New 29 gallon

  • Thread starter

Deepdownunder

New Member
Messages
17
Reaction score
0
Points
151
Hey,
I've just got a new 29 gallon freshwater tank setup, and I'm ready to start introducing some fish to the tank. Any suggestions on some cool looking, hardy fish (that aren't gonna break the bank) that would be good to add?
Thanks
 

Isabella

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,250
Reaction score
37
Points
358
Experience
5 years
Welcome to Fish Lore!

It's a good thing you haven't stocked your tank yet. This is because you need to first learn about the Nitrogen Cycle. And you must be patient. Here is information about the Nitrogen Cycle: https://www.fishlore.com/NitrogenCycle.htm, and here are the rest of important beginner's articles: https://www.fishlore.com/Beginners.htm.

After you have learned about the Nitrogen Cycle, you'll understand why it is not safe to stock your tank right away (If you do, you may lose all of your fish). You need to wait until your tank is cycled first. This takes about a month (may take faster or longer - every tank is different).

If you are patient and decide to wait until your tank is cycled, you will not regret it and your fish will be fine. You'll also have more time to research the fish you want and to see if they're compatible with a 29 gallon tank. You'll also have the time to see which species of fish are and are not compatible with each other.

Good luck
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Deepdownunder

New Member
Messages
17
Reaction score
0
Points
151
Isabella said:
Welcome to Fish Lore!

It's a good thing you haven't stocked your tank yet. This is because you need to first learn about the Nitrogen Cycle. And you must be patient. Here is information about the Nitrogen Cycle: https://www.fishlore.com/NitrogenCycle.htm, and here are the rest of important beginner's articles: https://www.fishlore.com/Beginners.htm.

After you have learned about the Nitrogen Cycle, you'll understand why it is not safe to stock your tank right away (If you do, you may lose all of your fish). You need to wait until your tank is cycled first. This takes about a month (may take faster or longer - every tank is different).

If you are patient and decide to wait until your tank is cycled, you will not regret it and your fish will be fine. You'll also have more time to research the fish you want and to see if they're compatible with a 29 gallon tank. You'll also have the time to see which species of fish are and are not compatible with each other.

Good luck
Thanks for the info...a couple more questions

My tank has been running for about 72-75 hours now, and I'm curious about a couple things:

1) My heater is set to about 74 degrees F....but my thermometer reads about 79-80. The only thing I can think of is that my thermometer might be reading the water temp wrong because it is right next to the heater. When i set up my aquarium i made a mistake in putting the heater and thermometer together. Could this be the problem with the different readings?

2) My PH is at about 8.3. From what I've been reading, the ideal PH is from 6.4-7.5. Is this true? And if so how do I go about lowering my PH? Or is it fine, because it is steady, and not fluctuating.
 

Isabella

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,250
Reaction score
37
Points
358
Experience
5 years
Well, what kind of a heater do you have? Submersible heaters tend to be more reliable than the clip-on heaters. It certainly could be that the thermometer gets a higher temp. reading from what it actually is. But it also could be that your water flow is too weak, which causes the heat to be distributed unevenly. Maybe get another thermometer for the other end of the tank. Then see what happens. (I assume you're not getting the fish until the tank is cycled, so you have the time to get another little cheap thermometer.) Also, what filter do you have? Do you know how many gallons per hour (gph) does it pump? It should be on the filter's box, and if not, you should be able to find it out online. I'd suggest a bit higher temperature for tropical fish, something like 76F at least (but not more than 80F, unless the fish are sick). But .. you don't have the fish yet, so maybe we should talk about temp. when you have the fish. Some fish like higher temp's while other fish like lower temp's.

As for the pH ... it's never really good to try to alter the pH chemically (i.e. by using pH adjusters from a fish store). This is because sudden pH increases or decreases are very harmful to fish. And if you started to use some pH adjuster, you'd have to use it all the time. Imagine you try to keep it at 7.0 all the time, and you forget it once, or something goes wrong, and the pH goes back to 8.0 - in this case you could have a tank full of sick - or worse yet: dead - fish. For this reason it's better to get fish that naturally like a higher pH, than to get fish that like low pH and continuously alter that pH. Besides, constantly altering pH will almost certainly be causing pH fluctuations in the tank.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Deepdownunder

New Member
Messages
17
Reaction score
0
Points
151
Isabella said:
Well, what kind of a heater do you have? Submersible heaters tend to be more reliable than the clip-on heaters. It certainly could be that the thermometer gets a higher temp. reading from what it actually is. But it also could be that your water flow is too weak, which causes the heat to be distributed unevenly. Maybe get another thermometer for the other end of the tank. Then see what happens. (I assume you're not getting the fish until the tank is cycled, so you have the time to get another little cheap thermometer.) Also, what filter do you have? Do you know how many gallons per hour (gph) does it pump? It should be on the filter's box, and if not, you should be able to find it out online. I'd suggest a bit higher temperature for tropical fish, something like 76F at least (but not more than 80F, unless the fish are sick). But .. you don't have the fish yet, so maybe we should talk about temp. when you have the fish. Some fish like higher temp's while other fish like lower temp's.

