My guppy breeding thread*

Ethan30

Member
This is where this operation will be centralized. * is for some issues may get their own threads. Before we start based on what I said in other threads about the cloudyness and fish count etc, could you let me know their or here if I am ready to begin?



This is where disscutions will go now.

Here is the in general I am getting from you guys

1. Large DIY tanks are a good idea
2. Pleco NEEDS to go
3. 10 g works but is not ideal for breeding

Anything else I should know before start breeding
 

H Farnsworth

Member
Nope. You got it there. Change your water.
 

Whitewolf

Member
The only thing you need to know that is a right/wrong way to do it is, guppies must have clean water. Substrate that harbors left over rotting food, dead decaying fish, fish feces, is no good and they will get sick. That's why a lot of serious breeders use bare bottom tanks or ponds. Guppies thrive in clean, low nitrate water. Live floating plants like anacharis, hornwort, or najas "guppy" grass, or water sprite, can hide fry and absorb nitrates. Other than that you should have at all times 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, and below 20 nitrates. Lakes in nature have 0,0,0 Plants absorb nitrates, and anerobic bacteria eat aerobic bacteria. The only way to get that in your fish aquarium is to change the water. A lot, I do it every other day. (with a tube, I suck up feces from my bare bottom tanks, and do this every other day on 18 tanks)

The other stuff you have questions about, that is a matter of preference. No set way of doing things, its all a matter of preference. But you have to have 0,0,>20 and clean tanks that don't have lots of rotting **** in the gravel. The more decaying stuff at the bottom and nasty smelly gravel or sand, the more your guppies will get sick.... aI'm for clean tanks and 0 0 0
 
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Ethan30

Member
Whitewolf said:
The only thing you need to know that is a right/wrong way to do it is, guppies must have clean water. Substrate that harbors left over rotting food, dead decaying fish, fish feces, is no good and they will get sick. That's why a lot of serious breeders use bare bottom tanks or ponds. Guppies thrive in clean, low nitrate water. Live floating plants like anacharis, hornwort, or najas "guppy" grass, or water sprite, can hide fry and absorb nitrates. Other than that you should have at all times 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, and below 20 nitrates. Lakes in nature have 0,0,0 Plants absorb nitrates, and anerobic bacteria eat aerobic bacteria. The only way to get that in your fish aquarium is to change the water. A lot, I do it every other day. (with a tube, I suck up feces from my bare bottom tanks, and do this every other day on 18 tanks)

The other stuff you have questions about, that is a matter of preference. No set way of doing things, its all a matter of preference. But you have to have 0,0,>20 and clean tanks that don't have lots of rotting **** in the gravel. The more decaying stuff at the bottom and nasty smelly gravel or sand, the more your guppies will get sick.... aI'm for clean tanks and 0 0 0
I was thinking of using containers I use for other stuff for like this:

51F580AF-2B53-49C0-88F9-FCD33A5904B8.jpeg
 

Sorg67

Member
How do you vacuum gravel without vacuuming fry?
 

FinalFins

Member
This is what I was th
Ethan30 said:
1. Large DIY tanks are a good idea
2. Pleco NEEDS to go
3. 10 g works but is not ideal for breeding

Anything else I should know before start breeding
Well large tanks are generally a good idea.

Pleco does need to go for sure.

10g will work as a growout tank. After they hit 3/4 of a inch to 1 inch, back in the tank you go.

So before you start, first please please get a 25+ gallon, preferably a 29 gallon to start this out.

Sorg67 said:
How do you vacuum gravel without vacuuming fry?
Work around them. Or put a sponge on the end of the vacuum so no fry are sucked in.
 
  • Thread Starter

Ethan30

Member
FinalFins said:
This is what I was th


Well large tanks are generally a good idea.

Pleco does need to go for sure.

10g will work as a growout tank. After they hit 3/4 of a inch to 1 inch, back in the tank you go.

So before you start, first please please get a 25+ gallon, preferably a 29 gallon to start this out.
FinalFins said:
Work around them. Or put a sponge on the end of the vacuum so no fry are sucked in.
I would not use gravel. I could use a vacuum in the corner and make sure fish stay away.

