My new nerites!

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Red_Rose

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Yesterday I had bought two Spiny(or Horned) nerites. I normally get Zebra nerites but they didn't have any but there were tons of Spinies to be bought.

This is the first time I've had this type of snail. Below is a picture of what one of them looks like. They both look the same except one is a wee bit smaller.

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The advantage to this snail compared to the Zebra is that they are very light in weight. Zebras have very heavy shells so sometimes they lose their grip on plant leaves and fall off onto their backs and need a bit of help to right themselves.

If anyone would like a bit of info on the snails I mentioned, check out this link and scroll down to the section that's titled "Freshwater Nerites".
 

funkman262

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Never seen that one before. Nice find
 
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Red_Rose

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Thank you.

A few years ago, I saw a picture of that kind of snail on a betta forum. I tried looking for that and Olives but the only ones I could find around here at the time were Zebras until as of late.
 

Elodea

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Oh, I have these snails too! They're my favorite species of nerite.

Yep, I love the way how they can climb on even them most delicate plants such as Anacharis to munch off the algae. And those cool-looking spines really make them unique.

Horned nerites are the smallest species of nerite snail, normally growing up to 0.75 inches max, although it is possible to have larger specimens. They are also a different species from olive, zebra, and tracked nerites (all variants of one species): Clithona corona.
 
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Red_Rose

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Elodea said:
Oh, I have these snails too! They're my favorite species of nerite.

Yep, I love the way how they can climb on even them most delicate plants such as Anacharis to munch off the algae. And those cool-looking spines really make them unique.

Horned nerites are the smallest species of nerite snail, normally growing up to 0.75 inches max, although it is possible to have larger specimens. They are also a different species from olive, zebra, and tracked nerites (all variants of one species): Clithona corona.
I've only had these little ones for a day but I'm already quite fond of them. When I picked them up, I could feel the difference in weight compared to my Zebra. My Zebra, who is over two years old, doesn't let her heavy shell stop her from climbing up onto Crypt leaves to clean them up.

If these guys only stay small then I might get another one for the tank because I don't know if two would be enough to keep a 20 gallon free of algae. I'd get one for my betta's tank to go along with my Zebra but I know my betta would hurt his mouth or face on the spikes.
 

jerilovesfrogs

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cute! i just got one like that in the mail. gotta love it when usps delivers snails! mine is a corona....black stripes, goldish yellow body with horns. i don't have a pic yet, he just came today. but he is tiny compared to the tracked and zebras.

i do have him with my DT betta.....i have heard sometimes the spikes are a deterrent to keep the betta away, and play nice with mr. snail. we'll see!

you should get more, i might too!
 

Elodea

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I would get more Coronas, except most at my LFS are deceased, empty shells.

My two nerites were the last survivors.

If they have lots of algae to eat (like in my tank) they grow FAST! Mine are already reaching max size and I've only had them for 4 months! I got them at about 0.3 inches long, baby size.
 
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