My Fish Is Afraid Of Me?

Kobe
  • #1
Hey guys!

After sterilizing my 6-7 gallon tank and cycling it for about a week with bottled bacteria, I added in one baby ranchu goldfish.

When I was visiting my LFS, the ranchu I picked was active and was swimming -- overall looked pretty healthy. My LFS and their goldfish don't have a good reputation (they're mostly sick), but when I went by, some of them actually looked pretty healthy. Plus, they just told me they just put these fish in.

When I acclimated it to my tank for about an hour, it seemed to be very tentative and scared even in the plastic bag. I put in my fish afterwards, and all it would do now is hang around the filter. Sometimes, when I'm out of the room, it starts exploring the tank, but when I open the door my ranchu immediately goes back to the filter.

Is it sick? Or is this normal when adding new fish? I haven't had a goldfish that was this scared or timid when I'm around, they're usually really social and friendly with me.I know my setup is not ideal, but I have two filters and am planning to change the water frequently. What can I do to help my ranchu out?

Thanks for the help!

EDIT: I forgot to mention when I added my ranchu. I added my fish yesterday afternoon!
 
Fish-keeper
  • #2
Hey guys!

After sterilizing my 6-7 gallon tank and cycling it for about a week with bottled bacteria, I added in one baby ranchu goldfish.

When I was visiting my LFS, the ranchu I picked was active and was swimming -- overall looked pretty healthy. My LFS and their goldfish don't have a good reputation (they're mostly sick), but when I went by, some of them actually looked pretty healthy. Plus, they just told me they just put these fish in.

When I acclimated it to my tank for about an hour, it seemed to be very tentative and scared even in the plastic bag. I put in my fish afterwards, and all it would do now is hang around the filter. Sometimes, when I'm out of the room, it starts exploring the tank, but when I open the door my ranchu immediately goes back to the filter.

Is it sick? Or is this normal when adding new fish? I haven't had a goldfish that was this scared or timid when I'm around, they're usually really social and friendly with me.I know my setup is not ideal, but I have two filters and am planning to change the water frequently. What can I do to help my ranchu out?

Here's a video:

Thanks for the help!

Might I ask how long ago you added your fish?
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
Might I ask how long ago you added your fish?
Sorry, I forgot to mention it in my post! I added them yesterday, late afternoon.
 
Fish-keeper
  • #4
That is completely normal fish take while to settle into there new homes and it can take up to 3 or 4 weeks.
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
That is completely normal fish take while to settle into there new homes and it can take up to 3 or 4 weeks.
Is there anything I can do to help? My tank is pretty open (it has no decorations) due to the small amount of space. Should I add decorations or little hiding spots?

My fish won't eat with me around the tank. When I'm finally not in my room, it only eats a little of the food I give him, so I'm pretty worried.
 
Fish-keeper
  • #6
I personally have a 5 gallon tank and I have lots of decoration in my tank, adding hiding places and plants will help a lot. But your fish will hide and you might not see them for a few days.

I am really sorry but I have to go,I will reply later.
 
r5n8xaw00
  • #7
Like others have said, your fish needs sometime to get used to its new surroundings, and putting things inside for it to hide will make it feel more secure.
 
Jenoli42
  • #8
hI you said you cycled your tank for a week. do you have a testing kit? Do you know the ammonia, nitrite, nitrate & pH? if your fish isn't eating much, you might want to check if it's your water parameters stressing it. if you don't, take a clean glass jar of your tank water to your lfs and get them to test for free.

otherwise I agree it takes a wee while for your fish to get used to a new home. a few hiding spots / decorations would be nice.

having said that, your ranchu will quickly outgrow your tank . 10gallons is bare minimum & the rule of thumb for goldfish as I've read over & over for my nearly 12yo daughter is 20 gallon min for 1, 10 gallon for each additional fish. ..

I don't mean to bum you out with this info, but I'm sure you want happy healthy fish to enjoy
 
BReefer97
  • #9
Are you planning on getting a larger tank for this fish any time soon? 10 gallons is the minimum for only a small/baby ranchu. Goldfish such as this one need at least 20 gallons as they grow up to 5 inches big, and a 6-7 gallon isn’t going to house it comfortably for very long. It may also very well stunt the fish’s growth and cause deformities.
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
HI guys! Thanks for the information -- I already researched about goldfish before getting my ranchu, and I am planning to get another one once it gets bigger. I'm planning to do a 25% water change per week, but should I do more considering the size of my tank?

