Neolamprologus pulcher/ Daffodil Cichlid Care?

jkkgron2

Member
Hi everyone!

I’ve been looking into getting some Neolamprologus pulcher/daffodil cichlids and I’ve been seeing some mixed info on them. Hoping I’ll be able to figure out how many I can keep and what their specific care requirements are. If I were to get 14 of them for my 20 gallon long would that be overstocked? I’m sure my LFS would take any extras if they were to breed. If that’s overstocked then could I keep 2-6 in my 40g community tank? It’s very understocked and the only large fish in there is a pretty chill angelfish. Also, would they work in a tank with pretty hard water and a pH of 8.2? I’m guessing they will because they’re African cichlids but I want to make sure. Would $100 be a good price for 14 of them?

Thanks!
 

veggieshark

Member
14 is too many to start with and 20g is too small. I would start with 5 or so young near adults and let them pair off. One or two can get killed as they establish territories, etc. but once they start breeding and they will, low quantity will not be a problem.

If you mix with angels they will likely kill the angels, so I wouldn't plan on moving extra to a community tank. (Their water requirements are almost opposite anyway.) They will need and fill the entire tank whether it's be a 20 or 40g. They are pretty and not too large so I think you can find interested parties when they breed.
 
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jkkgron2

Member
veggieshark said:
14 is too many to start with and 20g is too small. I would start with 5 or so young near adults and let them pair off. One or two can get killed as they establish territories, etc. but once they start breeding and they will, low quantity will not be a problem.

If you mix with angels they will likely kill the angels, so I wouldn't plan on moving extra to a community tank. (Their water requirements are almost opposite anyway.) They will need and fill the entire tank whether it's be a 20 or 40g. They are pretty and not too large so I think you can find interested parties when they breed.
Sounds good. I’ll start with 5 young adults and let them pair off in my 20 long. Will I have to remove any once they pair off? I’ve been reading some mixed things about their environment. Should it have a bunch of caves, shells, or both?
 

veggieshark

Member
Once they assume their "family", they won't be too aggressive to each other. The more rocks, the better. Any structure that they can get in and out.
 

A201

Member
$100 isn't a bad price for 14 Daffodils.
They cost about $8 a piece in my area.
IMO, a larger group in the 40 gal. might be the way to go. Daffodils are schoolers & they grow fairly big, 4 inches, maybe a little more.
Eventually might consider upping to a 75 gal.
My LFS regularly has Daffodils in stock. They really color up upon maturity. Pretty fish.
 
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jkkgron2

Member
A201 said:
$100 isn't a bad price for 14 Daffodils.
They cost about $8 a piece in my area.
IMO, a larger group in the 40 gal. might be the way to go. Daffodils are schoolers & they grow fairly big, 4 inches, maybe a little more.
Eventually might consider upping to a 75 gal.
My LFS regularly has Daffodils in stock. They really color up upon maturity. Pretty fish.
Would a 20 gallon work? I can’t really upgrade right now. In the future I might be able to.
 

A201

Member
Sure, as long as the Daffodils are juveniles. As things progress, you'll know when to transfer the group to a bigger tank.
 
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jkkgron2

Member
A201 said:
Sure, as long as the Daffodils are juveniles. As things progress, you'll know when to transfer the group to a bigger tank.
Would they destroy plants? If not then I could move them to my 40 gallon and move my other fish to the 20 once they mature.
 

A201

Member
I think Daffodils, in the wild, are open water feeders, mostly eating tiny Inverts & plankton.
I don't know about them eating plants. I don't think they are particularly aggressive towards other species.
 
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jkkgron2

Member
A201 said:
I think Daffodils, in the wild, are open water feeders, mostly eating tiny Inverts & plankton.
I don't know about them eating plants. I don't think they are particularly aggressive towards other species.
Alright, I think I’ll start with the 20 gallon and then transfer them to the 40 once they grow some more. I should be able to transfer most of the plants into the 20 (along with the fish that were in the 40) once the daffodils need to be moved so that shouldn’t be a big worry.
 

chromedome52

Member
Juvenile Cichlids of many species act like schoolers, but adult Daffodils are certainly not schooling fish. These are rock dwellers, preferring to have a cave nearby to dart into if they feel threatened. They are essentially the same as Brichardi, both in behavior and requirements. They need a lot of rock structure. While small, recently mature fish will sometimes use shells, they are not classified as a shell dweller. IME, they can be quite aggressive toward other species once they start raising fry. Like the Brichardi, fry from multiple spawns will co-exist, and older fry will even act as guardians for the smaller ones. Some sources even consider the two to be the same species, as they will interbreed.

A long 20 is barely enough room to get a pair established. I would go with a minimum 36" tank, preferably a 40 breeder, but taller tanks will work as well if the rocks are piled high enough. These fish need a lot of space because of their family style of living.
 
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jkkgron2

Member
chromedome52 said:
Juvenile Cichlids of many species act like schoolers, but adult Daffodils are certainly not schooling fish. These are rock dwellers, preferring to have a cave nearby to dart into if they feel threatened. They are essentially the same as Brichardi, both in behavior and requirements. They need a lot of rock structure. While small, recently mature fish will sometimes use shells, they are not classified as a shell dweller. IME, they can be quite aggressive toward other species once they start raising fry. Like the Brichardi, fry from multiple spawns will co-exist, and older fry will even act as guardians for the smaller ones. Some sources even consider the two to be the same species, as they will interbreed.

A long 20 is barely enough room to get a pair established. I would go with a minimum 36" tank, preferably a 40 breeder, but taller tanks will work as well if the rocks are piled high enough. These fish need a lot of space because of their family style of living.
I plan on cramming as many caves and rock structures in the tank as possible to prevent aggression. It won’t be a permanent tank but right now I’m unable to move my fish out of my 40 breeder because I have a angelfish that can’t be in the 20. Would 5 work as long as I have 2 caves per fish? It won’t be permanent but they would be in there for 1-3 months.
 
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jkkgron2

Member
What about Neolamprologus caudopunctatus? I could get a group of 8 along with all caves and shells needed for a decent price. Would they work in a 20 gallon?
 

A201

Member
I've never kept Shellies, but they are often pictured on line in small setups.
As with the majority of setups, starting with juvenile fish allows one time to judge if & when an upgrade in tanks are needed.
 
  • Thread Starter

jkkgron2

Member
A201 said:
I've never kept Shellies, but they are often pictured on line in small setups.
As with the majority of setups, starting with juvenile fish allows one time to judge if & when an upgrade in tanks are needed.
I believe these guys are a mix of juveniles and adults. I’ll have a tank ready for them once they all mature and need more space. Thanks!
 
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jkkgron2

Member
I just went and got them! They’re all looking good and seem to be exploring the tank. I was a bit worried because I used 3% hydrogen peroxide to clean the tank earlier. However, I scrubbed the sides and bottom until it was dry, filled the tank with water and scrubbed again, and then I drained the tank before I started refilling it for the fish. So it Seems like I managed to get all the hydrogen peroxide out. They all have awesome colors and aren’t showing any signs of disease. Here are some pics!
 

A201

Member
Everything looks very good. I think the shell rubble scape will work out well.
Looks like the Cichlids are already coloring up.
 

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