Nasty Green Algae Build Up

HarleyQuinn19

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I think I've finally figured out why my nitrates have been so off. I have the whole set up - filter, charcoal filter (should I ever rinse this in the removed tank water during a water change like I do my standard filter?), and a pump set up.

Every month or so, I honestly keep forgetting about it during water changes, it gets covered up with nasty green algae. It makes the water which should be clean more like a "clean oil spill". So, I have to dismantle the pump and tubes to pull it out and clean it, not breaking those pieces is major pita too. My standard filter is never extremely dirty. ****, it's usually not even dirty in appearance at all; I still clean it.

1) Can anyone tell me how to prevent the green algae from forming in the first place?

2) Should I shake out my charcoal filter as I do my rather one? Or leave it be? Does that one ever need changed?

OK that's more than my original question but I didn't want to do multiple posts at the same time.

Thanks in advance!
~ Harley
 

smee82

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Charcoal is not really needed on a day to day basis so id take it out and add other media.

What are your water parameters and how often are you changing your water.
Also what type of green algae are you talking about. Spot, dust, thread or hair.
 
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HarleyQuinn19

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smee82 said:
Charcoal is not really needed on a day to day basis so id take it out and add other media.

What are your water parameters and how often are you changing your water.
Also what type of green algae are you talking about. Spot, dust, thread or hair.
The charcoal came as part of the filter set with the tank, so I've just left it alone.

I change the water once/week. I just tested the water before I changed it Saturday and of course forgot to write everything down. Since I've fixed the algae issue I'm going to test it again and do a "full water" change tomorrow. I do remember everything was perfect except my nitrates. Those were really high and I can't find a way to bring it down. That's why i'm hoping removing the algae helped.

As for what it looks like, it's sort of a mix between thread and hair. It's definitely fuzzy and not nearly thin enough to be the others.
 

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Your high nitrates may very well be fueling the algae, so I'd start there.

High nitrates means you have excess nutrients in the water. This could be from inadequate water change, over feeding, leeching from fertilizer, or a heavy bioload in the tank or naturally from your source water. You are definitely on the right track already with water changes, however, you'll want to find out why the nitrates are high in the first place.

To first determine if your source water has nitrates in it, test it first with either your own test strips, or take it to a PetSmart (or any other LFS that does free testing) near you and have them test it. Nitrates will be in the water immediately, so you can test straight from the tap. You don't have to leave it sit to gas off as you would if you wanted to read an accurate pH.

If you do not mind me asking, it would help to know the following to give me a better picture of what your tank and situation is:
  1. What size is your tank?
  2. What is the stocking (# and type of fish) in your tank?
  3. How often do you feed, how much do you feed, how much are the fish able to finish?
  4. Is your tank planted?
  5. Are you using fertilizer for plants?
  6. What kind of light are you running and what length of time is it on throughout the day?
  7. Does the tank receive natural sun light as well?
  8. How often are you able/do you do water changes?

As for getting rid of the algae, remember algae takes time to develop. It can seem like it came over night, but it didn't. And that's alright. The point here is that it may take time to alleviate the algae issue, perhaps as much time as it took to grow. It is hard to get rid of 100% without ripping the tank apart and scrubbing everything. That takes time and it doesn't keep it from coming back if the issue behind the algae growth isn't solved.

