Need To Know The Sex Of These Dolphin Cichlids

Discussion in 'Fish, Snail, Worm And Pest ID Help' started by saket, Apr 25, 2017.

  1. saket

    saket Valued Member Member

    20170425_105107.jpg 20170425_105141.jpg they are in a 40 gallon right now its cycled has 2 apple snails for present.
     
  2. Ed204

    Ed204 Well Known Member Member

    Hi there,
    I don't think your fish are Blue Dolphin cichlids (Cyrtocara moorii). I'm not too sure what species is this. @chromedome52 xan help you out.

    Judging by the ventral and anal fins of your fish, I would assume that the fish on the first picture is a female and the fish in the second picture is a male.
    For exact sexing you can try to vent them.
     
  3. Mihai Boldor

    Mihai Boldor Valued Member Member

    They definitely are not dolphin cichlids
     
  4. Ed204

    Ed204 Well Known Member Member

    Agreed. Dolphin cichlids don't have black ventral find and should have humps on their forehead
     
  5. OP
    OP
    saket

    saket Valued Member Member

    i could not guess the right species of them so when i searched them online they looked like dolphin cichlids so i thought they were those. thanx for clearing my doubts. now i want to know both the sex and species of these cichlids.
     
  6. MikeRad89

    MikeRad89 Well Known Member Member

    They look more like metriaclima. They're not dolphins, but the others who've posted are looking for adult moori characteristics in a juvenile fish.
     
  7. chromedome52

    chromedome52 Fishlore VIP Member

    They are not Metriaclima. They may be Chindongo socolofi. I'm uncertain about the first, as it looks more like an undetermined hybrid Mbuna, but it could simply be stressed (it has obviously been abused by tankmates). The second does look right for C. socolofi. Also known as the Pindani (common name).

    If the first is a female, you need more of them or she will end up dead. Mbuna are not pairing fish, and males tend to get very aggressive if there is only one female.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    saket

    saket Valued Member Member

    how stressed?
    they get along very well and no signs of aggression is there. what does it indicate?
    i still cant get the answer about the sex and species.
     
  9. chromedome52

    chromedome52 Fishlore VIP Member

    I gave you the most likely species, assuming they are not hybrids (which I never do on Mbuna that come with no names or wrong names). If it is C. socolofi, that species is notoriously difficult to sex, much like the Yellow Lab. As to sex, can't sex a beat up fish except possibly by venting. The fins on the first fish are ragged, and that comes from other fish biting it.
     




  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice