20 Gallon Tank Mystery snail,shell Issues?

Is this normal or an issue

  • Issue

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  • Normal

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    2

Galactica555

Member
I have 3 Mystery snails in my 20 long guppy fry grow out tank. Bare bottom with a mix of live and fake plants. I noticed on of their shells is peeling,cracked?? And the other has a brown streak now? I don't think it's the same issue but I'm not sure what's up? Is it a calcium issue for the peeling one(brown snail), and is the second one a bruise or is that poo(yellow one)?
 

Zach72202

Member
If you can see right through the shell and looks super thin you may need more minerals in the water for their shell. Do you know if you have hard or soft water?
 
  • Thread Starter

Galactica555

Member
Zach72202 said:
If you can see right through the shell and looks super thin you may need more minerals in the water for their shell. Do you know if you have hard or soft water?
Do I tell that by the ph?
 

mimo91088

Member
Calcium issue for sure. Make sure you keep the hardness up and feed some food with calcium. I personally use hikari crab cuisine.
 
  • Thread Starter

Galactica555

Member
mimo91088 said:
Calcium issue for sure. Make sure you keep the hardness up and feed some food with calcium. I personally use hikari crab cuisine.
Thanks! The people at the shop told me just to put this rock in there and it would be fine - Is it possibly a species pron thing? I have nerites and ramshorns that never had this issue,should I feed them some too?(just in case) and is it ok for Cory's if they get at it?
 

Zach72202

Member
Galactica555 said:
Do I tell that by the ph?
Not necessarily. Hard water and high pH generally go together, same with soft water and low pH, but not always.

Hard water and soft water are general terms for something called GH or general hardness. You can test this with a GH test kit. GH is basically minerals like calcium, potassium, and other electrolytes. By this, hard water would mean a high GH, and soft water would be a low GH. Things like livebearers and snails like hard hard water, where neon tetras and discus like soft water. They can adapt to different conditions, but just remember stability is key with any fish. If you want to raise GH you can use wondershells, cuttlebone, or crushed coral.

When your GH is low, the mystery snail's shell will actually dissolve into the water, therefore becoming thinner and weaker. When the GH is high the snail's shell will get thicker over time. It takes time for this to happen, it isn't instant.

On the other hand what relates to pH is KH, or carbonate hardness. This is a buffer in the water which protects pH from dropping or raising. A low KH means if you added some acid, like tannins, into the water your pH can drop, but if you add some type of base into the water with a low KH, your pH can rise. To raise KH you can add a teaspoon of baking soda, its perfectly safe.

To test for these you can get a KH and GH test kit for like 15 dollars. You can probably take a water sample to the local fish store and they will probably test it for you to let you know.
 
  • Thread Starter

Galactica555

Member
Zach72202 said:
Not necessarily. Hard water and high pH generally go together, same with soft water and low pH, but not always.

Hard water and soft water are general terms for something called GH or general hardness. You can test this with a GH test kit. GH is basically minerals like calcium, potassium, and other electrolytes. By this, hard water would mean a high GH, and soft water would be a low GH. Things like livebearers and snails like hard hard water, where neon tetras and discus like soft water. They can adapt to different conditions, but just remember stability is key with any fish. If you want to raise GH you can use wondershells, cuttlebone, or crushed coral.

When your GH is low, the mystery snail's shell will actually dissolve into the water, therefore becoming thinner and weaker. When the GH is high the snail's shell will get thicker over time. It takes time for this to happen, it isn't instant.

On the other hand what relates to pH is KH, or carbonate hardness. This is a buffer in the water which protects pH from dropping or raising. A low KH means if you added some acid, like tannins, into the water your pH can drop, but if you add some type of base into the water with a low KH, your pH can rise. To raise KH you can add a teaspoon of baking soda, its perfectly safe.

To test for these you can get a KH and GH test kit for like 15 dollars. You can probably take a water sample to the local fish store and they will probably test it for you to let you know.
Wow!Thank you for such a detailed response,I'll check into getting that kit. I do have a ph reader and it's around 6.4-7. Is that too low?
 

mimo91088

Member
Galactica555 said:
Wow!Thank you for such a detailed response,I'll check into getting that kit. I do have a ph reader and it's around 6.4-7. Is that too low?
Yea. Acidic water will eat at the shell. You want to stay above 7. Try adding some crushed coral to your HOB. Your guppies will appreciate the harder water too.
 

Debbie1986

Member
I had to remove my Mopani wood from my 38 gallon as it was causing really bad shell defects on my mystery snails. it's i a bucket drying out. oh well.

I tried crushed coral, wondershell, and even ph balance additives just weren't doing it. Then I realized & i had changed the drift wood out early last spring.

my mystery snails in other tanks did not have the issue, so even with soft southern water, it was my wood causing excessive shell damage.

So far, no new damage is seen. it may be a bit to see over all recovery. The fish were fine, no odd PH swings. just the snail shells were horrible for mystery and ramshorn in the tank.
 
  • Thread Starter

Galactica555

Member
UPDATE: not sure what it was called,but some folks at the pet store gave me a pound of this white rock stuff?(forgot its name) not coral? Like a coral something mix. Said they will chew on it and turn it into calcium,been a few days now. Can see minimal improvement
 

Debbie1986

Member
That's wonderful news!!
 

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