Neon Tetras dissapearing/ Bacterial Infection?

mmsboulder

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I have a 40 gallon tank that I started at the beginning of September. I have it stocked with:
2 Neon Tetras
1 Pearl Gourami
1 Skirt Tetra
1 Koi Anglefish
1 Blue Cory
3 Longfin Cherry Barbs
1 Red Severum

I don't have a home test kit, but had my water tested two days ago when I went to my local fish store, and he said my water was perfect other than slightly high PH, which is normal because of our local water supply.

When I first started my tank, the first fish I tried to add after my "starter fish" from my old tank, was a school of 7 Rasboras. They all died within less than 24 hours. I tried another type of small schooling tetra,( I forget the type exactly) and they all died within 72 hours. Discouraged, I tried bigger fish with success.
Now the tank is ready for a small school again. I bought a school of 7 Neon tetras along with a mesh breeder cage. I kept the tetras in the cage for 2 1/2 days before releasing them into the tank. They did fine for the first few days. Then I found two bodies. I could see three schooling, but two bodies were missing. I assumed they got eaten after death. The three remaining neons seemed to do Ok, and I planned to get more once my local fish store stocked them again next Wednesday. In the meantime, I decided it was best to let go of one of my blackskirt tetras who was VERY aggressive. The guy at the fish store thought that was a good idea.
This afternoon I went to check on them, and discovered another neon had dissapeared. I searched the tank, but the body could not be found. While I was searching, I noticed strange white splotches on one of the neon's heads. I inspected the other fish, but didn't see anything. I was worried that it was a bacterial infection my other fish my catch, so I took both neons out of the tank and into a jar. What now?

Any suggestions on what to do now would by appreciated. Thanks!
 

gadgetgirl01

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When I first started and had a high mortality rate it was because I didn't know about tank cycling. Also high pH municipality water also means very hard water and high chlorine. Prime removes 1ppm of chlorine. Our tap water contains 2 ppm. Your LFS probably knows and you could ask. Last, I had spots that looked grayish white and it was a bacterial infection. White spots that are on the body and fins that look like salt is ich.

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Fish Lore Aquarium Fish Forum mobile app
 
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mmsboulder

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I did cycle the tank with the fish from my old tank. I do use drops to help the water when I add new water. I thought that was taking care of the hard water problems but maybe not. It doesn't look like ICH. I was suspecting a bacterial infection.
Since I am getting more neon tetras anyway, should I not worry about treating the remaing two? If I should treat them, how? Thanks for your thoughts!
 

Bithimala

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Just my two cents, neons are really fragile and sensitive. They look awesome and are frequently listed as beginner level fish. Some people have great success with them, but a lot of people I know, even those in the hobby for years, just cannot keep them alive.

Not sure about the disease. Do you think you could possibly post a picture? Maybe someone with more fish disease experience can weigh in, but the more info you can provide, the better
 

jreinhart

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mmsboulder said:
I have a 40 gallon tank that I started at the beginning of September. I have it stocked with:
2 Neon Tetras
1 Pearl Gourami
1 Skirt Tetra
1 Koi Anglefish
1 Blue Cory
3 Longfin Cherry Barbs
1 Red Severum

I don't have a home test kit, but had my water tested two days ago when I went to my local fish store, and he said my water was perfect other than slightly high PH, which is normal because of our local water supply.

When I first started my tank, the first fish I tried to add after my "starter fish" from my old tank, was a school of 7 Rasboras. They all died within less than 24 hours. I tried another type of small schooling tetra,( I forget the type exactly) and they all died within 72 hours. Discouraged, I tried bigger fish with success.
Now the tank is ready for a small school again. I bought a school of 7 Neon tetras along with a mesh breeder cage. I kept the tetras in the cage for 2 1/2 days before releasing them into the tank. They did fine for the first few days. Then I found two bodies. I could see three schooling, but two bodies were missing. I assumed they got eaten after death. The three remaining neons seemed to do Ok, and I planned to get more once my local fish store stocked them again next Wednesday. In the meantime, I decided it was best to let go of one of my blackskirt tetras who was VERY aggressive. The guy at the fish store thought that was a good idea.
This afternoon I went to check on them, and discovered another neon had dissapeared. I searched the tank, but the body could not be found. While I was searching, I noticed strange white splotches on one of the neon's heads. I inspected the other fish, but didn't see anything. I was worried that it was a bacterial infection my other fish my catch, so I took both neons out of the tank and into a jar. What now?