As for cycling, I followed the directions on the bottle. It told me to let the tank run for about a week, putting in the bacteria each day. I don't have a test kit -- should I get one? My ranchu's eating (I think), because when I'm gone from the room, the pellets I put in were gone. It seems to be swimming around the tank and not just the under the filter when it's dark and at night, probably because it can't see me.

Also, if anyone knows great resources for goldfish care, please tell! I've only got Solid Gold Aquatics' YouTube channel and the goldfish forum here.

In addition to that, I read online that goldfish shouldn't be fed a diet of only pellets. Can I feed them a variety of pellets, shrimp and bloodworms? I saw some at my LFS and was wondering if goldfish would eat them.
 
Fish-keeper
  • #11
In addition to that, I read online that goldfish shouldn't be fed a diet of only pellets. Can I feed them a variety of pellets, shrimp and bloodworms? I saw some at my LFS and was wondering if goldfish would eat them.

Bloodworms are a good source of nutrients for your fish, however only feed them the bloodworms as a treat now and again no more then once a week. I would also suggest maybe getting a bigger tank for your fish or putting it in a pond as it will quickly outgrow its tank.

Also I would recommend that you leave the light off for the next day or two so the fish can get used to it’s tank quicker. A dark tank means that the fish will be able to explore its surroundings without the interference from the outside world.
 
Blitzar
  • #12
I would leave the light off a couple of days and don't feed him/her for that time. Start doing a light cycle on the third or fourth day. Start feeding him, but sit in the room, even just on your phone. Stay in there with him, and let him get used to you on his own terms.
 
Fish-keeper
  • #13
I would leave the light off a couple of days and don't feed him/her for that time. Start doing a light cycle on the third or fourth day. Start feeding him, but sit in the room, even just on your phone. Stay in there with him, and let him get used to you on his own terms.

That is fantastic advice.

I would also recommend investing in a timer for your light, an aquarium should have 6 hours of light a day you can come up to 12 hours but I would not recommend it.
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
My fish is nearby a window, so it gets natural light. I haven't turned on the lights since the first day (I probably shocked it with the lights), but I think it's getting better. It's still hanging by the filter, but at night it does tend to explore its own tank. I hope it starts to feed with me in the room, but still working on that!

Thanks guys!
 
Fish-keeper
  • #15
My fish is nearby a window, so it gets natural light. I haven't turned on the lights since the first day (I probably shocked it with the lights), but I think it's getting better. It's still hanging by the filter, but at night it does tend to explore its own tank. I hope it starts to feed with me in the room, but still working on that!

Thanks guys!

Good luck Kobe, I hope your fish settle in soon. Also placing your fish tank in direct sunlight will increase algae. This will make it more difficult and time consuming to clean.
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #16
Good luck Kobe, I hope your fish settle in soon. Also placing your fish tank in direct sunlight will increase algae. This will make it more difficult and time consuming to clean.
Thanks! I think my aquarium is shaded from the window's blinds, there hasn't been any rays of sun hitting it directly. In case of any green algae growing, will a toothbrush help clean it? I heard algae is good for fish, is that true?

Thanks for the help!
 
BonBonTheGuppy
  • #17
There is an algae scrapper which can be bought in a pet shop, but I use toothbrush instead

And yeah, I think some algae are good for fishes. They eat them, see, but I don't like them in tanks since it turns ugly
 
MoonsCow
  • #18
I know this topic may have conflicting views as to acclimate to ph or just temperature, but I just want to put some different options out there.
I know lots of people advise going the slow route and acclimating for parameters as well as temperature, but this way also causes a lot of stress on the fish having the process stretched out for a long period of time and being trapped in their bag.
I have also seen people advise going a quicker route and just acclimating to temperature then adding the fish. Yes this can shock your fish as well but the gradual addition of parameters into their bag can also be harmful.
Could also take a little of both methods and aclimate to temperature first then fill the bag up with half tank water adding the fish after a few minutes.
All I can say for sure is none of the options are the best ones to be used in all situations. Such as if the fish have been traveling for a long time the water in the bag can potentially have toxic levels of ammonia or that certain live aquatics like corals are extremely sensitive to changes in parameters.
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #19
Day 3: he's still scared to death of me, but at least he's eating! I have to admit that I'm getting a little impatient, but I put in a little hidey-hole he can use. How long does it take for fish to settle in, usually? Days or weeks?