There are three tricks I have used to get rid of this type of algae following manual removal (tooth brush, hose brush and planting forceps aka tweezers) and water change.
  1. Black out- this method involves covering the tank with a blanket to block out all light. The lights on the aquarium are turned off. The only time light gets in is when feeding the fish. Do this for a week should stunt the algae growth and weaken it. Sometimes the stringy slimy stuff will sort of disintegrate and disappear.
  2. Hydrogen peroxide- careful with use of this one. This method is fairly safe, but remember hydrogen peroxide is made to sterilize and burn cells. This means it can kill your fish in concentration by burning their gills. Two ways you can do this. Lower the water level in your tank during a water change. Before refilling, spray the exposed glass, plants decor with peroxide. Attach a spray nozzle or put the peroxide in a spray bottle. Make sure there is still 5 or more inches of water in the aquarium and do a light spray. Let it sit for 5 minutes and refill. You don't necessarily want to drop the water level more and risk exposing the fish to peroxide. Again it will burn their gills. The peroxide will dilute and break down in the water and become harmless to the fish as you refill. The second way to use peroxide is by spot treating with a 5mL pipet. Turn the filter off and leave the tank sit for 5-10min. You do not want any current in the tank. Draw hydrogen peroxide into the pipet and push it out over the areas effected by algae. I wouldn't do more than 20mL. In about 10 min algae will bubble and turn orange or grey/white. Do a water change after this.
  3. Glutaraldehyde- this is sold as a plant fertilizer as liquid CO2. (SeaChem Flourish Excel, Aquarium Co-op Easy Carbon). This is a carbon substitute in low tech planted aquariums (planted tanks without a CO2 system). In larger commercial concentrations it is sold as an algaecide. Dosing about 4x the recommended carbon supplementation helps knock algae back and the plants like it. At this dose it does not bother fish. Note that some plants are sensitive to glut and it will kill them. This method also takes time to work. Algae will start to dissipate in a couple weeks.
With any of the above methods, manual removal will help tremendously. But again, you want to find the source of the issue. Another tip, ABSOLUTELY DO NOT BUY ALGAE CONTROL. It is tempting to buy this product that claims to fix algae issues, but do not do it. There is a strong chance it will kill your fish. I've read reviews of people claiming it kills fish on multiple sources. I figured I had high enough flow and good oxygen exchange so I'd be find. Nope, despite running a sponge filter and two air stones I woke up to a tank of dead chili rasboras. I had a school of 20 and I lost all of them. I couldn't even save the handful that were gasping and flailing about at the bottom of the tank.
 
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HarleyQuinn19

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Celestialpearl said:
If you do not mind me asking, it would help to know the following to give me a better picture of what your tank and situation is:
  1. What size is your tank? 3 gallons
  2. What is the stocking (# and type of fish) in your tank? 1 male beta, 1 apple snail and 1 nerite snail (who won't seem to stop laying eggs on the sticks lol)
  3. How often do you feed, how much do you feed, how much are the fish able to finish? I feed him Tetra BettaMin small pellets. I feed him in the morning and then before I go to bed, so about 12hr apart. I used to feed him 3 pellets because my filter showed I was feeding him to often. Now I feed him 5 pellets and the filter is clean, probably because he inhales them and don't last long. .
  4. Is your tank planted? No living plants
  5. Are you using fertilizer for plants? n/a
  6. What kind of light are you running and what length of time is it on throughout the day? My tank has standard led lights for the day time, and I run that until bed time. It also has a blue led (not black light) for night time. I don't usually run the night time blue one though so he does not have any light at night.
  7. Does the tank receive natural sun light as well? It receives minimal indirect natural sun light.
  8. How often are you able/do you do water changes? I've been doing water changes once a week. He hates me for days afterward. lol
 
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HarleyQuinn19

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A few more questions for y'all.

How often should I syphon my tank?
My poor Panda's tail is not the way it should be. It almost looks shredded. I think it's from the high nitrates. Should I use some of the stuff I can buy specifically for tail problems like this? Or is that a bad idea?
If I use that will it interact with the chemicals I'm already using?
 

lojack

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HarleyQuinn19 said:
A few more questions for y'all.

How often should I syphon my tank?
My poor Panda's tail is not the way it should be. It almost looks shredded. I think it's from the high nitrates. Should I use some of the stuff I can buy specifically for tail problems like this? Or is that a bad idea?
If I use that will it interact with the chemicals I'm already using?
If you have clean water (lower nitrates) it should help with the fin rot.



Edit: I saw that the fish was a betta and not a panda corydoras, removed the comments that didn't apply.
 

AsleepInYorkshire

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Hi,

May I make a suggestion please? I'm assuming your nitrates are high. This suggests that you don't have a full cycle in your filter. I'm coming to the conclusion that many believe that having nitrates in their fish tank is actually something they don't have any control over. I kept fish 30 years ago and have recently returned to the hobby after a (very very very) long illness. And that return was inspired by my 12 year old daughter who asked for an aquarium for Christmas. And there was absolutely no way I was going to allow her to take on chores of changing the water to keep nitrates down. I did a lot of research and came up with a plan. And the long and short of it is there are no nitrates in my daughters tank. And when I tell you that we have 10ppm in our tap water and the filter media reduces that then I'd hope that's got your attention.

Over thirty years of illness I learned one thing. Never, never, never give in. Never. And I am like a ferret with lockjaw :rolleyes: . I'm not bothered how many times I get something wrong. I do it again, and again, and again, and again, and again until I get it right. We've had some set backs with my daughters aquarium, not least of which was Neon Tetra Disease and an algal bloom. So I'm not Mr. Perfect by any stretch of the imagination.

