New Goldfish acting weird

Anastasia01

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I kept 2 goldfish for about 4 years until one died and I've kept the single one alone for a year so he's now 5 years old. I decided to add a new fish today and they seem to be fine, theres no biting or anything but they will not leave each others side they are chilling at the bottom together and when one moves so does the other they are also near the bottom and before my fish wouldnt just stay at the bottom like he is now. Is this normal?
 

AquaticQueen

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Maybe they are just enjoying each other's company? Goldfish are technically considered schooling fish even though they do perfectly fine by themselves. They are probably just schooling together.
I wouldn't worry about it :)
 
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Anastasia01

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AquaticQueen said:
Maybe they are just enjoying each other's company? Goldfish are technically considered schooling fish even though they do perfectly fine by themselves. They are probably just schooling together.
I wouldn't worry about it :)
Ok that's a relief thank you
 

Frisbee

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Are his fins clamped or anything? Does he have trouble breathing or inflamed gills? What type of goldfish do you have and what kind of tank setup?

It probably isn't anything to be concerned about, but better safe then sorry.
 
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Anastasia01

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Frisbee said:
Are his fins clamped or anything? Does he have trouble breathing or inflamed gills? What type of goldfish do you have and what kind of tank setup?

It probably isn't anything to be concerned about, but better safe then sorry.
No both their fins looks fine and they're breathing normally it seems. I think the new type is a comet but im not sure and I cant remember at all what the old one is. I've attached some photos, the old one is the bigger yellow one, also the tank is new i moved them in newly with the new fish. I ordered a bubbler to oxygenate it as I know the round type is not ideal for oxygen. However, today I noticed the new one is actually sort of chasing the old one around and the old one seems to dart away quiet a lot but the new one persists to follow it and sometimes he nibbles the old one.
 

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Frisbee

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Anastasia01 said:
No both their fins looks fine and they're breathing normally it seems. I think the new type is a comet but im not sure and I cant remember at all what the old one is. I've attached some photos, the old one is the bigger yellow one, also the tank is new i moved them in newly with the new fish. I ordered a bubbler to oxygenate it as I know the round type is not ideal for oxygen. However, today I noticed the new one is actually sort of chasing the old one around and the old one seems to dart away quiet a lot but the new one persists to follow it and sometimes he nibbles the old one.
IMO, comets need 60 gallons as adults. They get 12 inches. They are best as pond fish. It appears you have them in a bowl with little or no filtration, which is bound to cause problems.

They don’t look to great from the photos, are they active and moving around at all?

I would do a water water change and get a test kit and test the ammonia ASAP. Ammonia could be going through the roof in a little tank like that. I would very highly recommend getting a larger tank (preferably at least a 30 gallon or so) temporarily so you can manage the ammonia and nitrate levels and they have a somewhat decent tank for the time being. And search for a good pond for them to go to when they are bigger. Btw, average lifespan for these guys is 10-14 years if they are kept in a good environment.

I’ll link an article explaining the nitrogen cycle for you to read, it might help you.
 
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Anastasia01

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Frisbee said:
IMO, comets need 60 gallons as adults. They get 12 inches. They are best as pond fish. It appears you have them in a bowl with little or no filtration, which is bound to cause problems.

They don’t look to great from the photos, are they active and moving around at all?

I would do a water water change and get a test kit and test the ammonia ASAP. Ammonia could be going through the roof in a little tank like that. I would very highly recommend getting a larger tank (preferably at least a 30 gallon or so) temporarily so you can manage the ammonia and nitrate levels and they have a somewhat decent tank for the time being. And search for a good pond for them to go to when they are bigger. Btw, average lifespan for these guys is 10-14 years if they are kept in a good environment.

I’ll link an article explaining the nitrogen cycle for you to read, it might help you.
Oh that is concerning, ill definitely see if I can get my hands on a proper tank and testing kit ASAP. Thank you for the advice.
 

NevermindIgnoreMe

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They don't actually look too bad as far at their appearance. I can't tell if they are bottom sitting really bad because it's not a video of course, so behavioural symptoms should indicate sickness or poisoning. Do test your tank, nitrate should be under 35-40, nitrite and ammonia should be zero, ph should be between 6-8, preferably around 7.4. That's the general overview anyway.

And to warn you, a new goldfish can bring nasty infections and parasites, which this one may have, I might add some aquarium salt. Also, while goldfish CAN grow large, they don't always, and won't in a smaller tank, though it's not necessarily an issue imo. As long as you have consistently healthy water parameters and adequate swimming room the # of gallons isn't super important.
 
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Anastasia01

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NevermindIgnoreMe said:
They don't actually look too bad as far at their appearance. I can't tell if they are bottom sitting really bad because it's not a video of course, so behavioural symptoms should indicate sickness or poisoning. Do test your tank, nitrate should be under 35-40, nitrite and ammonia should be zero, ph should be between 6-8, preferably around 7.4. That's the general overview anyway.

And to warn you, a new goldfish can bring nasty infections and parasites, which this one may have, I might add some aquarium salt. Also, while goldfish CAN grow large, they don't always, and won't in a smaller tank, though it's not necessarily an issue imo. As long as you have consistently healthy water parameters and adequate swimming room the # of gallons isn't super important.
Hmm OK the testing kit should be arriving tomorrow. Thank you for the advice.
 

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