My guppy breeding thread*

Ethan30

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This is where this operation will be centralized. * is for some issues may get their own threads. Before we start based on what I said in other threads about the cloudyness and fish count etc, could you let me know their or here if I am ready to begin?

@emeraldking @H Farnsworth @bizaliz3 @MissNoodle @FinalFins @saltwater60 @Feohw @Heron @Platylover @Momgoose56 @PascalKrypt @eirynne @Algonquin @wd67 @Crispii

This is where disscutions will go now.

Here is the in general I am getting from you guys

1. Large DIY tanks are a good idea
2. Pleco NEEDS to go
3. 10 g works but is not ideal for breeding

Anything else I should know before start breeding
 

Whitewolf

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The only thing you need to know that is a right/wrong way to do it is, guppies must have clean water. Substrate that harbors left over rotting food, dead decaying fish, fish feces, is no good and they will get sick. That's why a lot of serious breeders use bare bottom tanks or ponds. Guppies thrive in clean, low nitrate water. Live floating plants like anacharis, hornwort, or najas "guppy" grass, or water sprite, can hide fry and absorb nitrates. Other than that you should have at all times 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, and below 20 nitrates. Lakes in nature have 0,0,0 Plants absorb nitrates, and anerobic bacteria eat aerobic bacteria. The only way to get that in your fish aquarium is to change the water. A lot, I do it every other day. (with a tube, I suck up feces from my bare bottom tanks, and do this every other day on 18 tanks)

The other stuff you have questions about, that is a matter of preference. No set way of doing things, its all a matter of preference. But you have to have 0,0,>20 and clean tanks that dont have lots of rotting **** in the gravel. The more decaying stuff at the bottom and nasty smelly gravel or sand, the more your guppies will get sick.... aim for clean tanks and 0 0 0
 
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Ethan30

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The only thing you need to know that is a right/wrong way to do it is, guppies must have clean water. Substrate that harbors left over rotting food, dead decaying fish, fish feces, is no good and they will get sick. That's why a lot of serious breeders use bare bottom tanks or ponds. Guppies thrive in clean, low nitrate water. Live floating plants like anacharis, hornwort, or najas "guppy" grass, or water sprite, can hide fry and absorb nitrates. Other than that you should have at all times 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, and below 20 nitrates. Lakes in nature have 0,0,0 Plants absorb nitrates, and anerobic bacteria eat aerobic bacteria. The only way to get that in your fish aquarium is to change the water. A lot, I do it every other day. (with a tube, I suck up feces from my bare bottom tanks, and do this every other day on 18 tanks)

The other stuff you have questions about, that is a matter of preference. No set way of doing things, its all a matter of preference. But you have to have 0,0,>20 and clean tanks that dont have lots of rotting **** in the gravel. The more decaying stuff at the bottom and nasty smelly gravel or sand, the more your guppies will get sick.... aim for clean tanks and 0 0 0
I was thinking of using containers I use for other stuff for like this:

51F580AF-2B53-49C0-88F9-FCD33A5904B8.jpeg
 

FinalFins

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This is what I was th
1. Large DIY tanks are a good idea
2. Pleco NEEDS to go
3. 10 g works but is not ideal for breeding

Anything else I should know before start breeding
Well large tanks are generally a good idea.

Pleco does need to go for sure.

10g will work as a growout tank. After they hit 3/4 of a inch to 1 inch, back in the tank you go.

So before you start, first please please get a 25+ gallon, preferably a 29 gallon to start this out.

How do you vacuum gravel without vacuuming fry?
Work around them. Or put a sponge on the end of the vacuum so no fry are sucked in.
 
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Ethan30

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This is what I was th


Well large tanks are generally a good idea.

Pleco does need to go for sure.

10g will work as a growout tank. After they hit 3/4 of a inch to 1 inch, back in the tank you go.

So before you start, first please please get a 25+ gallon, preferably a 29 gallon to start this out.
Work around them. Or put a sponge on the end of the vacuum so no fry are sucked in.
I would not use gravel. I could use a vacuum in the corner and make sure fish stay away.

I would not use gravel. I could use a vacuum in the corner and make sure fish stay away.
How do you vacuum gravel without vacuuming fry?
Oops forgot to quote you in
 

Whitewolf

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I suck into a 5 gallon bucket. Run a pump to my python tube that runs into the shower bathroom drain. Its a sump pump sold at a LFS cost me $30. It has a 1" tine adaptor and it has a cover with mesh so no fry get sucked yp. After a water change i unplug the pump some water stays in my bucket and ill catch fry with a brine shrimp net and out them back in the fry tanks.
 
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Ethan30

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I suck into a 5 gallon bucket. Run a pump to my python tube that runs into the shower bathroom drain. Its a sump pump sold at a LFS cost me $30. It has a 1" tine adaptor and it has a cover with mesh so no fry get sucked yp. After a water change i unplug the pump some water stays in my bucket and ill catch fry with a brine shrimp net and out them back in the fry tanks.
ok
 

Momgoose56

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This is where this operation will be centralized. * is for some issues may get their own threads. Before we start based on what I said in other threads about the cloudyness and fish count etc, could you let me know their or here if I am ready to begin?

@emeraldking @H Farnsworth @bizaliz3 @MissNoodle @FinalFins @saltwater60 @Feohw @Heron @Platylover @Momgoose56 @PascalKrypt @eirynne @Algonquin @wd67 @Crispii

This is where disscutions will go now.