I know this topic may have conflicting views as to acclimate to ph or just temperature, but I just want to put some different options out there.
I know lots of people advise going the slow route and acclimating for parameters as well as temperature, but this way also causes a lot of stress on the fish having the process stretched out for a long period of time and being trapped in their bag.
I have also seen people advise going a quicker route and just acclimating to temperature then adding the fish. Yes this can shock your fish as well but the gradual addition of parameters into their bag can also be harmful.
Could also take a little of both methods and aclimate to temperature first then fill the bag up with half tank water adding the fish after a few minutes.
All I can say for sure is none of the options are the best ones to be used in all situations. Such as if the fish have been traveling for a long time the water in the bag can potentially have toxic levels of ammonia or that certain live aquatics like corals are extremely sensitive to changes in parameters.
For my acclimation, I floated them in the bag for about an hour (that's what my LFS told me). I think I might have shocked the fish by suddenly turning on the lights while it was still in the bag. Maybe that's why it's still scared and frantic when it sees me?
 
MsMarch
  • #20
Definitely depends on temperament. My rasboras took a full week to start eating and acting normally. Fish are naturally pretty skittish, so I'd just give him time. I doubt it was the light, that's just a temporary shock-- he's probably more stressed about being thrown into an unfamiliar place. Once he realizes that you have the food, he'll become a lot more sociable
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #21
Definitely depends on temperament. My rasboras took a full week to start eating and acting normally. Fish are naturally pretty skittish, so I'd just give him time. I doubt it was the light, that's just a temporary shock-- he's probably more stressed about being thrown into an unfamiliar place. Once he realizes that you have the food, he'll become a lot more sociable
Great, thanks! The only thing I care about now is that he's eating. He's not even using the hiding thing I gave him -- he must really like the filter. Was worried that there was something wrong with him, turns out he just needs a little bit more time to get used to his environment.

Once I showed my parents how big ranchu get, they're planning on getting a 15 gallon soon. I know it's not quite as much as the 20 gallon minimum, but that's the only size that'll fit in my room.
 
Fish-keeper
  • #22
Thanks! I think my aquarium is shaded from the window's blinds, there hasn't been any rays of sun hitting it directly. In case of any green algae growing, will a toothbrush help clean it? I heard algae is good for fish, is that true?

Thanks for the help!

How is the tank going?
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #23
How is the tank going?
Not anything new to be honest! My ranchu isn't scared of me during feed time (I turn my HOB and sponge filter off during the feeding, as well as sitting next to the tank as he/she eats), and sometimes I catch it exploring the tank while I'm right next to it. Most of the time, it's still hanging by the filter, but it's only been a couple of days and only time will tell!

Are there anything else that helps with reducing stress? I read online that while fish are stressed, they lose part of their slime coat and make that susceptible to disease. Anything so I can make my ranchu feel better?

Thanks for the help, guys! I'll post another vid/update soon!!

Also, quick question: I'm preparing to do a water change tomorrow (it's been about 5 days since I added my ranchu), should I do it or will it just add to its stress? I normally do it on Fridays, but since I added it 5 days ago I can wait another 2 days to do a water change.
 
uspatriot
  • #24
I've had fish that are "friendly" right off the bat. I've had fish that hid their entire lives and everything in between.

Some of my Discus had to be moved in an emergency. Before the move they would meet me at the front of the tank anytime I walked by. After the transfer to an emergency tank and then back to a permanent tank over a matter of a couple of weeks, they "ran" and hid every time they saw me. After about 3 weeks they were all back to normal.

My point is, no 2 fish have the same temperament nor conditions and some just take longer to settle in than others. The tank size may lengthen the time, but not necessarily. The lack of cover could be a factor as well. But again, maybe not.