Ethan30 said:
I would not use gravel. I could use a vacuum in the corner and make sure fish stay away.
Sorg67 said:
How do you vacuum gravel without vacuuming fry?
Oops forgot to quote you in
 

Whitewolf

Member
I suck into a 5 gallon bucket. Run a pump to my python tube that runs into the shower bathroom drain. Its a sump pump sold at a LFS cost me $30. It has a 1" tine adaptor and it has a cover with mesh so no fry get sucked yp. After a water change I unplug the pump some water stays in my bucket and ill catch fry with a brine shrimp net and out them back in the fry tanks.
 
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Ethan30

Member
Whitewolf said:
I suck into a 5 gallon bucket. Run a pump to my python tube that runs into the shower bathroom drain. Its a sump pump sold at a LFS cost me $30. It has a 1" tine adaptor and it has a cover with mesh so no fry get sucked yp. After a water change I unplug the pump some water stays in my bucket and ill catch fry with a brine shrimp net and out them back in the fry tanks.
ok
 

Momgoose56

Member
Ethan30 said:
This is where this operation will be centralized. * is for some issues may get their own threads. Before we start based on what I said in other threads about the cloudyness and fish count etc, could you let me know their or here if I am ready to begin?



This is where disscutions will go now.

Here is the in general I am getting from you guys

1. Large DIY tanks are a good idea
2. Pleco NEEDS to go
3. 10 g works but is not ideal for breeding

Anything else I should know before start breeding
You need appropriate sized heaters in all those tubs. Guppys are tropical fish. Fry will die if the water is too cold. You'll need to place the heaters so they aren't touching the sides or bottom of the plastic containers. They can get hot enough to melt plastic. The suction cups on heaters may or may not stick to plastic. You'll also need airstones if you don't have filters. Water needs to move for oxygen, CO2 and other gasses to be exchanged adequately for fish in water. Sponge filters would be better. You'll need a good Master test kit that tests at minimum, pH, ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Fry are very sensitive to water conditions (ammonia, nitrites and nitrates) and you'll need to keep those at 0ppm. If you get sponge filters for the bins ahead of time and cycle them first, you'll save yourself lots of time and water.
Before you start breeding guppys for money, check your market for them. Call some local fish stores and see if they will buy guppies from you and how much they'll pay for them. Typically fish stores mark up livestock 100 to 300%. Which means if you see a guppy for sale at a fish store for $1.00, The store probably paid 25 to 50 cents for it. Good luck with your endeavor! I hope you can sell lots of guppys.
 
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Ethan30

Member
Momgoose56 said:
You need appropriate sized heaters in all those tubs. Guppys are tropical fish. Fry will die if the water is too cold. You'll need to place the heaters so they aren't touching the sides or bottom of the plastic containers. They can get hot enough to melt plastic. The suction cups on heaters may or may not stick to plastic. You'll also need airstones if you don't have filters. Water needs to move for oxygen, CO2 and other gasses to be exchanged adequately for fish in water. Sponge filters would be better. You'll need a good Master test kit that tests at minimum, pH, ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Fry are very sensitive to water conditions (ammonia, nitrites and nitrates) and you'll need to keep those at 0ppm. If you get sponge filters for the bins ahead of time and cycle them first, you'll save yourself lots of time and water.
Before you start breeding guppys for money, check your market for them. Call some local fish stores and see if they will buy guppies from you and how much they'll pay for them. Typically fish stores mark up livestock 100 to 300%. Which means if you see a guppy for sale at a fish store for $1.00, The store probably paid 25 to 50 cents for it. Good luck with your endeavor! I hope you can sell lots of guppys.
Thanks, ok I will consider this

I will be busy so might not see a lot of posts. May not even see the replies to this. Wanted to say thanks to everyone who is helping.



Would this work?

I was thinking of killing 2 birds with 1 stone by making the pleco the cleaner fish in the 3 mouth old area, the largest so he won't eat them, if I bred 2 guppies how large would their area with the pleco need to be? Would it work at all?

