Need Urgent Help In Identifying Disease

Voltaire

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Things in my 20 gal. have not been going well. The fish seem to be catching all types of diseases. The white fish has developed green spots all over its body as seen in the attached pics, and the Koi now has some sort of orange scales which seem abnormal. Would someone be kind enough to point out what and may be wrong, why that happened, and how to fix this?
 

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Fashooga

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What are the water parameters.

I’m wondering if they’re stressed due to the size of the tank. You don’t have a koi fish they look like comets to me, though I’m not completely sure.

But 20g is quite small and I’m think the quality and space is causing the problems.
 
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Voltaire

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Fashooga said:
What are the water parameters.

I’m wondering if they’re stressed due to the size of the tank. You don’t have a koi fish they look like comets to me, though I’m not completely sure.

But 20g is quite small and I’m think the quality and space is causing the problems.
You're probably right about them being comets. The tank isn't cycled yet.

So what do ya'll suggest I do? I have a larger 30 gallon but it has African Cichlids, and some of them are aggressive.
 

fjh

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What are your water parameters, temperature, and complete stocking? How long has this tank been running?

The "green spots" look like it may be the beginning of velvet. But he also appears to have some fin rot which is bacterial. Your "koi" just looks like hes mjssing some scales which is natural. If he develops red/brown spot that kinda look like bruising that may be ammonia burn.
 
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Voltaire

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Okay, so, just tested the water parameters. Temp: 79.9 Fahrenheit or 26.6 Celsius. Ammonia: 0 mg/l. Nitrate: around 15 mg/l (it looks a little pink irl). Nitrite: 1 mg/L. pH: 6.4. I wouldn't say the pH is accurate though: it always gives me 6.4 even in my other tank which is running perfectly. As for stocking, there are 7 fish total: 2 Gouramis, 1 Comet apparently, 2 white fish I'm not sure of, and 2 silver fish I'm also not sure of. Tank has been up for less than a month.
 

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Floundering_Around

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@Voltaire you need to immediately change your stocking. You have 2 tinfoil barbs (silver with the red tipped fins), 2 gouramis, and 2 possibly 3 goldfish. these fish are not compatible together.In the picture, the silver one looks like a fancy goldfish that has no dorsal fin, like a ranchu.
Both the tinfoil barbs and the goldfish get quite large, making that tank too small
 
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Voltaire

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They seem to be getting along just fine. Do you mean that they produce substances that are harmful to each other or something?
 

Goldiemom

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The fish don't have the same temperature requirements. The goldfish need cooler water, 65-72F. The others need warmer water, 74F+. They are different types of fish which do not live well together. The comets will eventually need a pond as they grow up to 18" long. Tropical fish and goldfish do not belong together ever. Many make this mistake and it never works out.
 

Rtessy

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The nitrite is far too high, do an immediate 50% water change and if you have prime, dose it in the tank. The red scales could be due to nitrite poisoning.
Everyone else, can we please focus on the disease at hand? Yes, the stocking is incredibly likely to be a factor in it, but we can't discuss the stocking of the fish if they all die.
 

Rtessy

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Also I'm not seeing fin rot, but I don't have the best eyes. Fin rot can be cleared up by daily water changes of 30-50% for a few weeks in most cases.
I do see red streaking on the fins, which also indicate ammonia and/or nitrite poisoning, so water changes can only help.
The first fish pictured definitely looks like a koi to me, I'm not sure about the other.... I haven't personally fought velvet so I'll let someone else give you medical recommendations, but you will need medicine for that.
 

Goldiemom

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Rtessy said:
The nitrite is far too high, do an immediate 50% water change and if you have prime, dose it in the tank. The red scales could be due to nitrite poisoning.
Everyone else, can we please focus on the disease at hand? Yes, the stocking is incredibly likely to be a factor in it, but we can't discuss the stocking of the fish if they all die.
I have to disagree with you here. The stocking can have a huge effect on the disease process and also needs to be addressed if we are to eliminate the problem. Could very well be why the nitrite is so high. I think in this case they go hand in hand. IMO

They could very well have parasites such has skin flukes too. The green spots lead me to that thought. Treating with methylene blue will help here.

Rtessy said:
Also I'm not seeing fin rot, but I don't have the best eyes. Fin rot can be cleared up by daily water changes of 30-50% for a few weeks in most cases.
I do see red streaking on the fins, which also indicate ammonia and/or nitrite poisoning, so water changes can only help.
The first fish pictured definitely looks like a koi to me, I'm not sure about the other.... I haven't personally fought velvet so I'll let someone else give you medical recommendations, but you will need medicine for that.
Koi's have whiskers.
 

Rtessy

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Goldiemom said:
I have to disagree with you here. The stocking can have a huge effect on the disease process and also needs to be addressed if we are to eliminate the problem. Could very well be why the nitrite is so high. I think in this case they go hand in hand. IMO
I'm in 100% agreement with you on this, as I said, it's pretty much guaranteed that the stocking played a role in the disease. That being said, the current potential diseases can still be treated for even if the tank is overstocked.
OP, if you want to return the goldfish, I say go for it. If you don't, you'll have to eventually find someone with a pond, but the choice is totally yours.
By eventually I mean in about a month.
 

Floundering_Around

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If you rehome anything, rehome that koi first. The picture is blurry but it looks like the fish does have barbels. All of those fish produce massive amounts of waste, rehoming the ones that definitely shouldn't be in a tank that size will make it easier to maintain lower ammonia and nitrites levels while the tank finishes cycling. In a tank that size, I would only keep the gouramis; then you can make it a tropical community tank.
I would continue to do daily water changes until your tank is cycled (no ammonia or nitrites, some nitrates). Methylene blue will be able to treat velvet, flukes, slime disease, white spot, and fungus.
 

DestinyStars

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Is the white fish a koi perhaps? Back when I had my butterfly KO I tank I had an ich outbreak and it ate my greyish blue koi's scales in a spot. When they grew back the scales were orange.
 

MichaelTant

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Voltaire said:
You're probably right about them being comets. The tank isn't cycled yet.

So what do ya'll suggest I do? I have a larger 30 gallon but it has African Cichlids, and some of them are aggressive.
Don't put them in the cichlid tank. They won't survive it.
 
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