Neocaridina Eggs Under Microscope

Sauceboat

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Hello! Today I had my first fish keeping casualty since the old goldfish I had as a five year old. One of my blue berried cherries died. She was imported and I had no airstone or filter in the tank (placed an order as soon as she died) and given the rest of my cherries are hanging out in the top of the tank, I figured hypoxia likely played a role in her death (definitely fixing that right now).

Regardless, she arrived berried a week ago which means there was a good chance that the eggs were near their hatch times, so after quickly setting up a makeshift egg tumbler to try and save any of her eggs, I took one of the eggs to my microscope (a $40 kids one that works better than my friend’s $600 high tech one somehow) to see if there were any signs of life or nearing hatching in the eggs.

I snapped some photos, they aren’t amazing since putting the phone camera into the microscope lens is not exactly the best way of taking microscope photos, but it gave me some questions.

1. In all the photos you can see a distinct darker zone and lighter zone, is the dark zone the body of the developing shrimp? Does the fact that there is very little of the light zone indicate it is near hatching time?

2. In photos 2 and 3 you can distinctly make out a figure protruding from the egg like a little finger. It didn’t come off when I moved the egg around so it is definitely attached, is this a parasite or something? Or perhaps an apendage of the baby shrimp? Any ideas?

3. I didn’t see anything moving around. When I usually look at things like daphnia and whatnot you can see a heartbeat among respiration and leg movement, I’ve never looked at eggs before but does the fact that I didn’t see a heartbeat or movement mean that the egg is dead?

4. If the egg is in fact not dead, how long would you estimate that it will be before the egg hatches? Is there any hope of these eggs surviving in the egg tumbler?

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-Mak-

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Really interesting! No idea what that appendage-like protrusion is.

Shrimp eggs develop two black dots when close to hatch, they're the eyes of the baby. Do you see something like this?

If fungal infection doesn't reach the eggs, and they were removed soon after mama died, I think you should have a chance here :)
 
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Sauceboat

Sauceboat

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-Mak- said:
Really interesting! No idea what that appendage-like protrusion is.

Shrimp eggs develop two black dots when close to hatch, they're the eyes of the baby. Do you see something like this?

If fungal infection doesn't reach the eggs, and they were removed soon after mama died, I think you should have a chance here :)
Awesome! I think I do see the spots when I look at them in plain light.
 
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Sauceboat

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AO1 said:
Off topic, but there wasn't a filter in the tank?
No there wasn’t. It was a planted walstad bowl style tank. It’s been set up for a few months but I think the issue was the plants weren’t producing enough oxygen to support both themselves and the shrimp due to low light. But given there are only 5 cherries in three gallons I haven’t seen any ammonia so I take it either their wastes are being immediately sucked up by the plants or there is enough nitrogen fixing bacteria in the substrate to fix up the light bioload of the shrimps.
 

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