New Betta Fish And Owner

Cowboikid
  • #1
So I just got my betta his name is Ghost, I haven't added him to the tank yet. I've done testing on my water though. I am at 0ppm ammonia 0ppm nitrites, and 40 ppm nitrates 82*F. I heard in a video by lifewithpets (a well made youtube channel) that you want to get them out of the nasty pet store water as soon as possible which I am all about, but how do I correctly transfer my boy from the pet store container to new water without using a net, or my hands. I do not fish to hurt him, I just want the best for him. Thank you for any help.
 
Lorekeeper
  • #2
I'd do a water change to get your nitrates down to below 20 first.

Second, gently pour him and his bowl water out into a container, and begin acclimating him to your tank water. Drip acclimation is a bit overkill for a betta, but it's probably the smoothest acclimation. If you don't want to drip, just add in a small amount of your tank water every 3-5 minutes until the water is mostly your water, then fish him out and add him to the tank (without adding any of the water in the container to the tank).
 
Cowboikid
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
Thank you for the advice on moving him. So my nitrates are too high, and you're suggesting that I do a water change. I understand that, but the water that is in there was just put into today.
 
Lorekeeper
  • #4
Thank you for the advice on moving him. So my nitrates are too high, and you're suggesting that I do a water change. I understand that, but the water that is in there was just put into today.
Are you sure that you did your testing right?

40 PPM nitrates suggests that you've either had a small ammonia source in the tank for quite a while (like you might do while cycling a tank with ammonia) or a large dose of ammonia all at once (like pure ammonia from a bottle, dosed to 2-4PPM). If you just replaced that water today, I'd ensure that your tap doesn't have any nitrate.

You did cycle the tank, correct?
 
Cowboikid
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
Am I sure that I did my testing right. Honestly no. this is the 1st time I've tested water in anything besides a pool. I will post a picture after this post.
I did use a water conditioner. (API Betta water conditioner)

Here is a picture of the test. So basically I removed the tab placed it in the water, then swirled it 2 times removed it from the water then stuck it to the side of the bottle.
 

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InsanityShard
  • #6
You can cycle the tank with the betta in it, but it'll be a bit hard on it. You should read up everything you can on the Nitrogen cycle, as it's absolutely vital to the fish. Also, what size tank is it, and what else is in it? Live plants are incredibly useful to the cycle. Gravel and ornaments hold the beneficial bacteria too, not just the filter sponges and stuff. If you need a rundown on the basics of fish care, here goes:

The Nitrogen cycle, the most important thing to tank keeping, can be helped along using certain additives such as Tetra Safe Start, Bioboost or Aquarium Kick Start. Do not mix multiple tank starts. They will NOT cycle your tank in a week or two, and should be continually added for the first 4 months to be sure the cycle is complete. After the initial month of dosing, you need to start lowering the dosage slowly so the bacteria can gradually aclimitate to a natural lifecycle rather than relying on the bottle.

Filters are absolutely nescesary, as are heaters in the winter. While bettas are labyrinth fish (air breathers) this does not mean the tank doesn't have to be aerated. More oxygen helps keep everything healthy. When you do get a filter, make sure it's either got a very low flow or is a waterfall filter. Bettas are very sensitive to water currents, as their flashy fins make them poor swimmers it can cause stress. Try to get a filter for a larger tank than you have. This ensures the filter can cope with the waste.

When cleaning things from a fish tank, never used chemicals unless they're specifically for tanks. Always keep things such as the filter media (sponges, those white rings, activated charcoal e.t.c) in tank water and expose it to as little air as possible. The bacteria mostly lives inside filters, where they get water flow and the ammonia they feed on. I strongly recommend you get a bucket just for cleaning the tank ornaments and stuff in, so it won't get contaminated by chemicals from things like soaps or detergents. Plastic is porus, and can hold enough detergent to harm your cycle even weeks after exposure.

Thoroughly check all ornaments, filters, gravel or really anything you put in your tank for sharp sections. Bettas like to rest on things, and their fins are very fragile. They can get sick enough to die if their fins are torn. A common test is to get a fine stocking and rub it on them. If it tears, don't add it.

Bettas are a tropical fish, and need warmth. The tank should be between 22c and 28c, or 77f to 86f. Many people don't realise this and they die from cold during the night. They also prefer soft water (low hardness), but if your PH is 6 it's too acidic and will harm the fish. They have very specific safe parameters.

Be wary of how much you feed your betta. Their stomachs tend to be about the size of their eyes, but they'll keep eating as much as you feed them. You should feed them only twice a day, and many people recommend fasting them once a week. While they do eat things such as mosquito larvae, don't take anything from the wild for your tank unless you're absolutely sure you know how to treat it correctly. You never know what parasites or deseises they may bring into your tank.

Lights are needed for plants. Plants are a favourite of bettas as far as I know, always soft so they can't harm themselves, they love resting on them. They also help your tank cycle. Always quarantine them before adding to your tank, however, as they may bring pests. If you get algae, don't worry, just use the lights less. It's usually harmless, though there are some nasty ones that are pretty toxic.

Bettas do better in tanks that are at least 2.5 gallons. While many tell you they live in tiny puddles, that's only in very extreme conditions and they can't survive it very long. Their natural behaviour in unfavourable conditions is to jump. If your fish is jumping, check your water. There'll be something wrong or stressing the fish. A mesh or otherwise areated lid is nescesary as they require fresh air.

They're also incredibly terrortorial. Don't add any tank mates unless it's something you either don't mind losing, or something like a big snail. Adding other fish, especially brightly coloured ones, is a big no no. While there are some calm and friendly fighters out there, you can't be sure until you try. Fighter fish can also be stressed by having small, brightly coloured objects near or in their tank, as they may mistake it for a rival. Sometimes people put mirrors in, but leaving them in long term will also stress the fish.

