My Ghost Shrimp Killer Help

Discussion in 'Ghost Shrimp' started by Wonderlandess, Jan 29, 2019.

  1. Wonderlandess

    WonderlandessNew MemberMember

    Messages:
    6
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +1
    Experience:
    Just started
    Recently, in fact like 3 days ago I had put in 2 new rosy red minnows. My 10 gallon had originally 5 rosy red minnows and 3 ghost shrimp, Well, I had liked the aesthetic of not having a lid and didn't realize the full uses of a lid. I learned my lesson however when I came back from winter break to my dorm and found one of my poor rosy red minnows had jumped out and died. So between that and the aquarium's glass breaking (the rest of the animals were okay, the crack was high enough to where it was okay temporarily). I got a new aquarium (and a new lid which I definitely keep on now).

    Anyway, I know that rosy red minnows should be kept in groups and I like to aim for five-six, and I figured I would up my ghost shrimp number if I was heading to the store. I got 3 fully grown ghost shrimp (one or two even had eggs) and 2 rosy red minnows. The grey one seemed young but the other one was smaller still, maybe about an inch. Over the past few days I would see the orange one was always by itself on the other side of the tank while the others would be all together (including the new grey one). Just an hour ago I saw the young orange swimming at the top which I thought was incredibly strange, and upon closer inspection realized the top half of her back fin was gone as well as almost all of one of her ins on the side.

    I was getting ready to take her out, but I had to find my smallest net first which took a couple of minutes. By the time I got back, I didn't see her anywhere. It took me about a minute to find out where she had gone, and by then it was too late. My poor fish was captured and being eaten by one of the large ghost shrimp. By the time I was able to get him away and let go of it, she was dead :(

    So now I have 5 rosy red minnows, and 6 large ghost shrimp, I don't think I'm going to add in another rosy red minnow and when looking at the rest of my fishes, they seem fine. I'm thinking that the ghost shrimp won't attack the larger, adult minnows (all four are basically 3 inches), but i'm a little concerned about the other new one. He is about 1-2 centimeters bigger than the dead one (maybe. There was an obvious difference when they were next to each other, I think he's about the size of the ghost shrimp, not counting his fin.).

    Would it be alright to just leave the tank as is?
     
  2. richie.p

    richie.pFishlore VIPMember

    Messages:
    4,434
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Wales UK
    Ratings:
    +2,433
    Experience:
    5 to 10 years
    As a rule it's the other way around fish eat shrimp but,Ghost shrimp have a reputation of killing other shrimp as for your minnows unless they are sick or dead I don't think the shrimp will attack them the minnows are also fast, ide leave them
     
  3. bitseriously

    bitseriouslyWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    1,745
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    GTA, Ontario
    Ratings:
    +1,322
    Experience:
    1 year
    Agree iwth @richie.p above. Ghosts will grab a sick or slow moving fish if they can, but they aren't able to capture healthy fish. I had the same thing happen with a rummynose. It had just been added to my main tank (along with 3 others of its kind, joining an existing group of 4), and didn't take to the new tank for a few seconds, and in that time whoop, ghost shrimp grabbed it as it swam by among the bottom plants. Expensive shrimp food. :s
    That particular ghost was quite predatory. I had kept it with a long finned (and therefore slow moving) betta, and the day I saw it reach up and grab for the betta I moved it pronto. Then the rummynose incident, and when I finally saw it make a grab at my female ram, bye bye ghostie. It joined me on my very next trip to the lfs. I gather there are at least a couple of species of shrimps that we lump together as "ghost", so maybe some are more active hunters than others. Or maybe it's an individual, or age-related thing, or experience.
    I wouldn't expect any problems with your remaining fish, but keep an eye out just in case.
     
Loading...