As for the pH ... it's never really good to try to alter the pH chemically (i.e. by using pH adjusters from a fish store). This is because sudden pH increases or decreases are very harmful to fish. And if you started to use some pH adjuster, you'd have to use it all the time. Imagine you try to keep it at 7.0 all the time, and you forget it once, or something goes wrong, and the pH goes back to 8.0 - in this case you could have a tank full of sick - or worse yet: dead - fish. For this reason it's better to get fish that naturally like a higher pH, than to get fish that like low pH and continuously alter that pH. Besides, constantly altering pH will almost certainly be causing pH fluctuations in the tank.
Thanks again for the responses....

I have a fully submersible 100 watt heater....and a Topfin Whisper Filter 30.
If that gives you anymore info.
 

Isabella

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,250
Reaction score
37
Points
358
Experience
5 years
I have a 30 gallon tank and I have a 150W heater in it. But maybe you can get away with a 100W heater - not sure, you'd have to ask what others think on Fish Lore.

Do you know how many gallons per hour your filter pumps? It should say on the filter's box (it should say it pumps "this-or-that-many" GPH). If you cannot find it on the box, go to any online fish store and find your filter brand and size. it should tell there also how many GPH your filter pumps.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Deepdownunder

New Member
Messages
17
Reaction score
0
Points
151
Isabella said:
I have a 30 gallon tank and I have a 150W heater in it. But maybe you can get away with a 100W heater - not sure, you'd have to ask what others think on Fish Lore.

Do you know how many gallons per hour your filter pumps? It should say on the filter's box (it should say it pumps "this-or-that-many" GPH). If you cannot find it on the box, go to any online fish store and find your filter brand and size. it should tell there also how many GPH your filter pumps.
The filter actually came with a boxed starter set, made for the 29 gallon tank, so it doesn't have the retail box, and the manual is generic (referring to different models)....but I would think that the filter is good enough, since it came with the 29 gallon tank, but maybe you more experienced folks know more about that.
 

JMatt1983

Valued Member
Messages
278
Reaction score
0
Points
186
easiest way to find out is to go the manufacturers website
 

0morrokh

Fishlore VIP
Messages
4,476
Reaction score
7
Points
208
Experience
5 to 10 years
Ignore whatever the manufacturer says. The rule for heaters is 5 watts per gal. My 100W heater barely keeps the temp up on my 20 long so I don't think you can safely trust it to heat a 29.

About your pH, you'll read tons of stuff that says fish have certain pH limits (none of which will go up to 8.3, except maybe Cichlids)...but it is a lot harder on fish to have a fluctuating pH which will invariably be caused by pH altering chemicals. Anyway, the pH at your fish store will probably be the same as your tap water so the fish will already be adjusted. Your fish will be perfectly fine. I have kept plenty "delicate, soft water fish" in my water (which is right up there with yours as far as pH) and they are doing great.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Deepdownunder

New Member
Messages
17
Reaction score
0
Points
151
0morrokh said:
Ignore whatever the manufacturer says. The rule for heaters is 5 watts per gal. My 100W heater barely keeps the temp up on my 20 long so I don't think you can safely trust it to heat a 29.

About your pH, you'll read tons of stuff that says fish have certain pH limits (none of which will go up to 8.3, except maybe Cichlids)...but it is a lot harder on fish to have a fluctuating pH which will invariably be caused by pH altering chemicals. Anyway, the pH at your fish store will probably be the same as your tap water so the fish will already be adjusted. Your fish will be perfectly fine. I have kept plenty "delicate, soft water fish" in my water (which is right up there with yours as far as pH) and they are doing great.
Alright....thanks for the help, its greatly appreciated.
 

Guzalot

Valued Member
Messages
103
Reaction score
0
Points
176
Experience
More than 10 years
I have a 29 gal tank myself and I had originaly priced some of the "starter kits" myself. They tend to give you the absolute bare minimum equipment for your tank to keep the cost down. The Whisper 30 filter, for example, filters 145 gal per hour and most experts seem to recomend 10 gph per gallon of your tank. Personaly, I use a Whisper 60 for my 29 gal (rated at 330 gph) and it's been great. Obviously you're stuck with what you have, so I'd recommend spending another $20 and getting a second Whisper 30.

Don't let this discourage you, fishkeeping is a very rewarding hobby! Once your tank is cycled and your fish are thriving you'll be rewarded for your patience and work.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom