Mystery Snail Mystery

Mazeus

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I've got one, I call him Methuselah, that lives in my shrimp tank. he's the size of a quarter (for the North Americans), or 10 pence piece (for the Brits). I want to see how big I can get him.
 

Dch48

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I've got one, I call him Methuselah, that lives in my shrimp tank. he's the size of a quarter (for the North Americans), or 10 pence piece (for the Brits). I want to see how big I can get him.
That's huge for a Ramshorn. when I had some many years ago, they never got bigger than a dime. Of course, if you only have one, he gets all the food.
 

Mazeus

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That's huge for a Ramshorn. when I had some many years ago, they never got bigger than a dime. Of course, if you only have one, he gets all the food.
Yep, he's the king of the tank. I also keep the tank cooler (72F) and I think that helps. I have ramshorns in all my other tanks (that are kept at about 77-78F) and he is at least 3 times the size of the others, so I wonder whether temperature is a factor.
 

Dch48

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I'd have no issue with my really tiny ramshorns except they started eating my anubias plant. =[
They do munch on plants when there is not enough algae for them. Malaysian Trumpet snails may be a better choice. They don't reproduce as fast and help keep the substrate clean and aerated. They also don't leave egg clutches all over the place. Their young are born alive under the substrate.
 

allllien

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I'd have no issue with my really tiny ramshorns except they started eating my anubias plant. =[
They'd only be eating dead parts, they cant eat anubias it's too tough for them. They can eat some of the more fragile plants though, but most plants are safe with them.
 

allllien

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They do munch on plants when there is not enough algae for them. Malaysian Trumpet snails may be a better choice. They don't reproduce as fast and help keep the substrate clean and aerated. They also don't leave egg clutches all over the place. Their young are born alive under the substrate.
They reproduce twice as fast lol, seeing as they pop out live young, but they can be another choice if you like them -personally I find them too small and to me they might as well be pest snails, but each to their own
 

Dch48

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They reproduce twice as fast lol, seeing as they pop out live young, but they can be another choice if you like them -personally I find them too small and to me they might as well be pest snails, but each to their own
MTS only have a few babies at a time, not 20-50 eggs hatching all at once. I think all things considered, MTS are more beneficial than Ramshorns but more drab looking. MTS seem to be good for shrimp tanks because their waste is actually beneficial to the shrimp who eat it.
 

allllien

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MTS only have a few babies at a time, not 20-50 eggs hatching all at once. I think all things considered, MTS are more beneficial than Ramshorns but more drab looking. MTS seem to be good for shrimp tanks because their waste is actually beneficial to the shrimp who eat it.
I definitely notice a lot more eggs than eventual snails, so either only the strongest survive or a lot of babies get eaten by bigger snails? shrimp? (or fish if they're in the same tank). But as I mentioned it depends a lot on the particular lot of ramshorns (some do get out of control, but it's not the norm). I haven't kept MTS before, but I'm going on what I see in shops -where they usually form part of the substrate in the tanks they're in, while ramshorns are usually few and far in comparison.
 

allllien

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I've got one, I call him Methuselah, that lives in my shrimp tank. he's the size of a quarter (for the North Americans), or 10 pence piece (for the Brits). I want to see how big I can get him.
Haha I think that's fun part It's always cool to see one grow really big because it's not always they do.
 

allllien

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Hey, I think I might have an answer for you! I recently had my own 'snail mystery' with ramshorn snails. In all the years I've kept them, I've never seen ANYTHING affect them besides meds, but I started up a new 'ramshorn snail tank' as a project to try and breed interesting colors, and about a month later all the snails were acting drunk / intoxicated / or looked dead (laying on their side, unable to 'stand' and I found a couple dead too). I couldn't work out what could possibly be going on -they looked a bit better after water changes, but then the next day they were back to looking like they were dying.. I figured maybe it was some disease as they were all new snails from all different sources (most had poor quality shells), but I've never even heard of ramshorns getting sick, let alone seen anything like this -then I started noticing some white poop in the tank, probably from a white chalky type rock I had in their tank. It's the only thing I can think of as it was added fairly recently -it's a small white rock, possibly texas holey rock or something similar -so, do you have any rocks in your snail tank?
The only things I had in my tank was an old resin ornament, filter and this white rock (nothing wrong with the water and I even started giving them water out of a healthy tank that also has snails in it), so it could only be this rock. No idea how or why it affects them, but somehow it was killing them.
I'd suggest if you have any type of natural rock in your tank, try removing it, doing a large water change and go from there.
In my healthy snail tank, I have yellow colored natural rock and also the red/orange chalky type rock, and that doesn't affect them at all (most rock shouldn't), but it seems there might be some types that just don't agree with snails.
 
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