I would DEFINITELY have your water parameters checked. Ammonia, Nitrites or high Nitrates are the biggest stresses a fish can have. If those aren't right not only will he hide, he could very well die.

You can and should do a water change at least once a week regardless of your fish's temperament.
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #25
I've had fish that are "friendly" right off the bat. I've had fish that hid their entire lives and everything in between.

Some of my Discus had to be moved in an emergency. Before the move they would meet me at the front of the tank anytime I walked by. After the transfer to an emergency tank and then back to a permanent tank over a matter of a couple of weeks, they "ran" and hid every time they saw me. After about 3 weeks they were all back to normal.

My point is, no 2 fish have the same temperament nor conditions and some just take longer to settle in than others. The tank size may lengthen the time, but not necessarily. The lack of cover could be a factor as well. But again, maybe not.

I would DEFINITELY have your water parameters checked. Ammonia, Nitrites or high Nitrates are the biggest stresses a fish can have. If those aren't right not only will he hide, he could very well die.

You can and should do a water change at least once a week regardless of your fish's temperament.

Thanks for the advice! I'm having my water parameters checked at my LFS sometime tomorrow, so right now I'm just looking for any telltale signs of bad water quality (ammonia burns, gasping at the surface, etc). The only thing that seems to be troubling/scaring him right now is me!

Today I sat next to the tank for a good 20 minutes while I was on my phone. Most of the time he stayed near the filter, but ever so often he would swim up to me and explore for a bit. When I turn my head though, he would immediately dart back to the filter. Oh well haha!
 
Demeterite
  • #26
Sooooo... I read your profile and saw you posted in December about being brand-new to the hobby and came into it as a Christmas gift. Welcome! I'm pretty new too, but I've picked up a few tricks along the way. I'm really surprised no one else has asked this yet but....

I noticed you "cycling" your tank was just one week of adding bottled bacteria.... did you do anything else? Did you test it daily to actually make sure it cycled?

I've found that the "instant cycle" products I used did NOT do an instant-cycle, not even close, so I've been a little wary of them since. If just using bottled bacteria, like you alluded to above, they still need something to eat. Did you add ammonia or flakes for them to eat? Did you use filtered media from your other tank?

Yes, PLEASE get a testing kit. Preferrably one that is drops, not strips, such as the API Master blah blah blah for freshwater test kit. It's really important that you know where you are in the cycle.

Without the kit and without testing your water you have no way of knowing if the water/filter had actually cycled prior to adding the new goldfish. Your parameters might be stressing/fatal to your fish over the next few weeks if you're not actually cycled.

Second question - You had WAY too many goldfish in a 15-gal just in December. You're now adding another baby goldfish into a 6-7 gal? Did you get the 50gal tank already? I know your profile says you're 14 so you may be waiting on parental assistance....
 
Jim Johnson
  • #27
From my experience I found that fish like a place to hide especially at night when they sleep. By looking at your tank you have no gravel or sand, no plants or anyplace for them to go to feel comfortable. Because of this your fish tension is extemely high and with high tension your fish will die. Could you imagine yourself all day and everyday living in a room with four bare walls and no furniture. You might try dressing the place up. Happy fish make better pets and they won't be afraid of you knowing they have an escape if need be.
Good Luck,

Jim
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #28
Sooooo... I read your profile and saw you posted in December about being brand-new to the hobby and came into it as a Christmas gift. Welcome! I'm pretty new too, but I've picked up a few tricks along the way. I'm really surprised no one else has asked this yet but....

I noticed you "cycling" your tank was just one week of adding bottled bacteria.... did you do anything else? Did you test it daily to actually make sure it cycled?

I've found that the "instant cycle" products I used did NOT do an instant-cycle, not even close, so I've been a little wary of them since. If just using bottled bacteria, like you alluded to above, they still need something to eat. Did you add ammonia or flakes for them to eat? Did you use filtered media from your other tank?

Yes, PLEASE get a testing kit. Preferrably one that is drops, not strips, such as the API Master blah blah blah for freshwater test kit. It's really important that you know where you are in the cycle.

Without the kit and without testing your water you have no way of knowing if the water/filter had actually cycled prior to adding the new goldfish. Your parameters might be stressing/fatal to your fish over the next few weeks if you're not actually cycled.