Here is the in general I am getting from you guys

1. Large DIY tanks are a good idea
2. Pleco NEEDS to go
3. 10 g works but is not ideal for breeding

Anything else I should know before start breeding
You need appropriate sized heaters in all those tubs. Guppys are tropical fish. Fry will die if the water is too cold. You'll need to place the heaters so they aren't touching the sides or bottom of the plastic containers. They can get hot enough to melt plastic. The suction cups on heaters may or may not stick to plastic. You'll also need airstones if you don't have filters. Water needs to move for oxygen, CO2 and other gasses to be exchanged adequately for fish in water. Sponge filters would be better. You'll need a good Master test kit that tests at minimum, pH, ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Fry are very sensitive to water conditions (ammonia, nitrites and nitrates) and you'll need to keep those at 0ppm. If you get sponge filters for the bins ahead of time and cycle them first, you'll save yourself lots of time and water.
Before you start breeding guppys for money, check your market for them. Call some local fish stores and see if they will buy guppies from you and how much they'll pay for them. Typically fish stores mark up livestock 100 to 300%. Which means if you see a guppy for sale at a fish store for $1.00, The store probably paid 25 to 50 cents for it. Good luck with your endeavor! I hope you can sell lots of guppys.
 
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Ethan30

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You need appropriate sized heaters in all those tubs. Guppys are tropical fish. Fry will die if the water is too cold. You'll need to place the heaters so they aren't touching the sides or bottom of the plastic containers. They can get hot enough to melt plastic. The suction cups on heaters may or may not stick to plastic. You'll also need airstones if you don't have filters. Water needs to move for oxygen, CO2 and other gasses to be exchanged adequately for fish in water. Sponge filters would be better. You'll need a good Master test kit that tests at minimum, pH, ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Fry are very sensitive to water conditions (ammonia, nitrites and nitrates) and you'll need to keep those at 0ppm. If you get sponge filters for the bins ahead of time and cycle them first, you'll save yourself lots of time and water.
Before you start breeding guppys for money, check your market for them. Call some local fish stores and see if they will buy guppies from you and how much they'll pay for them. Typically fish stores mark up livestock 100 to 300%. Which means if you see a guppy for sale at a fish store for $1.00, The store probably paid 25 to 50 cents for it. Good luck with your endeavor! I hope you can sell lots of guppys.
Thanks, ok I will consider this
 
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Ethan30

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I will be busy so might not see a lot of posts. May not even see the replies to this. Wanted to say thanks to everyone who is helping.
 
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Ethan30

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@Momgoose56 @Whitewolf @Sorg67 @H Farnsworth @FinalFins

Would this work?

I was thinking of killing 2 birds with 1 stone by making the pleco the cleaner fish in the 3 mouth old area, the largest so he wont eat them, if I bred 2 guppies how large would their area with the pleco need to be? Would it work at all?

On an unrelated note, sorry to push this again but if you haven't could fill out this survey? It makes this process more simple for me. (unless me writing this would be self promotion so in that case forget it)

Is it ok to breed guppies in a 10g tank - Guppy 428332

If you are seeing this and don't care to fill it our let me know that's fine.
 

FinalFins

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Plecos are not cleaner fish and should never be considered cleaner fish. But if the 3 month old area is a tank of 25+ gallon then sure, but plecos need dedicated feeding and create alot of waste.
 
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Ethan30

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Plecos are not cleaner fish and should never be considered cleaner fish. But if the 3 month old area is a tank of 25+ gallon then sure, but plecos need dedicated feeding and create alot of waste.
I agree, I wasn't saying I wouldnt feed it, I was just saying it also might help cleaning. Not to say I do less, but more a backup if I forget or somthing.
 

FinalFins

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TBH, Plecos will create more waste than they will clean. Its like usung a puppy to clean up table scraps. More of a backup for what? If you have a pleco, usually you want to start doing 2x weekly water changes.

What is the tank size of the 3 month old tank?
 
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Ethan30

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TBH, Plecos will create more waste than they will clean. Its like usung a puppy to clean up table scraps. More of a backup for what? If you have a pleco, usually you want to start doing 2x weekly water changes.

What is the tank size of the 3 month old tank?
Oh ok, good to know, where do I put him until the new tanks are ready and water is cycled? Current tank is 10 gallons. Upgraded tank I dont have yet.
 

Momgoose56

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Oh ok, good to know, where do I put him until the new tanks are ready and water is cycled? Current tank is 10 gallons. Upgraded tank I dont have yet.
You only have a 2.5 and a 10 gallon tank right? There IS no other place for you to put him.
 

GuppyDazzle

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Here is the in general I am getting from you guys

1. Large DIY tanks are a good idea
2. Pleco NEEDS to go
3. 10 g works but is not ideal for breeding

Anything else I should know before start breeding
The pleco might need to go, but numbers 1 and 3 are completely wrong.

If you're serious about breeding guppies, you need lots and lots of tanks. If you look at the fish rooms of any top guppy breeder, by far the most common size is 10G's. Sometimes 5's are used for breeders, but most commonly guppies are bred in 10's.

Unless you're completely flying by the seat of your pants and have no plan for controlling the population, you need to separate the male and female fry at about 1 month of age. You have to keep each drop separate, and keep the males and females separate. How many tanks per line depends on how many drops you're going to take from your breeding stock. Each drop requires two tanks. Personally, I take two drops from each set of breeders, which means I need four tanks reserved for at least six months in order to separate the males and females and grow out to sell or show. The breeders need to be discarded in some way, because there's simply not room for any more fry.

If you're setting up large tanks for guppy breeding, you're going to be throwing lots of different lines and different ages together, and it will be impossible to selectively breed. In all cases, unless you have an outlet for hundreds of guppies every month, you'll rely on overcrowding to control the population.
 
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