Any suggestions on what to do now would by appreciated. Thanks!
I don't have anything useful to say regarding potential disease but I noticed you say there is a Koi Angelfish in the tank with the Neon Tetras.

Angelfish will eat ANYTHING that can fit in its mouth. I have Cardinal Tetras, which get bigger than Neons. At one point I wanted to get Angels for my tank but was cautioned against it because the Angels would eat the Cardinal Tetras. If Angels will eat Cardinal Tetras they will absolutely eat Neons. To a Koi Angelfish a Neon Tetra would be a tasty snack.

Also, I see you have some barbs and a Severum plus a Pearl Gourami. I've heard that barbs can be aggressive towards some other species and that some severums and perhaps the Pearl Gourami could also be aggressive towards smaller fish too. I'd ask that someone more knowledgeable on the husbandry and species stocking chime in on that.

From my limited research I know that some Gouramis are safe with community fish & small tetras and some are not. Have heard that Severums will eat smaller tetras such as the Neons (or Cardinals, etc)....it may depend on the individual fish.

Not trying to be a buzz kill but that's what popped out at me.

Also, have you looked at https://www.fishlore.com/Disease.htm for the diseases. You may have ich if you have white spots. Ich tends to be common in fish stores.
 

uncfan

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I agree the angel will eat the neons. They eats neons in the wild, and the Severum will eat anything that will fit in its mouth.
 

jreinhart

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uncfan said:
I agree the angel will eat the neons. They eats neons in the wild, and the Severum will eat anything that will fit in its mouth.
mmsboulder maybe the pet store will take back the larger fish or you could return the Neons and just stick with appropriate cichlids that can live together?
 

uncfan

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Or see of they will take back the Severum and the Angel and do a community tank. Always research before you buy fish, make sure everybody will be happy and not food.
 

el337

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Hi,

Did your LFS use a liquid test kit? Did they give you the exact parameters for ammonia, nitrite and nitrates? I highly recommend getting your own test kit to check your water parameters since a lot of shops use test strips which are inaccurate. Many of us would recommend the API Freshwater Master Test Kit. You experienced a lot of fish casualties and if it were me, I would want to rule out any issues with my water quality first before adding any more fish.

That said, you also have 4 types of schooling/shoaling fish. Are you planning on completing the schools for each? If not, I'd re-home them.
 
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mmsboulder

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My LFS does use a liquid test kit, and I trust them. However I have looked into getting a test kit in the past. The only ones I could seem to find were seperate products for each test. Each was very expensive,( between $15 and $20,) and at the time I deemed it not worth it. Should I get one? If so is there a better less expensive option?
As for the stocking advice, I think you are correct that the Angelfish and/or the Severum are the culprits. For now I think I will stick with larger fish that are more compatible in my tank. el337, I was not planning on completing the schools, other than the neons, which I have decided against. I will get rid of the remaining neons. For the black skirt, I was told they are better in schools but not totally necessary. For the barbs, my LFS told me a school was 3+. Was the other schooling fish you were referring to the cory? Is this all correct info?

Thanks so much for all your help!
 

el337

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mmsboulder said:
My LFS does use a liquid test kit, and I trust them. However I have looked into getting a test kit in the past. The only ones I could seem to find were seperate products for each test. Each was very expensive,( between $15 and $20,) and at the time I deemed it not worth it. Should I get one? If so is there a better less expensive option?
As for the stocking advice, I think you are correct that the Angelfish and/or the Severum are the culprits. For now I think I will stick with larger fish that are more compatible in my tank. el337, I was not planning on completing the schools, other than the neons, which I have decided against. I will get rid of the remaining neons. For the black skirt, I was told they are better in schools but not totally necessary. For the barbs, my LFS told me a school was 3+. Was the other schooling fish you were referring to the cory? Is this all correct info?

Thanks so much for all your help!
That's good that they use the liquid test. Could you get them to write down the exact numbers? You can get the entire kit on Amazon which would be cheaper.

All schooling fish do better in larger numbers including the black skirts which I hear get vey nippy if not in a larger group. And yes, Cory cats are a shoaling fish and would do best in group of at least 6.
 
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mmsboulder

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Awesome! I will check Amazon. Next time I have my water tested, I will ask for exact numbers. That's good information about the black skirts and cory cats. I will talk to my LFS about options.
Thanks again!
 
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