New Plants No Roots - Newbie

  1. Robert Fletcher

    Robert Fletcher Member Member

    I am a newbie especially when it come to plants. The other day I bought from a dealer an anubious and Java fern. These came in little plastic pots with a ceramic weight to hold them down. I planted the Anubias on some bogwood and the Java Fern in the substrate. Now today I went to another specialist fish supplier for more plants. These however was held my a metallic ring. (Looks like zinc). When I come to plant them they did not have roots. The Jungle Vals had a whisky hint of roots and I was able to plant it. The Dwarf Lily, Bacopa & Ludwigia Repens just looked as if they had been harvested with a knife. I put them in the substrate as I bought them hoping they will grow roots. Have I done the right thing?
    Thanks.
     




  2. a

    abheeshs Member Member

    For Bacopa, they may sprout false roots, but they are mostly left floating.
     




  3. OP
    OP
    Robert Fletcher

    Robert Fletcher Member Member

    So your saying the Bacopa should float? What about the others. I have spent time mainly on YouTube to get plants that are easy to grow and require no special looking after. This is what I came up with.
     
  4. FishFish221

    FishFish221 Well Known Member Member

    You should also only bury the roots of the Java Fern. Burying the rhizome (the green part of the java fern that is attached under the leaves and roots) will result in it dying. Java ferns get everything they need through its leaves.

    [oops triple post]
     
  5. FishFish221

    FishFish221 Well Known Member Member

    You should also only bury the roots of the Java Fern. Burying the rhizome (the green part of the java fern that is attached under the leaves and roots) will result in it dying. Java ferns get everything they need through its leaves.
     
  6. B

    Betrayer Well Known Member Member

    Welcome to Fishlore!

    I agree about the Java fern. Rhizome plants tend to do best when attached to hardscape, either rock or driftwood works well. You can use crazy glue to attach or tie them on with thread. They will eventually attach onto the hardscape themselves, but it takes time.

    Stem plants are frequently sold without roots. They are most likely cuttings taken from the top of established plants. I have both bacopa caroliniana and ludwigia repens in my tank. I planted them in my sand substrate and they put out roots fairly quickly. I suppose you could float the bacopa, but it definitely works planted in the substrate as well. Here is a pic of mine:

    (Bacopa in the middle in front of the heater; Ludwigia to the left near the branches)
    image.jpeg
    I usually add root tabs near my stem plants, although they tend to also get nutrients from the water column. I follow a fairly easy fertilizer dosing routine and my plants are doing pretty well. I would describe their growth as slow and steady, which I don't mind. Best of luck with your tank!
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Robert Fletcher

    Robert Fletcher Member Member

    I have just checked the Java Fern and it seems more or less on the surface. In hindsight I am wondering if I should have got one plant at a time.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Robert Fletcher

    Robert Fletcher Member Member

    Thanks so much for the tips. I may not have Bacopa as one on my list I did not have. So putting them in with the metal weight to keep them down is OK then. I have included a picture. There is just 4 danios in there at the moment as it is cycling they seem to be camera shy..
     

    Attached Files:

  9. B

    Betrayer Well Known Member Member

    You're right--I don't see bacopa. Your tank looks lovely! I really like it! Your plants appear very vibrant and healthy.

    I would actually remove the metal weight that held the plants together. The stems should ideally be plants with a little bit of space between them. If you zoom in on the bacopa in my pic, you will see how I placed the stems about 1-2 inches apart. Each stem is an individual plant and you want some room for their root systems to grow.

    Sometimes it takes a few attempts to get the stems to stay in the substrate when they don't have roots. I use a pair of long, curved tweezers to position them nice and deep. Then, I gently push some extra sand all around them. It may be slightly different with gravel; I've only planted in sand.

    With the anubius and Java fern, just be really sure that the rhizome is not buried or it will begin to rot. Zoom in on my anubius congensis to get some ideas. It's slightly right of center. One of them is on my driftwood--I was able to tuck the rhizome and some roots into a split in the wood. The other one is tied to a small rock using green thread.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Robert Fletcher

    Robert Fletcher Member Member

    One again thanks for your help and suggestions. My Anubias is just fitted in a slip and hole in the driftwood. I did that the other day after I read not to bury the rhizomes. I will get some appropriate tweezers and things to put the plants in. Does not work too well with hands. I will also get some fertilizer as well. I am not worried about the Jungle Vals as back in the 70’s when I last had tropical fish that was the only plant that would grow. Those days we had an under the gravel filter that I believe are not good for plants as they pull in too much oxygen.
     
  11. vikingkirken

    vikingkirken Well Known Member Member

  12. -Mak-

    -Mak- Well Known Member Member

    Stem plants are propagated by cutting off the tops and replanting, so that's why they come without roots. Sticking them in the substrate is fine, they will eventually grow roots.