Neon tetras? At all hardy?

MikeRad89
  • #2
Probably one of the least hardy species of fish out there unfortunately.
 
Thunder_o_b
  • #3
It has been real hit or miss for us with neons. The school of 19 in a 29 gal has been fine for 6 months or so. It was a well established tank with very high water quality. Other times I just could not keep them alive.
 
MarkN1990
  • #4
They're highly sensitive fish. Only recommended in established tanks with good water quality


 
Anders247
  • #5
They do require good water quality. But another reason they are known as being sensitive is due to the fact that they require lower temps. They often are kept in high temps, and they have shorter lifespans because of that. Keep them under 75F.
 
AyStr8
  • #6
Just my personal experience . . .

I thought my tank was cycled and got 6. 3 died. I got 3 more and 1 died before even making it to my tank. I tried drip acclimation with them all, but in hindsight I think moving them to another container and keeping them there for an hour just added extra stress.

With 5 living and an uncycled tank, I added tss. All 5 survived. Once I was cycled, I got a new #6. I just floated him for 15 minutes and then added him to my tank. He's been fine.
 
CindiL
  • #7
Its probably hit and miss, maybe depending on the breeding. I got my first group a few months ago and they are all doing well.
 
mattgirl
  • #8
I started with 9. 4 from one store and 5 from another. That was all they each had. 2 of the ones in the group of 5 died by the next day. I lost one more from the group of 5 a couple of weeks later. Was easy to tell which ones came from each store because of the size of the fish. The 6 I have in there now all seem very healthy. Now that my tank is cycled I plan on getting at least 6 more and preferably from the first store when they get more in stock. I love these beautiful little guys.
 
chromedome52
  • #9
I have been thinking about the perceived sensitivity of Neons. I wonder if food isn't a part of the problem. Small fish = small mouth. Most pellets and flakes are difficult for them to eat due to size. They also need a fairly high protein diet. Lowering the temperature is also a factor in metabolism, so add a warm temperature, and they are starving to death. I've always fed live bbs to fish that size, or very finely ground shrimp/worm/plankton flakes.
 
Mcasella
  • #10
Hit and miss is a good one because they seem to go into shock very easily (then again most large pet store shippers don't focus on keeping them healthy just getting them there) the ones I first had came from two different stores with a total of seven, two died after moving the tank, two got eaten by a fish someone else put into the tank (wasn't there couldn't do anything about it), those introduced fish resulted in a complete tank die out (except for the golden mystery snail, who still lives in the tank). My current neons are great, they swim with my glo light tetras and seem to be very healthy. So I would suggest trying to find the healthiest ones you can in the tank you get them from and acclimating/quarantining them, to get rid of any diseases they might be carrying, before adding them to your tank. Good luck, most people find them to be iffy on surviving.
 
boshk
  • #11
I bought Cardinal tetra thinking they were slightly more resilient than Neons but it didn't work.
6 from one shop, 2 died next day
Another 8 which were bigger and more expensive from another....6 died.

Pretty sad, was my first lot of fish in new cycled tank.

The remaining 6 are good though now.

Sent from my LG-D802 using Fish Lore Aquarium Fish Forum mobile app
 
jpm995
  • #12
They are fussy about water conditions and are often in poor health when the store gets them. Make sure the store has them for at least a week before you buy then check the stores water ph and make sure its close to yours. They pefer ph on the low side [below neutral] but can adapt sometimes if its done slowly.
 
jpm995
  • #13
I have been thinking about the perceived sensitivity of Neons. I wonder if food isn't a part of the problem. Small fish = small mouth. Most pellets and flakes are difficult for them to eat due to size. They also need a fairly high protein diet. Lowering the temperature is also a factor in metabolism, so add a warm temperature, and they are starving to death. I've always fed live bbs to fish that size, or very finely ground shrimp/worm/plankton flakes.
I've never had an issue with neons or cardinals eating, they tear larger flakes apart easily. I did suppliment with live food because of other fish [elephant nose] and those little buggers could even tear apart tubifex worms and eat little pieces.
 
ClearEyes
  • #14
I've never had an issue with neons or cardinals eating, they tear larger flakes apart easily. I did suppliment with live food because of other fish [elephant nose] and those little buggers could even tear apart tubifex worms and eat little pieces.

My cardinals can gobble whole large flakes with no problem. With pellets, they take it into their mouth, nibble a bit, spit it back out, take it back into their mouth, nibble a bit, repeat. It's fun to watch another cardinal try and dart in and steal the pellet when one spits it out
 
DoubleDutch
  • #15
Think the biggest problem is neons are mostly tankbred in asia.
Just like DG's this kind of pressurebreedind in these amounts only brings us the worst (we like them to be cheap!). The (mis) use of meds makes them extremely vunerable for viral, bacterial and fungal infections.
A lot of the Cardinals are wildcaught or bred in South America and don't have this issue. Asia is upcoming though, so we've only to wait for disaster.
Both are midwaterfeeders :
So sinking granules aso are perfect for both.
 
Dylandrewlukesdad
  • #16
I think the real question you should ask is, how do you know your tank is done cycling? Have you tested the water? You should have 0 Ammonia, 0 Nitrite and some 20-40 PPM Nitrate. Danio's are some of the most hardy fish which is why they are used to facilitate the cycle, Neons as most have said are quite the opposite!

Test your water to be sure! Good Luck.
 
Andrewwl94
  • #17
I cycled my 55 gallon up with neon tetra, cherry barb and zebra danios they are surprisingly a hardy fish. I've never had problems with my neons? They've cycled two of my tanks with no problems and they are all still schooling and swimming around happily? So they are quite hardy in a way?

Sent from my E5823 using Fish Lore Aquarium Fish Forum mobile app
 
Peacefantasy
  • #18
Bhopkins1311 have you gotten a test kit yet?
I wouldnt add any fish until you know your tank is cycled.
 

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