Mystery offspring 0_o

Discussion in 'Breeding Fish' started by Bijou88, Aug 8, 2015.

  1. Bijou88Well Known MemberMember

    While cleaning my main tank today I noticed an odd platy fry amidst the others....it appears to be a gold twinbar....
    I have sunset, red wag and blue platies. Most of my babies are red wags with some sunsets occasionally, but I just got my first litter of blue babes.

    Now I'm no genetics expert, but how did THAT happen??

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  2. Bijou88Well Known MemberMember

    Excuse the terrible quality, i had to zoom way in with my phone. Doesn't this appear to be a twinbar?

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  3. kidster9700Well Known MemberMember

    That's definitely a twin bar... WEIRD


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  4. Bijou88Well Known MemberMember

    I thought so, lol. Weird little alien fry....I'm guessing one of my blue ladies got busy with a twinbar before I got her and this one little girl got dad's genes, haha.

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  5. kidster9700Well Known MemberMember

    Twin bars are pretty so hey, you got a free twin bar!


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  6. chromedome52Fishlore VIPMember

    Twin Bar is one of the genes required to produce Wag, so I would guess that it originated from that fish. Wag was originally produced by accident in the mid-20th century by someone trying to move the twinbar gene into Swordtails. Turned out that Swords have a modifier gene by default, which turned the twin bars into the Wag tail pattern. He wisely bred this back into the maculatus as well as breeding it into the swordtails. Most Platy strains probably lack the modifier gene, and because it is a dominant, the wag may be heterozygous for the modifier (only carrying one such gene in the pair), Crossing the heterozygous wag with a normal type platy, such as Gold, could easily produce a Gold Twinbar. The gold color would indicate that the red color of the wag is also heterozygous, as red is also a dominant gene.

    Essentially, it shows that your Platies are a potpourri of genotypes, and you are unlikely to get a single phenotype from any of your females.
     
  7. kidster9700Well Known MemberMember

    That's really cool! I did not know about the twin bar/wag relationship. I have a female red wag and a female gold twin bar, so I would never have noticed if my wag produced a twin bar.
    Do you know anything about bumblebee/panda colorations? What do those come from? Since bumble bee is the head and panda is the tail, they must be different


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  8. Bijou88Well Known MemberMember

    Well all of my females are wags, so that would make sense. Interesting...

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