Here's her aquarium last week.

P1020273.JPG

It's a 70usg cube. There's a Fluval FX4 filter housing just short of 3kg's of Biohome Ultimate below the tank. It's not a cheap solution and may be not something you can afford. However, there's nothing stopping you looking for a preowned filter and it doesn't have to be an FX4. I bought the FX4 for her as it empties the tank without a syphon. The tank is refilled direct from an inline connection to the downstairs toilet. So all she does is turn a few little valves and hey presto - water change.

It's what's in the filter that reduces the nitrates in our tap water. Biohome Ultimate. In the UK it costs about £15/kg + some postage. It cost £57 to fill the FX4 on my daughters tank. That will last well over ten years. I'd suggest that's very cheap then. The media is a sintered glass.

I mentioned we had an algal bloom. Unbeknown to me the phosphates in our tap water fluctuate quite a lot. When we first tested them when we got the tank they were 0.1ppm. At some point since they rose to over 1.8ppm (our test kit won't go any higher). Somewhere during that increase we added a second Plant light and boom we had to sort that one out. So algae is also created by phosphate levels over, I believe, 2-3ppm and light. We have not yet installed our next project which is to remove the phosphates from the tank. We have, though, reduced the time we have the lights on and no algae has returned.

Can I leave you with another photograph. I mentioned above that one way of getting better equipment is to buy pre-owned. When I eventually worked out that we had Neon Tetra Disease in my daughters tank I accepted culpability and purchased a pre-owned aquarium to use as a quarantine tank. It cost £200.00. We had to travel 3hrs to get it and clean it up and add some plants (which we took out of her main aquarium). I think the point I am making is preowned doesn't mean it's no good. It's a 20usg tank an is in our lounge.

And I'm from Yorkshire and we love to make our money go that little bit further :joyful:


20200327_234503.jpg

AiYn'U
 
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HarleyQuinn19

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Sorry for the confusion. Panda is the name of my beta fish. To that end, will the stuff to help with fin rot, he's healthy otherwise, actually work or is it a waste or will it poison my poor fish? I'm definitely NOT looking to kill him.
 

lojack

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HarleyQuinn19 said:
Sorry for the confusion. Panda is the name of my beta fish. To that end, will the stuff to help with fin rot, he's healthy otherwise, actually work or is it a waste or will it poison my poor fish? I'm definitely NOT looking to kill him.
Sorry, I saw that after the fact and updated my last comment lol.

Clean water (good parameters) will often allow the fish to heal on their own. Some hobbyists will recommend meds, my preference is not to use them. Even if the fins stop deteriorating, they might not grow back the damaged parts.

HarleyQuinn19 said:
A few more questions for y'all.

How often should I syphon my tank?
Personally I would just suck up the poops you see daily. It'll keep them from adding to the nitrates and you won't have to change water as frequently (unless your water tests show otherwise).

AsleepInYorkshire said:
Hi,

May I make a suggestion please? I'm assuming your nitrates are high. This suggests that you don't have a full cycle in your filter. I'm coming to the conclusion that many believe that having nitrates in their fish tank is actually something they don't have any control over. I kept fish 30 years ago and have recently returned to the hobby after a (very very very) long illness. And that return was inspired by my 12 year old daughter who asked for an aquarium for Christmas. And there was absolutely no way I was going to allow her to take on chores of changing the water to keep nitrates down. I did a lot of research and came up with a plan. And the long and short of it is there are no nitrates in my daughters tank. And when I tell you that we have 10ppm in our tap water and the filter media reduces that then I'd hope that's got your attention.

Over thirty years of illness I learned one thing. Never, never, never give in. Never. And I am like a ferret with lockjaw :rolleyes: . I'm not bothered how many times I get something wrong. I do it again, and again, and again, and again, and again until I get it right. We've had some set backs with my daughters aquarium, not least of which was Neon Tetra Disease and an algal bloom. So I'm not Mr. Perfect by any stretch of the imagination.

Here's her aquarium last week.

P1020273.JPG

It's a 70usg cube. There's a Fluval FX4 filter housing just short of 3kg's of Biohome Ultimate below the tank. It's not a cheap solution and may be not something you can afford. However, there's nothing stopping you looking for a preowned filter and it doesn't have to be an FX4. I bought the FX4 for her as it empties the tank without a syphon. The tank is refilled direct from an inline connection to the downstairs toilet. So all she does is turn a few little valves and hey presto - water change.

