Need Help, Beginner

clowy_5

New Member
Messages
11
Reaction score
2
Points
3
Hello now i am going to be completely honest, I have Never had experience with turtles , only freshwater fish whoch do absolutely great, but i adopted these guys because my relatives got them but had them living in Terrible conditions, water always super filthy, water level was always different, sometimes they couldnt even rest cause the slab is on bottom of tank and today when i saw them i just simply told them if i could take them, they Didnt even care they were lile Yes take them we dont have time, so i cleaned out this 10 gallon tank they had, washed all decor i plan to eventually get a filter and a turtle dock later this week, i did dechorinate the water, is there anything else i should know? And i know theyll grow so if they do well i will upgrade them to a bigger tank when i have the chance. I believe they are red eared slider turtles
20180519_191929.jpg
20180519_191941.jpg
 

Cheesearmada

Valued Member
Messages
482
Reaction score
227
Points
78
Experience
5 to 10 years
From previous knowledge, red eared sliders 'grow up to a foot' (females). A 10 gallon would not last them into adulthood. My LFS owner tells me they need a 120 gallon tank for fully grown females. Now this isn't the necessary amount of water you would need. For turtles it is preferably a larger living space (land + water)

I hope this hastily written bit gives you enough information
 

Floundering_Around

Well Known Member
Messages
848
Reaction score
341
Points
88
Experience
5 to 10 years
They need a dock so that their shell can dry out or it will rot. The dock (the blue thing) isn't high enough out of the water. The tank is also too small; turtles need ten gallons per inch of shell
 

midna

Well Known Member
Messages
2,683
Reaction score
2,411
Points
308
Experience
2 years
what the replies above said, basically. definitely get them something to climb up on and sunbathe on that's out of the water. they require a uv light for their shells and a bigger tank. kudos to you for rescuing them! also, they can outlive you. my mom's friend got a red ear slider when she was a kid and now she's 60 years old and still has the turtle in her backyard in a kiddie pool.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5

clowy_5

New Member
Messages
11
Reaction score
2
Points
3
midna said:
what the replies above said, basically. definitely get them something to climb up on and sunbathe on that's out of the water. they require a uv light for their shells and a bigger tank. kudos to you for rescuing them! also, they can outlive you. my mom's friend got a red ear slider when she was a kid and now she's 60 years old and still has the turtle in her backyard in a kiddie pool.
So the kiddie pool can be like a permanent home? As long as i keep up with the maintenance?
 

wodesorel

Well Known Member
Messages
903
Reaction score
683
Points
178
Experience
More than 10 years
Agree with the above posters, they have to be able to fully emerge to dry off when needed, and that area should have a specialty UVB light over it so that they can process calcium in their bodies properly. It doesn't have to be big. Getting their diet right is also important or they may grow up deformed, as is basking temperatures so they can warm up to digest without getting too hot or cold.

A kiddie pool would work, so long as the sides are higher than what the turtles can reach, or they will be out of there quick. Maintenance might also be tough on a low flat pool. These guys obviously will produce a lot of waste, but with a bare bottom and good filtration you may be able to avoid gravel vacuuming. Canister filters are heaven sent with aquatic reptiles!
 

Cheesearmada

Valued Member
Messages
482
Reaction score
227
Points
78
Experience
5 to 10 years
Also with two turtles, you may have to rehome one if they don't get along when they reach adulthood. One thing to look out for in the future.

Most importantly, have fun with your new turtles ! They are fun animals to keep
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom