My planted tank is out of control!

Eyybaby

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I need some help with my planted tank! it's getting wild

I started a planted tank with no fish just plants but things are taking a dark turn. After 2 months I now have 50 snails. Thousands of what I think are copepods. That's not all the problems are getting worse I now have a bunch of greenflies on the surface and worms, Weird worms with like a shell on their top half
Whats going wrong? All i do is just dose the tank with ferts for the plants and have CO2.
 

Asomeone

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Nothings wrong you just need to add something to offset all this explosion of growth.
1. Clean your tank. If you have so many snails theyre overtaking, scrape them off and attempt to control.
2. If you have drangonfly nyhphs or anything of the sort in the water that needs to be addressed immediately. Removal of them is the first course of action and then prevention in the second. The easiest method of prevention is a close eye on the tank to ensure you remove nymphs when they are introduced. I would suggest adding some type of fish to allow you to reduce the amount of co2 being introduced and also allowing the plants a bit more nutrients naturally.
3. If you have that many pods...They are easily siphoned out, at least the younger stages are, if you have a lot of the adult stages then normal water changes siphoning the substrate should help. That being said, pods wont harm your tank as they are scavengers and most fish find them as a good food source.
Edit: if its got a shell its likely a snail
 

AngryRainbow

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If there's no fish, couldn't you increase the CO2 temporarily and poison all the unwelcome inhabitants?

I have no experience with CO2 but I know at a certain dosage level it proves deadly to fish, so I'd assume the same would be true for any animal.
 

MayaBetta

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Most likely pond snails, common hitchhikers from store plants and reproduce hermaphroditically. Do you have a picture of the snails? Honestly they could be the source of your problem being that snails produce waste. If they are pond snails, a lot of people just euthanize them since they are a pest, or you could introduce an Assassin snail if the water is safe.
 
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Eyybaby

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Update they're actually tiny greenfly / midges larvae. But I think it's time I euthanized the entire tank. What kills Copepods, tiny flies and fly larvae and pound snails without harming the plants?
Thanks
 

altwitch

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Assasin snails or a loach or two should do the trick, but then you have to allow for their requirements for life. I also routinely convert stowaways on my plants into food source for the main tank. Mild irritant but not a true issue, just requires a few minutes a day to address.
 

SM1199

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Pea puffer, perhaps? I've heard most will eventually wipe out a whole tank of pond/bladder snails and will also eat other non-shelled things like you describe.
 

MayaBetta

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Copper will get the snails. And if your tank is made of glass, you can pour boiling water in to kill the flies.

MayaBetta said:
Copper will get the snails. And if your tank is made of glass, you can pour boiling water in to kill the flies.
Wait don’t do the boiling water. That will kill the plants.

What kind of plants do you have?

So you can add hydrogen peroxide 3% to kill all of them and it shouldn’t harm your plants if you dilute it properly. If you’re worried about your plants, take them out of the tank, dump in the hydrogen peroxide, and dunk the plants (make sure the roots don’t touch the H202). As long as the roots don’t touch it there is little to no chance of the plant being killed by it. If you choose the dipping route, make sure you have glasses of conditioned water to keep the plants in while the peroxide is in the tank. After everything you want is dead, just rinse the tank with water and add conditioner. You might need to dip the plants in the solution a couple times to make sure the pests are killed. You can wrap a wet paper towel around the roots and leave them to soak upside down in some H202.
Personally, I would also add some copper to the water to make sure all the snails are killed. The copper will not harm the plants.
 

angelcraze

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AngryRainbow said:
If there's no fish, couldn't you increase the CO2 temporarily and poison all the unwelcome inhabitants?

I have no experience with CO2 but I know at a certain dosage level it proves deadly to fish, so I'd assume the same would be true for any animal.
This?

I'm not sure either, but I know ppl gas out unwanted critters in vivariums.
 
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