Neon Tetras Keep Dying?

fishy098

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Yesterday I got 6 neon tetras and a male betta. They live in a 10 gallon tank that's 79 degrees Fahrenheit. Today I woke up to find one tetra in the filter, and 3 dead. As of right now I have one healthy tetra, and one who is swimming weakly (upside down, sideways, etc.). The betta doesn't seem to be bothering the tetras, so I don't think he's the reason they're dying. What could be causing them all to die?
 

Goldiemom

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Your tank is NOT cycled. That product, though good, is misleading. It is a bacteria and will help speed up the cycle but does not make an instant cycle. You still have to give time for the bacteria to grow which can be about 4 weeks. Do you have any fish in tank still? If not, you can do a fishless cycle which can take less than 2 weeks. If you have fish, you will have to do the fish in cycle. Let me know if you do have fish or not. Then we can go from there. The uncycled tank is what is killing the fish.

Just saw that you do have fish still. Read up on fish in cycle. You will have to keep testing the water and doing water changes to keep ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates down. These are poisonous to your fish. Test daily to see what your ammonia level is. You will need a test kit to do this. I don't recommend test strips, get the API Master Test Kit. If ammonia is higher than .25, do a partial water change. Once it starts going down on its own, you will begin seeing nitrites. Again, don't let them get too high. If either of them, the ammonia or nitrites do get too high, do a partial water change. Eventually, you will see nitrates. When they show up your ammonia and nitrites should start reading 0. Once they continue to stay at 0, you are cycled. Watch the nitrates though too. Don't let them get above 20 ppm. If they do, do another pwc. You will have to monitor closely everyday to keep the ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates from getting too high and killing the fish. Do you have access to any gravel or filter floss from another running tank that is cycled? If so, put some of that in the tank as it will already have bacteria on it to speed up the cycle. You can also dose daily with PRIME to keep the ammonia and nitrites from killing the fish until you have the tank cycled. If you have questions, just ask.
 
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fishy098

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Goldiemom said:
Just saw that you do have fish still. Read up on fish in cycle. You will have to keep testing the water and doing water changes to keep ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates down. These are poisonous to your fish. Test daily to see what your ammonia level is. You will need a test kit to do this. I don't recommend test strips, get the API Master Test Kit. If ammonia is higher than .25, do a partial water change. Once it starts going down on its own, you will begin seeing nitrites. Again, don't let them get too high. If either of them, the ammonia or nitrites do get too high, do a partial water change. Eventually, you will see nitrates. When they show up your ammonia and nitrites should start reading 0. Once they continue to stay at 0, you are cycled. Watch the nitrates though too. Don't let them get above 20 ppm. If they do, do another pwc. You will have to monitor closely everyday to keep the ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates from getting too high and killing the fish. Do you have access to any gravel or filter floss from another running tank that is cycled? If so, put some of that in the tank as it will already have bacteria on it to speed up the cycle. You can also dose daily with PRIME to keep the ammonia and nitrites from killing the fish until you have the tank cycled. If you have questions, just ask.
Thank you!
 

Rainy day

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Neon tetras won't do well in a 10 gallon, you should really have a 15 gallon at the very least to house them. Furthermore, they don't like changes in water parameters and I'm assuming you didn't drip acclimate. Parameter shock coupled with ammonia is what likely got them.
 

david1978

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Neons seem to be very sickly lately. Probably from being mass produced and inbred. Also yes a 10 is a little small since they like to be in schools. And with a betta they can be quite territorial so its not really recommended to have othe fish with one in anything smaller than a 20 gallon tank so the other fish have room to run and vise versa.
 

Adriana N

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You probably acclimated them wrong. They are very sensitive fish and need to be acclimated slowly and carefully. Do it up for an hour, until their water has doubled, dropping acclimating, or adding water every ten minutes.

I personally would not put neons in a 10g. Once you see them in a larger tank, you'll see what I mean.
 

Fizzfrog

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As people have said before, lack of acclimation and an uncycled tank are probably to blame for their deaths. I would rehome them; they're not temperature compatible with bettas and the tank is too small for them. They need a 20 long. If you want to get more in the future, cycle the tank properly first, and then slowly drip acclimate.
 

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