My Small Fish Are Dying

Heron

Member
How long has the tank been cycled? . How high are your nitrates? Is there any sign of the gouramI bullying the smaller fish? Is the tank big enough for all the fish in it? Were there any obvious signs on the dead fish as to what killed them? , Any bloating, swimming in weird ways, sticky out scales or unusual behavior before they died.
 
  • Thread Starter

~Matt~

Member
The tanks has been cycled for 6 months now. 0 nitrates. There was no sign of gouramI bullying whatsoever (I’ve had the gourami, the cories, and the pleco for about 4 months and the mollies for 2 weeks) The tank is large enough. It’s 45 gallons. There was no unusual behavior before they died either. They all are fine 2 days ago, then they stopped eating, and then the next day a majority of them were dead.
 

Zka17

Member
It is almost impossible to have 0 nitrates... unless you have something special to remove nitrates. It could be something wrong with your testing method...

Depending on where did you get your mollies, they could have been sick already. Also, am I missing the number of the mollies? A sudden increase of the fishes, may have caused an ammonia spike - which in turn acted on the stressed mollies.

Unfortunately, you may have introduced some disease into your aquarium, so keep one eye on the other fish. Keep up with the water changes, and keep measuring the ammonia, nitrites and nitrates.
 

Heron

Member
If you have only had the mollies for 2 weeks it may be that they came with some form of disease that has infected the cories too. You say your nitrates are 0. This seems strange to me because as the last stage of the nitrogen cycle is nitrates and even with regular water changes one would expect some nitrates. No nitrates suggests an uncycled tank but if that were the case you would have ammonia and/or nitrites present, this has me confused. As many fish have been affected I would suggest there is something wrong in your water so I'd recommend regular large water changes to correct water problems.
 
  • Thread Starter

~Matt~

Member
Zka17 said:
It is almost impossible to have 0 nitrates... unless you have something special to remove nitrates. It could be something wrong with your testing method...

Depending on where did you get your mollies, they could have been sick already. Also, am I missing the number of the mollies? A sudden increase of the fishes, may have caused an ammonia spike - which in turn acted on the stressed mollies.

Unfortunately, you may have introduced some disease into your aquarium, so keep one eye on the other fish. Keep up with the water changes, and keep measuring the ammonia, nitrites and nitrates.
I introduced 8 mollies into the tank at once, that was probably what killed them wasn’t it? If so, are my other fish in danger of dying as well? Is there medication I give them?
 

Guanchy

Member
what are you using to test your water? if you have 0 nitrates you might not have a cycled tank.
 

Zka17

Member
  • Thread Starter

~Matt~

Member
Guanchy said:
what are you using to test your water? if you have 0 nitrates you might not have a cycled tank.
No that I look at it, the nitrates are probably about 5

~Matt~ said:
No that I look at it, the nitrates are probably about 5
Am I the only one that has done this? I feel so stupid for doing that. I know that you shouldn’t put that many fish in once, I guess I just forgot
 

MicG

Member
No, if you have carefully examined all your situations, the only thing left is the true.
The molly has parasites or they were sick before entering your tank.
I accidentally introduced a sick Cory into my tank, and one molly and two tetra got sick slowly, all my other tetra and molly, including baby molly fish are fine.
This kind of thing is totally random, so there is no need to regret what you have done mistakenly.
Just fix it with the appropriate medication.
You can observe and take clear pictures to ask for help.
Good luck.
 

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