It's what's in the filter that reduces the nitrates in our tap water. Biohome Ultimate. In the UK it costs about £15/kg + some postage. It cost £57 to fill the FX4 on my daughters tank. That will last well over ten years. I'd suggest that's very cheap then. The media is a sintered glass.

I mentioned we had an algal bloom. Unbeknown to me the phosphates in our tap water fluctuate quite a lot. When we first tested them when we got the tank they were 0.1ppm. At some point since they rose to over 1.8ppm (our test kit won't go any higher). Somewhere during that increase we added a second Plant light and boom we had to sort that one out. So algae is also created by phosphate levels over, I believe, 2-3ppm and light. We have not yet installed our next project which is to remove the phosphates from the tank. We have, though, reduced the time we have the lights on and no algae has returned.

Can I leave you with another photograph. I mentioned above that one way of getting better equipment is to buy pre-owned. When I eventually worked out that we had Neon Tetra Disease in my daughters tank I accepted culpability and purchased a pre-owned aquarium to use as a quarantine tank. It cost £200.00. We had to travel 3hrs to get it and clean it up and add some plants (which we took out of her main aquarium). I think the point I am making is preowned doesn't mean it's no good. It's a 20usg tank an is in our lounge.

And I'm from Yorkshire and we love to make our money go that little bit further :joyful:


20200327_234503.jpg

AiYn'U
That's a beautiful planted tank and it's great to get the kids involved.

I won't bother to discuss whether or not biohome or matrix makes a difference but I offer another possible explanation to your 0 nitrates. Perhaps your plants are using them up? A lot of hobbyists with densely planted tanks have to dose fertilizers because the nutrients, nitrates included, are used up so fast.
 
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HarleyQuinn19

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AsleepInYorkshire while I would love to be able to do all of that; I simply can't.

1) My tank is only 3 gallons.
2) I am living with my parents and they have said a 3 gallon tank is the limit.
3) Used (with I'm totally cool with btw) or not, I do not have the budget for anything you described. ****, I didn't understand most of what you said.

As for the light, are y'all talking light period, like even from the light from his tank? Or sunlight?

Also, the area that gets covered in algae it's exposed to any light or at the very most it gets very, very minimal exposure. The part it grows on is under a cover, which came with the tank to hide the filters etc for whatever reason. If I haven't been clear (my fault, none of yours), the algae is not in the tank itself. At all. It grows on the final "filter" before it's pumped back into the tank. Nowhere else. Ever. Only on that one spot.

I'll take pictures later, if I can, it's really dark down there and show you the filter system and where it grows. Hopefully that will clear up (hahaha) any confusion my descriptions etc may have caused.
 
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HarleyQuinn19

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lojack I don't have any living plants in my tank. The only living things are Panda (the beta fish), Shi Fu (yellow apple snail) and Tigress (the striped nerite snail). Yes there is a Kung Fu Panda theme to my tank. My sons and I tend to do that. They have a huge (to me) tank and we named every single fish, except the shrimp, after a character in the Harry Potter series. lol

Panda looked like he was doing kung fu, against his reflection, when I first put him in the tank. So kung fu lead to Panda and *bam* we had our theme. lol
 

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HarleyQuinn19 said:
lojack I don't have any living plants in my tank. The only living things are Panda (the beta fish), Shi Fu (yellow apple snail) and Tigress (the striped nerite snail). Yes there is a Kung Fu Panda theme to my tank. My sons and I tend to do that. They have a huge (to me) tank and we named every single fish, except the shrimp, after a character in the Harry Potter series. lol

Panda looked like he was doing kung fu, against his reflection, when I first put him in the tank. So kung fu lead to Panda and *bam* we had our theme. lol
At least your kids come up with creative names! Mine kids come up with names like "zoomer," "fast zoomer," "orangey," "fast orangey," etc etc etc.:confused:
 

lojack

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HarleyQuinn19 said:
AsleepInYorkshire As for the light, are y'all talking light period, like even from the light from his tank? Or sunlight?

Also, the area that gets covered in algae it's exposed to any light or at the very most it gets very, very minimal exposure. The part it grows on is under a cover, which came with the tank to hide the filters etc for whatever reason. If I haven't been clear (my fault, none of yours), the algae is not in the tank itself. At all. It grows on the final "filter" before it's pumped back into the tank. Nowhere else. Ever. Only on that one spot.

