Naturally Changing pH level?

TheCoolFish

Valued Member
Messages
123
Reaction score
0
Points
51
Experience
3 years
Hi I am cycle a new 50 gallon tank and I was wondering if there is a natural way to raise the pH. Or maybe home items???


 

Chunk101

Well Known Member
Messages
751
Reaction score
5
Points
53
Experience
1 year
I second Phishphin's suggestion.
I've used crushed coral and baking soda to increase the pH.
Although baking soda is cheap and handy, it is inherently more unstable than cc.
 

Phishphin

Well Known Member
Messages
609
Reaction score
7
Points
63
Experience
1 year
Stability of ph is often much more important than the "perfect" ph. Of course, if your fish require very basic water and your tap is very acidic... it may be a different story, imho. In addition to my question about why you are interested in raising the ph, what is your stock and what is your tap's ph?
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #6

TheCoolFish

Valued Member
Messages
123
Reaction score
0
Points
51
Experience
3 years
The pH of my tap water is around 8.2 so I'm looking to raise it to 7.4 and I have used cc but it doesn't seem to work.


 

Phishphin

Well Known Member
Messages
609
Reaction score
7
Points
63
Experience
1 year
Driftwood that will fit in your filter will probably not be large enough to alter the water chemistry. I just meant that peat moss (check out Fluval's product) could be added to some filters.

 

Archie1208

New Member
Messages
44
Reaction score
0
Points
41
Please correct me if I am wrong...however I am curious if you know your KH (Carbonate Hardness). If that value is high would he not have a difficult time maintaining any pH? I have the same problem with my pH. However I have too large a bio load to boot so that explains some of it. However I have a 2dh KH reading and just don't know if that is indeed low. I do think its borderline, but every week my pH has dropped from about 7.6 to anywhere from 6.6-7.0. My thoughts for this tank is to add a small amount of cc to my filter media. Does that sound right?


 

jetajockey

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,753
Reaction score
92
Points
293
Experience
More than 10 years
Adding an acid buffer may reduce the pH some, but the most effective route would be to use some distilled, r/o, or rainwater when doing water changes. Just a small percentage, but the % is something you'd have to figure out based on your test readings.
 

Marie1

Well Known Member
Messages
824
Reaction score
4
Points
53
Experience
More than 10 years
The pH of my tap water is around 8.2 so I'm looking to raise it to 7.4 and I have used cc but it doesn't seem to work.
Check it after it sits out overnight, or for 24 hours.

What is the PH of your tank? What kind of fish do you have? What are you wanting the PH to be?
 
Last edited:
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom