New tank stocking advice 60g

heatherbeehappy

I’m new to aquariums and wanted to get some advice on stocking my 60 gallon tank given my water parameters. I’m currently waiting for the tank to cycle, so no fish added yet. My pH runs 7.4, GH 7, KH 6. I have an adjustable heater, fluval hob filter, and bubble bar with adjustable intensity. My substrate is smooth gravel (like small river rock). I just started some live plants. I plan to add one type of fish at a time- smallest to largest. Here’s what I had in mind:
1 angelfish
4 Bolivian rams
Undecided school (tetras vs rasboras vs cherry barbs)
5 kuhli loach
8 otocinclus
Please give me advice. Is this too much? Do I have enough cleaner fish to help keep algae down? I’m open to suggestions on the school. Currently leaning toward harlequin rasboras or cardinal tetras. Thanks in advance!
 

Motherlovebetta

I dont know anything about angelfish or Bolivian Rams, but I really like my harlequin rasboras they are very peaceful and school nicely. I would get more kuhli loaches or they will just hide. I don’t have any otos, but from what I have read I think they need a pretty established tank with lots of plants or they will starve? Maybe get them last or you could do a big school of Cory catfish (probably more hardy)they are fun to watch and would be fine with kuhlis too.
 

heatherbeehappy

Thank you! Yes, I read that about the oto’s too, now that you reminded me. Will definitely put them and the loaches in last and consider upping the number of loaches.
I dont know anything about angelfish or Bolivian Rams, but I really like my harlequin rasboras they are very peaceful and school nicely. I would get more kuhli loaches or they will just hide. I don’t have any otos, but from what I have read I think they need a pretty established tank with lots of plants or they will starve? Maybe get them last or you could do a big school of Cory catfish (probably more hardy)they are fun to watch and would be fine with kuhlis too.
Also, do you think my pH is too high for harlequin rasboras? Some things I’ve read say they need lower pH, like 6-6.5. That wouldn’t be doable for me without a lot of manipulation and I don’t want to dicker with it much.
 

ProudPapa

I haven't kept rasboras, but I think they'd be okay. However, if you're concerned about the pH you might consider a school of some type of tetra instead. Most of them will be fine with that water. I have several species thriving in my 8.2 pH water.

Black neon tetras and serpae tetras are my favorites, followed by lemon tetras and pristella tetras.
 

Motherlovebetta

Thank you! Yes, I read that about the oto’s too, now that you reminded me. Will definitely put them and the loaches in last and consider upping the number of loaches.

Also, do you think my pH is too high for harlequin rasboras? Some things I’ve read say they need lower pH, like 6-6.5. That wouldn’t be doable for me without a lot of manipulation and I don’t want to dicker with it much.
I have well water and the ph in all of my tanks is 7.6-8.0
 

JLAquatics

First of all, welcome to Fishlore! Now onto my real response to your previous question;

Most hardy commercially bred species of Rasbora or Tetra should do great in your water at a ph of 7.4. I own Neon Tetras, Ember Tetras, and Lambchop Rasboras (close cousin of Harlequins) in water with a ph of 8, kh of 13, and a gh buffered to 6 and my fish are in very healthy shape. In fact, my Rasboras routinely lay eggs despite my very hard water which is a great sign.

When you get your schooling fish, try to find a species that grows larger than 1.5 inches as adults, preferably 2 inches plus. The reason for this is that you will have an Angelfish and this fish will eat any fish small enough to fit in its mouth. While members have made Angelfish work with smaller fish, I would not recommend it if you are just starting out with owning aquariums. I personally recommend the Harlequin Rasbora option to try out. These fish are peaceful to other tankmates, look amazing in larger groups, and will provide a ton of activity in your community.

For algae, having algae eaters in your tank will not cure algae issues you may encounter, just help out a little here and there. The real goal with setting your tank up is that you have the tank balanced where you will not need to rely on algae eaters in the first place. Do weekly water changes and gravel vaccum regularly to reduce excess organics, which is a food source for algae. If you are not using live plants in your setup, having the light on only when viewing the tank will help greatly with this. If you are using live plants (which your water is perfect for), make sure they are in healthy shape by providing nutrients for them in the form of column fertilization or root tabs as well as just enough light (about 8 hours of daytime light in an established tank). However, if just starting out with live plants I would personally recommend Anubias which many call the rubber plant due to its texture and ease of care. It will grow very slowly but requires not a whole lot of nutrients to stay in healthy shape.

Welcome again. I hope you find everything you are looking for here. :)
-JLAquatics
 

heatherbeehappy

I haven't kept rasboras, but I think they'd be okay. However, if you're concerned about the pH you might consider a school of some type of tetra instead. Most of them will be fine with that water. I have several species thriving in my 8.2 pH water.

Black neon tetras and serpae tetras are my favorites, followed by lemon tetras and pristella tetras.
Thanks! I was just at the pet store and saw some serpaes there and liked them a lot!
 

heatherbeehappy

First of all, welcome to Fishlore! Now onto my real response to your previous question;

Most hardy commercially bred species of Rasbora or Tetra should do great in your water at a ph of 7.4. I own Neon Tetras, Ember Tetras, and Lambchop Rasboras (close cousin of Harlequins) in water with a ph of 8, kh of 13, and a gh buffered to 6 and my fish are in very healthy shape. In fact, my Rasboras routinely lay eggs despite my very hard water which is a great sign.

When you get your schooling fish, try to find a species that grows larger than 1.5 inches as adults, preferably 2 inches plus. The reason for this is that you will have an Angelfish and this fish will eat any fish small enough to fit in its mouth. While members have made Angelfish work with smaller fish, I would not recommend it if you are just starting out with owning aquariums. I personally recommend the Harlequin Rasbora option to try out. These fish are peaceful to other tankmates, look amazing in larger groups, and will provide a ton of activity in your community.

For algae, having algae eaters in your tank will not cure algae issues you may encounter, just help out a little here and there. The real goal with setting your tank up is that you have the tank balanced where you will not need to rely on algae eaters in the first place. Do weekly water changes and gravel vaccum regularly to reduce excess organics, which is a food source for algae. If you are not using live plants in your setup, having the light on only when viewing the tank will help greatly with this. If you are using live plants (which your water is perfect for), make sure they are in healthy shape by providing nutrients for them in the form of column fertilization or root tabs as well as just enough light (about 8 hours of daytime light in an established tank). However, if just starting out with live plants I would personally recommend Anubias which many call the rubber plant due to its texture and ease of care. It will grow very slowly but requires not a whole lot of nutrients to stay in healthy shape.

Welcome again. I hope you find everything you are looking for here. :)
-JLAquatics
Thank you! I did just plant a few things yesterday, including an anubias. Fingers crossed! My live plants are very small so far, but hoping at least a couple will take off. I went to look around at our local pet store today and they did have some rasboras and tetras that I liked that will be of appropriate size. My hubby is the one who really wanted an angelfish but I think I’m wearing him down on that a little. I feel like it limits us with its semi-aggressiveness and tempting long fins. I’m really in love with the Bolivian rams and would rather have more of those instead of an angel.
 

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