I'll take pictures later, if I can, it's really dark down there and show you the filter system and where it grows. Hopefully that will clear up (hahaha) any confusion my descriptions etc may have caused.
Typically it could include lighting from either a fixture or actual sunlight. My tank is in a brightly lit room that gets direct sunlight in the afternoon. I've accepted that part of the tank will always need a little elbow grease to keep pretty, lol.

The algae might be growing there because it's getting just enough moisture and lighting to thrive... I'm not 100% positive as I'm a more visual person and pictures always help me. I had a tank that always grew algae on the underside of the lid where the filter output would splash some water occasionally.
 

AsleepInYorkshire

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lojack said:
I won't bother to discuss whether or not biohome or matrix makes a difference but I offer another possible explanation to your 0 nitrates. Perhaps your plants are using them up? A lot of hobbyists with densely planted tanks have to dose fertilizers because the nutrients, nitrates included, are used up so fast.
Thank you. We've got a lot more to do to it. Currently we have two very large pieces of bogwood soaking in Mum & Dad's bathroom :rolleyes:. One is about one metre long the other about half. One is for my daughters "other" tank and the other for the one you have seen. Now the other tank does sound like ... well ... yes I'll say ... a tank too far. However, C19 has denied our daughter three holidays this year, one being a trip to Disney and Universal in Florida. I hasten to add she hasn't said one negative word about that. She has taken it in her stride and toughed it out. At the same time as this became apparent they closed the UK down. We were still dealing with NTD at this point. Now I understand that we need to ensure our offspring are tough enough to face the world but at 12 I thought she'd shown enough resolve. And I ordered the second tank. She want's to make a home for a Betta. And this will be her project. She will manage it. Her first tank is about 70usg. The second about 60usg. She knows that she will be limited with what fish can be in the same tank as the betta and she knows it will need lots of places to "skulk".

Anyway I digress. I could talk for hours about my daughter :joyful:.

Yes. I think this is a good point. And without a doubt the plants will use up any nitrates the media doesn't. I'm reasonably sure the filter is actually the largest consumer though. Before we used the Biohome we had a standard media in the FX4 which came with it. We added more. When the Biohome arrived we added it downstream from the other media. We measured the nitrate levels at this time and they were between 5-10ppm. Four days later I tested the water. No nitrates. I had used a Tetra strip. I assumed the strip was no good. I left it and tested again the next day. Same result. So the next day we tested with a higher grade kit. And that showed about 1ppm. We have also had the exact same results in the quarantine tank. With one exception. The quarantine tank wasn't heavily planted when we added the Biohome. Effectively our tap water has acted like a dummy bioload and provided sustenance for additional anaerobic bacteria.

Your other point about fertilisers is also very interesting. My daughter added fertliser daily to the tank when we first planted it. And we set the Co2 probably slightly too high. The plants turned into a forest in about six weeks. And this ties in very well with your earlier comment I think. As they have grown they have clearly moped up nitrates in large quantities. And I feel this underlines my approach to everything we do in the tank. In the UK we call it "belt and braces". Come to think of it I'm sure you call it that in the US so just ignore that bit :shame:. We recently acquired some Tetra Complete and used plant pots for each plant. There are also two Fluval Plant 3 LED's. Once we bring the phosphate levels under our control we will turn up the Co2 again and turn the lights on for longer again.

Then six weeks later we will have to cut the tops of them. They will make good cuttings for her new tank.

I've had a long day working at home ;) and am going to have a small glass of something distilled :;bananabeer.

AiYn'U
 

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HarleyQuinn19 said:
AsleepInYorkshire
Also, the area that gets covered in algae it's exposed to any light or at the very most it gets very, very minimal exposure. The part it grows on is under a cover, which came with the tank to hide the filters etc for whatever reason. If I haven't been clear (my fault, none of yours), the algae is not in the tank itself. At all. It grows on the final "filter" before it's pumped back into the tank. Nowhere else. Ever. Only on that one spot.
OOoohh.... I thought your tank was being over run with algae. That's why I asked all the questions.