On an unrelated note, sorry to push this again but if you haven't could fill out this survey? It makes this process more simple for me. (unless me writing this would be self promotion so in that case forget it)

Is it ok to breed guppies in a 10 gallon tank - Guppy 428332

If you are seeing this and don't care to fill it our let me know that's fine.
 

FinalFins

Member
Plecos are not cleaner fish and should never be considered cleaner fish. But if the 3 month old area is a tank of 25+ gallon then sure, but plecos need dedicated feeding and create a lot of waste.
 
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Ethan30

Member
FinalFins said:
Plecos are not cleaner fish and should never be considered cleaner fish. But if the 3 month old area is a tank of 25+ gallon then sure, but plecos need dedicated feeding and create a lot of waste.
I agree, I wasn't saying I wouldnt feed it, I was just saying it also might help cleaning. Not to say I do less, but more a backup if I forget or somthing.
 

FinalFins

Member
TBH, Plecos will create more waste than they will clean. Its like usung a puppy to clean up table scraps. More of a backup for what? If you have a pleco, usually you want to start doing 2x weekly water changes.

What is the tank size of the 3 month old tank?
 
  • Thread Starter

Ethan30

Member
FinalFins said:
TBH, Plecos will create more waste than they will clean. Its like usung a puppy to clean up table scraps. More of a backup for what? If you have a pleco, usually you want to start doing 2x weekly water changes.

What is the tank size of the 3 month old tank?
Oh ok, good to know, where do I put him until the new tanks are ready and water is cycled? Current tank is 10 gallons. Upgraded tank I don't have yet.
 

Momgoose56

Member
Ethan30 said:
Oh ok, good to know, where do I put him until the new tanks are ready and water is cycled? Current tank is 10 gallons. Upgraded tank I don't have yet.
You only have a 2.5 and a 10 gallon tank right? There IS no other place for you to put him.
 
  • Thread Starter

Ethan30

Member
Momgoose56 said:
You only have a 2.5 and a 10 gallon tank right? There IS no other place for you to put him.
I was saying I would make a DIY tank for the guppies and put him in too
 

Gone

Member
Ethan30 said:
Here is the in general I am getting from you guys

1. Large DIY tanks are a good idea
2. Pleco NEEDS to go
3. 10 g works but is not ideal for breeding

Anything else I should know before start breeding
The pleco might need to go, but numbers 1 and 3 are completely wrong.

If you're serious about breeding guppies, you need lots and lots of tanks. If you look at the fish rooms of any top guppy breeder, by far the most common size is 10G's. Sometimes 5's are used for breeders, but most commonly guppies are bred in 10's.

Unless you're completely flying by the seat of your pants and have no plan for controlling the population, you need to separate the male and female fry at about 1 month of age. You have to keep each drop separate, and keep the males and females separate. How many tanks per line depends on how many drops you're going to take from your breeding stock. Each drop requires two tanks. Personally, I take two drops from each set of breeders, which means I need four tanks reserved for at least six months in order to separate the males and females and grow out to sell or show. The breeders need to be discarded in some way, because there's simply not room for any more fry.

If you're setting up large tanks for guppy breeding, you're going to be throwing lots of different lines and different ages together, and it will be impossible to selectively breed. In all cases, unless you have an outlet for hundreds of guppies every month, you'll rely on overcrowding to control the population.
 
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Ethan30

Member
GuppyDazzle said:
The pleco might need to go, but numbers 1 and 3 are completely wrong.

If you're serious about breeding guppies, you need lots and lots of tanks. If you look at the fish rooms of any top guppy breeder, by far the most common size is 10G's. Sometimes 5's are used for breeders, but most commonly guppies are bred in 10's.

Unless you're completely flying by the seat of your pants and have no plan for controlling the population, you need to separate the male and female fry at about 1 month of age. You have to keep each drop separate, and keep the males and females separate. How many tanks per line depends on how many drops you're going to take from your breeding stock. Each drop requires two tanks. Personally, I take two drops from each set of breeders, which means I need four tanks reserved for at least six months in order to separate the males and females and grow out to sell or show. The breeders need to be discarded in some way, because there's simply not room for any more fry.

