New Tank Cycling Parameter

GreenPhantom

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I am cycling a 10 gallon tank the ammonia came from the dirt. The dirt doesn’t have any fertilizers. The ammonia is 0.5 ppm and nitrite is 1 ppm and nitrate is 5 ppm. The ph is 7.4. Is it almost done and do I need to do a water change.
 

WindChill

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It is considered “Done” when the ammonia and nitrite are at 0ppm. Keep watch and be patient. Do not change water unless you have fish in the tank already.
 

GreenPhantom

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I don’t have fish yet. Also I don’t have the heater yet will that affect it
 

Momgoose56

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I am cycling a 10 gallon tank the ammonia came from the dirt. The dirt doesn’t have any fertilizers. The ammonia is 0.5 ppm and nitrite is 1 ppm and nitrate is 5 ppm. The ph is 7.4. Is it almost done and do I need to do a water change.
Welcome to Fishlore Green Phantom! You need to feed the tank more ammonia for it to cycle enough (grow enough nitrifying bacteria) to control the waste fish are going to produce. Apparently, the dirt you put in there had enough organic material that decomposed to get your cycle started, but it won't be enough to finish it up. The best, fastest, controlled way to do a fishless cycle is to use a pure ammonia source. Pure Ammonium cloride-ACE Hardware carry's their own brand and you can Google other sources without perfumes, detergents or surfactants-can be easily regulated with this ammonia calculator:
http://spec-tanks.com/ammonia-calculator-aquariums/
I see on your profile that you know about the Nitrogen cycle. You'll need to dose your tank with ammonia until enough bacteria is established to reduce 2ppm of ammonia to 0ppm within 24 hours of dosing the tank, and keeps nitrites at 0ppm continuously.
If you want to use fish food as an ammonia source, it is harder to control and usually takes a bit longer to work (the fish food takes time to rot and produce ammonia and levels will fluctuate, depending on the ingredients in the fishfood).
Another thing you can do to speed things up while adding an ammonia source, is to add a bacterial culture to the tank. Tetra Safestart seems produce some good results. It introduces some additional bacteria to your tank and boosts the cycling process. You've got an early start on your cycle but you need to keep feeding those bacteria that are producing the nitrites you are reading on your tests. Fully cycling a tank without adding additional bacteria typically takes between 4 to 8 weeks. When did you set your tank up?

I don’t have fish yet. Also I don’t have the heater yet will that affect it
Heat will affect the speed of bacteria growth. The best temperature range for growing Nitrifying bacteria is between 76 and 86°F. So if you aren't maintaining a constant temperature within that range then it might be a good idea to get a heater in there.
 
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GreenPhantom

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I set up the tank a few weeks ago but I added a filter yesterday. The last tank I cycled was using fish food and it cycled in 3 weeks. I can add a heater soon and it will be 80 degrees Fahrenheit because it’s for a betta splendens. I also have something called stability can I use it?
 
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