When doing water changes, I strongly recommend you clean the filters before and after every single time, as well as cleaning the ornaments and checking under and in them for any food or poop stuck inside. I can't count the amount of times I've had an ammonia spike, only to pick up and ornament and find a load of dung managed to get under it from a tiny hole or a bunch of food hoarded in a cave by my bristlenose catfish. Be sure to use a tank sponge to wipe down the tank glass if you don't have one of those nice magnetic sponges, even if it looks clean.


Sorry this is so long, just typing up everything I can think of you'll need. I hope this helps, and you'll find much more information on this site. =D
Edit: Also, I've used those strips before. They're not as accurate as a full liquid testing kit. You're supposed to leave them in the water for 20 seconds, lightly stirring it, and then wait as while for the results. I'm pretty sure it was only a minute or so after it comes out of the water that you look, but it should be written on the bottle anyway.
 
Cowboikid
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
So I am going to reply to your post InsanityShard as I read it.
Just so it's known, I currently do not have the fish in the tank.
My tank is 5 gallons. I have a gravel in the tank as well as some brightly colored blue stones, and some pearly white stones.
Currently I have one live plant in the tank. I am planing on getting more plants looking for floaters to he can have some where to hide in the top of the tank.
The tank has a built in filter, that is very gentle, no visible currents are made in the tank. I also have a heater, but as it currently stands the water is 81*F and as sat around 80-82*F so I haven't put the heater in the water yet.
Thank you for the cleaning tips I actually didn't know about not exposing the media to the air, and I will get a bucket tomorrow.
I made sure to try rub my hands across all my decor before I bought it, I turned down a lot of them because they were too rough or sharp.
I have a water softener system as well as a reverse osmosis water filter system. The Ph seems to be somewhere between 7-7.5 it'd say closer to 7.
I have to say what scares me the most is learning how much to feed the boy.
I have a light over the tank its a bar light with 18 led lights. ( I don't know if that is good enough or too much for my live plant.)
I considered the 2.5 gallon tank, but decided to spend a little more, and get the 5 gallon tank.
I want to get snails for my boy, like some nerite zebra snails. also thank you for the tip about bright colored objects near the tank, I hadn't considered that. (Concern about the snails though I am scared to introduce snails because I know that snails can carry parasites, and I don't want my boy to get effected.)
I really appreciate you taking the time to type all of this out for me, and everyone who has the same question as I did. you've been really helpful and given me more insight into keeping my boy happy. Also thank you for the strip info it doesn't say anything about leaving the strip in for any period of time. I will be getting the liquid test kit, but it was a matter cost. I picked the cheap way, and made the wrong choice.
 
InsanityShard
  • #8
Sorry this reply is a bit late- when it comes to filters, you'll find the ones that come with tanks tend to be too small, though maybe not with a betta tank. The testing strips aren't the wrong choice, they do work, just not for massively sensitive fish like angelfish which just 5 ppm of Nitrates can harm. While snails can carry parasites, they can be quarantined and treated to be safe. As for the heat, good, I live in a tropical area too so I only use a heater in the winter. Make sure that temperature doesn't drop too low at night when the lights are off. My tanks can drop up to 3c at night during the Summer, and it's much colder at night in cooler months. When it comes to the light, I have no idea what that kind is like, so it may or may not be enough. My bettas old tank just had light from a window and that was enough for his banana plant, though it took off in his newer 10 gallon. XD Good luck! I hope to see pics of Ghost soon. =P
 
Cowboikid
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
So I did a 50% water changed and my nitrate levels dropped I would say they are around 20-25ish. So I decided to get ghost out of the tiny cup and move him into his tank. I also decided to put the heater in cause I noticed in a drop in the water temp over night so to keep a consistent temp I set it up, staying at 78*F now. Also I added some pictures of the little guy I hope you like him.


IMG_20180220_173905.jpg
IMG_20180221_012939.jpg
 
InsanityShard
  • #10
He's beautiful. <3 Seems to be a Delta tail, but I don't know my tail types too well. XD
 
Biiba
  • #11
Wow he’s a stunner
 
Skye_marilyn
  • #12
So I just got my betta his name is Ghost, I haven't added him to the tank yet. I've done testing on my water though. I am at 0ppm ammonia 0ppm nitrites, and 40 ppm nitrates 82*F. I heard in a video by lifewithpets (a well made youtube channel) that you want to get them out of the nasty pet store water as soon as possible which I am all about, but how do I correctly transfer my boy from the pet store container to new water without using a net, or my hands. I do not fish to hurt him, I just want the best for him. Thank you for any help.
I love him, he’s gorgeous. I also really like lifewithpets channel, Sheila is an amazing aquarist with well made videos.
 
Biiba
  • #13
I like life with pets too!!!
 
HaileStorm
  • #14
Beautiful betta! I'm in the middle of cycling too, I have a betta and a plant in a 23g tank. So far the little guy's been pretty active. He knows where to go when it's feeding time.

My water temp ranges from 25°c to 28°c since I live in the tropics. He's okay with it but I intend to buy a temperature regulator of sorts which turns the aquarium fan on if the water temp breaches 28°c.
 
sarah zehowski
  • #15
So I did a 50% water changed and my nitrate levels dropped I would say they are around 20-25ish. So I decided to get ghost out of the tiny cup and move him into his tank. I also decided to put the heater in cause I noticed in a drop in the water temp over night so to keep a consistent temp I set it up, staying at 78*F now. Also I added some pictures of the little guy I hope you like him.

View attachment 411727 View attachment 411728


He’s so pretty! I’ve never seen a white betta in person lol My local shops have never had them.
 

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