If you're setting up large tanks for guppy breeding, you're going to be throwing lots of different lines and different ages together, and it will be impossible to selectively breed. In all cases, unless you have an outlet for hundreds of guppies every month, you'll rely on overcrowding to control the population.
Ok thanks
Babie Guppy died by mistake today, RIP, He/She got stuck on the grate when I took it out. :( :( . 1 of my 2 fry.
I am also going to get 2 new females for the 10 gallon. I am going to see how to find a new hone for the pleco tonight.

Update, I have removed the grate to prevent this from happening again
 

Demeter

Member
It happens, I’ve killed quite a few fry by accident with nets or while doing water changes. It’s hard not to with so many tiny fish swimming around.
 
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Ethan30

Member
Demeter said:
It happens, I’ve killed quite a few fry by accident with nets or while doing water changes. It’s hard not to with so many tiny fish swimming around.
I am getting new ones since 1 female mom died so I feel a bit better, now I want to get the other one to a breeder ASAP so He/She can pass on the mother’s genes. It was her first batch so only 2 fish.
 

emeraldking

Member
What happened?

I'd call it an unfortunate accident. For this can happen more often then you might think. Even if you're thinking that you're sufficiently careful.
 
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Ethan30

Member
emeraldking said:
I'd call it an unfortunate accident. For this can happen more often then you might think. Even if you're thinking that you're sufficiently careful.
The reason they died was I was overprotective and left in the area to protect from adults in case it sunk into the water while I was sleeping or something, so I had to remove it during feeding time.
 

emeraldking

Member
Ethan30 said:
The reason they died was I was overprotective and left in the area to protect from adults in case it sunk into the water while I was sleeping or something, so I had to remove it during feeding time.
Well, it's a learning process...
 
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Ethan30

Member
Ethan30 said:
Babie Guppy died by mistake today, RIP, He/She got stuck on the grate when I took it out. :( :( . 1 of my 2 fry.
I am also going to get 2 new females for the 10 gallon. I am going to see how to find a new hone for the pleco tonight.

Update, I have removed the grate to prevent this from happening again
Ok guess these got merged. Ok sorry, I have reasons why I did if am allowed to mention. Sorry about this happening. Coradee and Mike any advice to know when and when not to make new threads?

emeraldking said:
Well, it's a learning process...
Also
Do you think the other would be ok in 2.5 gallon tank on its own
 
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Coradee

Moderator
Member
Ethan30 said:
Ok guess these got merged. Coradee and Mike any advice to know when and when not to make new threads?
HI Ethan as I said in the notification message, it gets very confusing when you ask the same question in multiple threads, members can help you better if they have all the information in one place rather than having to jump from thread to thread.
 
  • Thread Starter

Ethan30

Member
Coradee said:
HI Ethan as I said in the notification message, it gets very confusing when you ask the same question in multiple threads, members can help you better if they have all the information in one place rather than having to jump from thread to thread.
Ok then, I did say the * meant some things get special threads, but I will change that if need be. Thank you for helping me so a stricter mod dosent ban me.
 

FinalFins

Member
Ethan30 said:
Also

Do you think the other would be ok in 2.5 gallon tank on its own
What would be ok? Fry?

Permanatly, no. Temporarily for maybe 1-2 days, sure.
 
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Ethan30

Member
FinalFins said:
Permanatly, no. Temporarily for maybe 1-2 days, sure.
1 fish?
 

FinalFins

Member
FinalFins said:
Permanatly, no. Temporarily for maybe 1-2 days, sure.
 

Sorg67

Member
FinalFins said:
Permanatly, no. Temporarily for maybe 1-2 days, sure.
Ethan30 said:
FinalFins would it be accurate to say that one adult guppy could survive in a 2.5 gallon tank for a while, but it would be stressful and damaging to health? The longer, the more stressful and damaging to health. So the length of time you are willing to leave an adult guppy in a 2.5 gallon tank is a function of the stress and damage to health your are willing to inflict. The more stress and health harm, the greater risk of disease and possible stunting growth.

