New Ghost Shrimps

Wolf010
  • #1
I'm getting 4 new ghost shrimps to add to my Betta tank later, which I'm planning to add in with a 30% water change to my two week old Betta tank. Is there anything I should be particularly careful of? Thanks
 
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EbiAqua
  • #2
How big is the tank? I recommend 5-10 gallons if you're adding shrimp.

Also two weeks isn't very mature, if it's even cycled. I recommend letting the tank fully cycle, then giving it a few more weeks before adding shrimp.
 
Wolf010
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
Yup, my tank is a 10 gallon with multiple plants and only a single Betta, I was worried that the bio load was too low for the plants
 

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EbiAqua
  • #4
Yup, my tank is a 10 gallon with multiple plants and only a single Betta, I was worried that the bio load was too low for the plants

Well shrimps' bioloads are so tiny they're practically nonexistent. Java ferns are easy and grow slowly, though.

Do you have a way to test your water and post parameters?
 
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BlackOsprey
  • #5
Ghost shrimp bioload is minuscule so their inclusion wouldn't help much on that front. If you're worried about your plants getting enough nutrients, get a liquid fertilizer like Easy Green.
 
Wolf010
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
Hmmm, then what else can I add in a 10 gallon that can help in bioload?
 
EbiAqua
  • #7
Hmmm, then what else can I add in a 10 gallon that can help in bioload?

Why do you want to increase bioload? It's better to just dose a comprehensive fertilizer to help your plants out rather than adding livestock.
 
Momgoose56
  • #8
I'm getting 4 new ghost shrimps to add to my Betta tank later, which I'm planning to add in with a 30% water change to my two week old Betta tank. Is there anything I should be particularly careful of? Thanks
You should be careful to check your tank ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels and get your tank cycled before you put any shrimp in there or you'll be fertilizing your plants with dead shrimp.
 
Wolf010
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
You should be careful to check your tank ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels and get your tank cycled before you put any shrimp in there or you'll be fertilizing your plants with dead shrimp.
Wouldn't a two week old tank be witha fish in it be cycled by two weeks already? And aI'm not too worried about my levels as I do 30% water change every 3 days starting today
 
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Momgoose56
  • #10
Wouldn't a two week old tank be witha fish in it be cycled by two weeks already? And aI'm not too worried about my levels as I do 30% water change every 3 days starting today
No, it takes several weeks (6 to 8) to cycle a tank with a fish in it. Doing 30% water changes every 3 days will probably keep your ammonia levels near zero and keep your fish safe. However, by continually removing the ammonia, your tank may take months to cycle if ever. If you never have to leave your tank for more than 3 days or have someone to do them for you if you are gone more than 3 days that may work fine.
 
Wolf010
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
But I didn't change water for the two weeks my fish was in, wouldn't that have been enough increase the beneficial bacteria to a good level?
 
EbiAqua
  • #12
But I didn't change water for the two weeks my fish was in, wouldn't that have been enough increase the beneficial bacteria to a good level?
Unless you were supplementing with bottled bacteria then no. A betta has a small bioload, it would take over a month to cycle a 10 gallon with a single betta's bioload. Adding shrimp isn't a good idea as they are much more sensitive to even small concentrations of ammonia, even .25ppm is lethal.
 
Wolf010
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
Ah, ok, thanks for the information, I guess I'll wait a few more weeks before I add the shrimps
 
Momgoose56
  • #14
Ah, ok, thanks for the information, I guess I'll wait a few more weeks before I add the shrimps
If you get a test kit, you'll know when youe tank is cycled.
 
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Wolf010
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
Just one last qsn, if I were take some filter media from a pond that is currently 4 years old and add it to my tank, would that help to instantly cycle the tank?
 
Momgoose56
  • #16
Just one last qsn, if I were take some filter media from a pond that is currently 4 years old and add it to my tank, would that help to instantly cycle the tank?
It definitely could. If there are fish in the pond and they are healthy. The only way you would know for sure that it IS cycled though, is by testing the water.
 
EbiAqua
  • #17
If you have cycled pond media it would cycle your tank almost instantly.
 
SnailsGalore
  • #18
Hmmm, then what else can I add in a 10 gallon that can help in bioload?
After you finish cycling your tank, you could always get a mystery snail. I have 10 gallon with a betta, 1 mystery, and ghost shrimp, and it has worked out really well. My live plants in there are thriving, and the tank stays pretty clean compared to my others. Good luck!
 
Wolf010
  • Thread Starter
  • #19
Don't mystery snail, I think, they are also known as apple snails eat a lot and grow pretty large? Pls correct me if I'm wrong.
 
EbiAqua
  • #20
Don't mystery snail, I think, they are also known as apple snails eat a lot and grow pretty large? Pls correct me if I'm wrong.

They get roughly golf-ball sized, but most stay smaller. My cousin has one in his 7 gallon and it doesn't cause issues, he just drops a quarter of an algae wafer in once or twice a week. The tank is heavily planted so water quality is always good.
 

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