My best guess for that is it is moist and there are a lot of nutrients (nitrates, food bits, etc) in that part of the filter that encourage growth. It won't take much light for it to grow if it has the nutrient source. I get algae on my return on all my tanks. It just grows in a thick fuzzy layer. I leave it. It will eat up extra nitrates. I do wipe it away occasionally when it starts to clog up the return nozzle or when I get tired of looking at it. So as long as it isn't spreading in your tank no harm no foul.

As for Panda, fresh clean water goes a long way. 3 gallons is not a lot of water. With your decor and gravel you may have less than 3 gallons of water in there. Less than ideal water quality can cause frayed fins. In this case high nitrates. The thing that is tough about small volume tanks is that the parameters can change really fast. Try changing a gallon of water every two days to see if that helps. You don't have to siphon vac the tank, just a quick change. This will help dilute the water and keep nitrate levels down. A friendly tip, save your milk jugs and juice jugs. You can use them to keep hold water ahead of time. Since you only need to change a small volume of water, these would be awesome (and easy) to use to store and change your water with.

The effect of nitrates can still be detrimental to fish health just as ammonia. Think of nitrates as a by product of some type of organic waste being in the water and decaying. For example if it were our drinking water that had high nitrates that came from a reservoir, it would indicate some type of pollution in the water source. Not great for our health. Or it could be from ground contamination from a busted pipe requiring us to boil the water to ensure it is sterile enough to consume. It is the same for fish. High nitrates can stress their immune system. This leads to illness, infection, delayed healing time which we may see expressed as pale/abnormal coloration, lethargy, labored breathing, sores, torn fins, etc. High nitrate will not immediately kill a fish (or person), but after being exposed for some time can definitely start to show effects on their health. Generally speaking, a nitrate level of 0-40 ppm is considered safe for fish. The lower the better.
 
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HarleyQuinn19

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So since the high nitrates, best guess, are fraying his fins should I use the BetaFix I bought? It says it works for bacterial infections, which from what I can tell, he doesn't have. So should I just save it like a "first aid kit" piece, just in case? lol

I need to change his water today but I'm worried because he's built a bubble nest, which I know beta's do but he only does it when he's really stressed. (Yes, I actually know my fish that well. lol) Will one more day of nitrates, since I just changed his water Sunday, cause more harm? Or will the stress cause more harm? (Does that make sense? lol)

Oh what is most likely wrong if the water has like an "oil slick" appearance? Like it's the sort of rainbow color and I can watch it move on the water in the filter area.

I'm sorry for a million and one questions in one post. The info and tips y'all give are just bringing up more I didn't think to ask.
 

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Decor can also fray fins if he is gets behind something stiff and has to force himself out. But even then, higher nitrate levels can decrease healing and encourage illness etc.

I want to reiterate I’m not saying your water is filthy. Some nitrates are normal. 0-40 is normal, though most people try to keep them below 20ppm. I emphasize nitrates being a contributing issue because your water volume is small which can encourage a rapid increase in nitrates in a short amount of time.

I think changing the water more throughout the week is the best choice. Because it will help you reduce the nitrate level and when done consistently will help keep the water clean and stable.

Waiting a day shouldn’t hurt, but you will want to find a method or routine that best fits your tank to keep the nitrates stable and lower.

You say he bubble nests when stressed. I’m a little confused by this myself because I’ve only known my bettas to bubble nest when things where stable and they were feeling ok. Water changes seemed to actually encourage them to build a nest, repair it or make it larger.

The oil slick is most likely a very thin protein layer. This can occur from organics in the water, oils from food, and oils from our skin from maintenance. Slower current that small filters put out, which is what Bettas appreciate, tends to encourage this unsightly build up. Two things help alleviate this: 1) point the output nozzle, if you have one, toward the water surface to get rippling. The surface agitation usually keeps the protein layer at bay. 2) Drape a paper across the surface and draw it up to one side to skim the layer off. If you cannot adjust the filter output in any way this method is useful to reduce the protein layer.
 
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This past wc was a lot for him. I syphoned the tank and the water that came from it was a horrible nasty brown. I rearranged the decorations etc so I could syphon the whole tank. And then had to fiddle with it again when I realized the algae was back. Oh and his leaf had become really gross on its own so I had to replace it.

Basically a whole lotta change for my little guy. Once he discovered his leaf had *poof* returned he stopped building the bubble nest and switched to chilling on his leaf. Now all is right with his little world, until tomorrow's wc. Poor guy. lol

Celestialpearl and all of you really have been such a huge help. Thank you all so much.

*hugs to all*
Be safe!
 

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