Fry could be okay in a 2.5 gallon tank for a bit longer?
 

FinalFins

Member
Nope. Fry are even more fragile than adults and should be kept in pristine water, nitrates low and ammonia/nitrite zero.

Fry also excrete (is that the word?) a hormone (or pheromone??)into the water that inhibits other fry growth. But it also affects itself. So in a small tank that hormone/pheromone whatever it is becomes more concentrated.
 

Sorg67

Member
FinalFins said:
Nope. Fry are even more fragile than adults and should be kept in pristine water, nitrates low and ammonia/nitrite zero.

Fry also excrete (is that the word?) a hormone (or pheromone??)into the water that inhibits other fry growth. But it also affects itself. So in a small tank that hormone/pheromone whatever it is becomes more concentrated.
So the constraint is water quality more than swimming space?

What would be the smallest tank you would keep fry in?

Fry have a greater bio-load than there size would suggest?
 

FinalFins

Member
Both.
 
  • Thread Starter

Ethan30

Member
Sorg67 said:
So the constraint is water quality more than swimming space?

What would be the smallest tank you would keep fry in?

Fry have a greater bio-load than there size would suggest?
FinalFins said:
I thought since 3 could work in a 10 then 1 could work in a 2.5. I have heard they are great in 5 gallons but ok. What size do you reccomend for the tank? I am giving the fry to family and they want a small tank.
 

FinalFins

Member
Minimum for Male guppies is a 10. Minimum for female guppies is 20 IMO.
 
  • Thread Starter

Ethan30

Member
FinalFins said:
Minimum for Male guppies is a 10. Minimum for female guppies is 20 IMO.
Wow good to know your opinion that is surprising.
 

John58ford

Member
I don't know how large of a "breeding operation" you are planning to build, I run a very small one, for endlers not fancy common guppy. My 3 favorite females and less than month old fry live together in a smallish 4 gallon with a huge surface area, it's the bottom half, of a half of a 20 long. My males all live together in one community tank with other fish, and my female non breeders live in a separate tank. If I can't sex the fry at the month-ish mark, I grow them out as needed in a Non guppy inhabited tank until I can figure out where to put them. I have to keep them moving out they crowd the female breeders and less fry drop per cycle. My tanks are all networked together for very consistent water parameters but I have to be super careful with qt when I introduce other fish into one of the community type tanks in the network.

As far a clean goes, my breeding area is marble to golf ball size rocks in a single layer bare bottomed otherwise. Lightly planted with crypts. I find the highest fry survival rate with a little bit of mulm under the rocks, but not a solid layer by any means. If I look through the bottom I can see though but it's dusted. These rocks let the fry free swim and such all on their own. As far as cleaning... For that tank I have a special 3/8" siphon hose with a drinking straw as the bell. Nothing gets sucked in I don't want sucked in

If you are going large scale, I have seen people use a row of totes, connected in series with over flows (PVC to keep them modular, or drilled over flows for permanent sets). With a larger tank (20 gal long out similar) on each end making a closed loop using a single pond/fountain pump. This keeps them in small 3-5 gallon groups, and increases your water volume. You can run one of the larger tanks as a sump/planted set up and put a divider in the other to separate grown males/females. You need sponge pre-filters on the overflow pick ups and watch out for evaporation. Lots of surface area means lots of water lost. I evaporate about half a gallon to a gallon per day and all my stuff has glass lids.

Good luck.

Edit. Forgot to say look out for false females in your non breeding female tank. It does happen. I had one male that looked round, had no gonopodium visible and failed to display color for 4 months. That was a snafu.
 
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Ethan30

Member
Ok I will run things here. Here is the context, 2 Females Guppies, would that change your opinions on this, any ways to make a 5 gallon work?
 

MissNoodle

Member
Ethan30 said:
Ok I will run things here. Here is the context, 2 Females Guppies, would that change your opinions on this, any ways to make a 5 gallon work?
If just a 5 gallon for TWO, it could work.

But for more, it wouldnt be good for longer than a week.
 
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