measure, I would boil the rocks for a while. (Just don't use any soaps/detergents)

Fake or real plants = personal taste. I personally love the all natural look, but plastic plants can make a huge impact with the right colours and arrangement.

You can get some great easy maintanence plants, and if you decide to go down that path, we can guide you. If you are going to go real plants, I would recommend a gravel that is about 3mm in "grain" size, or better yet, a proper substrate such as Eco Complete or Seachem Flourite.

These forums are full of experienced hobbyists that are more than happy to offer advice.

Hope you enjoy the site and your new tank
 
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chef_cory

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Thanks buddy. With this tank i am going to play with the water and learn the cycle before i get any fish. I do have a tank running but set it up with bad info and i am getting a water test kit tomorrow.
 

lanlesnee

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I have a 125 planted tank, a planted gold fish tank and all my Betta tank's are planted. It's not all that hard to keep vs a regular tank.
IMO the most important thing is lighting. Make sure you have enough. If I remember right, someone correct me if I'm wrong. But you want at least 2-3 watts per gallon and 5 watts or more for plants with high light needs. I think in this case more it better.
 

peacemaker92

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Just dropping by to Welcome you to Fishlore!
 

FishLuver

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If you have a tank going now, you could use half of the water from that one to jump start it and even use the media from it. If your existing tank tests okay of course.
 

NMfishman

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Welcome to Fishlore
I agree with Ryanr with the stones.
Go Canucks!!!
 
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ryanr

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FishLuver said:
If you have a tank going now, you could use half of the water from that one to jump start it and even use the media from it. If your existing tank tests okay of course.
I agree with using the media from the existing tank. I have to disagree about using the water from the other tank though. There is very little beneficial bacteria in the water column itself. BB attaches to just about any surface in the tank.

Transferring media is one the best way, but using gravel, decorations can also work. If you're going to transfer media, just make sure you leave plenty in the existing tank, otherwise you could encounter a mini-cycle.
 

ppate1977

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+1 ryanr on using media rather than water, using the old water will do no good. Use a few cups of gravel or put an extra filter sponge in to get a BB colony going.
 

FishLuver

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But using the old water would be better than using tap water wouldn't it?
 

jeniferdwn

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ryanr said:
Regarding rocks from outside, generally they are fine if they are river rocks. The best way to test is to drop some white vinegar on the rock, if it fizzes then it's no good for your Freshwater tank (generally)

Then, if it's ok to use, I would recommend a strong scrub in some hot water, or a bath of vinegar/water, or bleech and water (I think it's about 1:19 ratio). Then rinse thoroughly, and for extra measure, I would boil the rocks for a while. (Just don't use any soaps/detergents)
Would it be hijacking to ask about why you suggest not using regular rocks? And why you need to boil them?
 
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chef_cory

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first of all i am going to take the long road cycling the tank cause i never have done a proper cycle. I wanted to know about rocks and gravel because they are much cheaper than the pet store sells any decorations.
 
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ryanr

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jeniferdwn said:
Would it be hijacking to ask about why you suggest not using regular rocks? And why you need to boil them?
It's not hijacking, it's still on topic.

Rocks
I'm not suggesting that you don't use regular rocks, but you need to test their suitability for a fresh water aquarium first. Some rocks contain limestone, others come from volcanos, others are regular old river rocks.

If the rock contains limestone, it will leech into the aquarium, causing a rise in pH and carbonate hardness (KH). This can be a good thing if you are deliberately trying to raise the pH, i.e. if you have low pH tap water, or you are wanting to keep a species that prefer pH up around the 8.0 mark.

Generally, most freshwater tropicals prefer pH around the 6.8-7.4 mark, thus as a general rule, we don't need (or want) to add anything that will change water parameters.

Boiling
On the topic of boiling rocks. Boiling just about anything is a great way to sterilise the rocks and kill any bacteria that might be on the rock when we get it (particularly if you've found along a creek/river).

chef_cory, I hope that further explains what I was talking about in my previous post. Can't wait to see pic's of your new tank, and I hope you enjoy the cycling process, it's an educating experience, and congrats on fishless cycling.
 

Elodea

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Great response as usual, Ryan.

I would like to add that boiling rocks that were picked up from the ground also destroys most, if not all, of the harmful chemicals that it may have been exposed to (Who knows how long that rock's been around for? Maybe it got doused with crude oil in World War 1!)
 

mizzoufan96

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For rocks from rivers I ussualy boil them then scrub them. That should be good.
 
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ryanr

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FishLuver said:
But using the old water would be better than using tap water wouldn't it?
Yes and no. Assuming everything is spot on in the other tank, parameters are right etc, then yes, it's better than tap water.

At the same point, it's also 'old water', and could potentially contain hidden nasties.

I prefer to use conditioned tap water by using a conditioner that removes both chlorine and chloramine.
 
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chef_cory

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ryan thanks you have been very help full. i now have a slim chance of trading the unstarted 10 gallon for a 40 gallon with a co-worker that had got this tank from a friend for his daughter her mom said no and he has no room for a tank that size.
 

FishLuver

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sweet deal!
 
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chef_cory

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got my 10 gallon tank today gonna clean it and lay out the gravel tonight
 

FriendsNotFood

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Grats!!! You know what, you should post pics ;P

One thing a lot of people have mentioned is testing with vinegar. If it doesn't fizz with vinegar on it, chances are with proper cleaning it will be fine for the tank.

I recently bought a giant shell and a slate rock for my tank. Soaked both in warm water with vinegar for 30mins (not boiling, but just a little too hot to stick your hand in). Boiled the rock for 20mins, then I let it cool and rinsed it in old tank water before putting it in.

With the shell, I poured water that wasn't quite boiling (eg boil the kettle, leave it 5mins, then pour) over the shell, scrubbed it with toothpaste (toothpaste is good for shells, ok?!), then stuck it back in warm water and vinegar for an hour. My shell also had a small nook which I was worried about my fish getting stuck in, or water/gunk festering in so I drilled an extra hole to allow flowthrough.

Could also be an issue with a rock if you get one, there are quite a few honeycomb rocks out there.

And if you get ornaments from places other than pet stores, the boiling and vinegar rules are good, but be careful because some things can't handle high temps (eg my shell) and should just be disinfected with things like salt, vinegar, or near boiling water.

Edit: Also if you're cleaning the tank try not to use a harsh chemical. Warm water is your best bet. If you are going to use harsh chemicals, (bleach, detergent) might be best to run it with just activated carbon to remove any residual chemicals before trying to start a cycle. I know I can never get bleach off my skin when I use it, so I'd use the same theory with a tank.
 
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