Need some advice on plants that require little light

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zebradaniofan

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The light I have is 32W. I usually only turn on the light to look at the fish tank. The living room, even with the shades down, is always decently lit in the day. I was planning to break off pieces of my fish tank cover near the back where there are holes for HOB filter streams(make the entire back lining of the cover open)

I have 2x HOB filters running and in the extra space I was thinking about possibly adding plants that would be suspended in the water in plastic pots with rubber bands or fishing line. I can make a rough sketch if you guys are having trouble understanding.

Are there plants that would survive given these conditions? I want the easiest plants to maintain where I wouldn't have to worry too much about CO2, extra nutrients, and lighting. There would also be no gravel.
 

Nutter

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The plants Sirdarksol has mentioned are excellent choices by the sound of it. The only thing I'm not sure of is if your intending to have the plants fully submersed or if you intend on having just the roots under the water & the rest of the plant growing out of the water over the top of the hood? That would make a massive difference to what plants you might be able to grow. If they are to stay fully submerged then I would go with Sirdarksol's recommendations but if they are not to be fully submersed a couple of those might not be suitable.
 
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zebradaniofan

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yes nutter i was hoping to just submerge the roots in the water and keep the leaves outside of the tank

do you guys kno of such plants which live in those conditions? thanks for the help
 

Nutter

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The following plants should do well with just the roots permanantly submerged. Most of the following plants are taken from a list in "The 101 Best Aquarium Plants" by Mary E. Sweeney. A handy little reference book if anyone is interested.

Aluminum Plant (Pilea Cadierei)
Arrowhead (Syngonium Podophyllum)
Bamboo Plant (Bamboo sp.)
Chameleon Plant (Houttuynia Cordata)
Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema Simplex)
Club Moss (Lycopodium sp.)
Coconut Plant (Calamus sp.)
Dwarf Rush (Acorus Pusillus)
Dragon Tongue (Demigraphis Repanda)
Dwarf Onion Plant (Zephyrathes Candida)
Elephant Ear (Caladium sp.)
Green Sandy (Dracaena Borquensis)
Japanese Rush (Acorus sp.)
Mondo Grass (Ophiopogon Japonica)
Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum Tasson)
Pineapple Plant (Dracaena Compacta)
Purple Waffle (Hemigraphis Exotica)
Red Dracaena (Cordyline sp.)
Rush (Pontederia Cordata)
Sandy (Dracaena Sanderiana)
Underwater Palm (Chamaedorea Elegans)

Some of the medium-large Sword varieties can be grown the same way but you need to give them time to adapt. Some of the Cryptocoryne species can be grown out of water to so long as the roots remain in the water.
 

Nate McFin

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Many of the plants, including those listed by Nutter, can be grown emersed. Including some Rotala, Hemianthus (baby tears) some Ludwigia, Stuargyne and many mosses. The thing is many of them will not do well without a VERY humid climate. There are hanger and terraces on the market as well as many other supplies. This website has some great articles on Ripariums. This will be a project for me down the road as well. It looks fun!
http://ripariumsupply.com/
 

sirdarksol

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One plant that's listed above that I disagree with is "bamboo plant (bamboo sp...)"
Bamboo grows so quickly that it would be useless in such a situation. It also needs a massive amount of light and nutrients. It would likely starve in an aquarium. On the other hand, lucky bamboo (which is actually a dracaena plant) does very well.
Another is Elephant Ear, solely because it would require an active hydroponics system to get water to the huge bulb.
 
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