Second question - You had WAY too many goldfish in a 15-gal just in December. You're now adding another baby goldfish into a 6-7 gal? Did you get the 50gal tank already? I know your profile says you're 14 so you may be waiting on parental assistance....

Hi! Thank you for the welcome! I forgot that I posted another thread here. After one of my fish dying in that 15-gallon, I decided to donate three of my goldfish to my friend's pond. The 15-gallon I gave back to the pet store due to it cracking. My parents are still wondering if I'm responsible enough to care for a 20-50g, so they gave me this temporary tank instead. I've protested MANY times against them, but they still won't listen!!

For the cycling, I did use the HOB filter from my older tank. My older tank wasn't cycled, but it did run for a couple weeks before I deconstructed it. My sponge filter is brand new.

For the bottled bacteria I used (I used Stress Zyme, which was what my LFS recommended) I followed the instructions on the bottle -- it told me to put in a dose every day for the week, while adding things to feed the beneficial bacteria (I just added a couple fish flakes and pellets). I don't have a testing kit yet -- I'm going to my LFS tomorrow in order to test things, but I am getting a test kit soon. I noticed there are some for pH, some for ammonia, others for nitrate/nitrite -- which one should I pick or should I pick all of them??

Starting to notice that all of the advice the LFS people told me are false!!

From my experience I found that fish like a place to hide especially at night when they sleep. By looking at your tank you have no gravel or sand, no plants or anyplace for them to go to feel comfortable. Because of this your fish tension is extemely high and with high tension your fish will die. Could you imagine yourself all day and everyday living in a room with four bare walls and no furniture. You might try dressing the place up. Happy fish make better pets and they won't be afraid of you knowing they have an escape if need be.
Good Luck,

Jim

I do have some sand in my aquarium (it's like a centimeter thick, probably unnoticeable from the camera), should I add more due to how little I have? After the advice people gave me here, I put in a little cave thing for my ranchu to hide in. He hasn't used it yet, but I hope he does!

Thanks for the advice!

Sooooo... I read your profile and saw you posted in December about being brand-new to the hobby and came into it as a Christmas gift. Welcome! I'm pretty new too, but I've picked up a few tricks along the way. I'm really surprised no one else has asked this yet but....

I noticed you "cycling" your tank was just one week of adding bottled bacteria.... did you do anything else? Did you test it daily to actually make sure it cycled?

I've found that the "instant cycle" products I used did NOT do an instant-cycle, not even close, so I've been a little wary of them since. If just using bottled bacteria, like you alluded to above, they still need something to eat. Did you add ammonia or flakes for them to eat? Did you use filtered media from your other tank?

Yes, PLEASE get a testing kit. Preferrably one that is drops, not strips, such as the API Master blah blah blah for freshwater test kit. It's really important that you know where you are in the cycle.

Without the kit and without testing your water you have no way of knowing if the water/filter had actually cycled prior to adding the new goldfish. Your parameters might be stressing/fatal to your fish over the next few weeks if you're not actually cycled.

Second question - You had WAY too many goldfish in a 15-gal just in December. You're now adding another baby goldfish into a 6-7 gal? Did you get the 50gal tank already? I know your profile says you're 14 so you may be waiting on parental assistance....

Also, in the event my tank parameters aren't up to what they should be: how many water changes should I be doing? I'm changing the water today and I'll probably do it again in a few several days, but what I'm scared of is that it might stress the ranchu even more.
 
javis
  • #29
This was the case with my first angelfish last year, when I first added him in, he wasn't very likely to come up to the front of the tank, he would only stay behind the plants with me in the room and would explore if I stayed completely still and didn't even eat unless I was outside the room, I had the same concern as you and was searching online for why, but after a week or so, he got used to his new home and started venturing around more and more and after a month, he was completely adjusted and goes all over the tank and is always ready to eat when I get near him
 
Demeterite
  • #30
they gave me this temporary tank instead. I've protested MANY times against them, but they still won't listen!!
Talk to them about getting a fish that FITS that size aquarium instead of one that needs a bigger aquarium down the road. Fish grow quickly! There are a few threads on here about what fits in various size aquariums. A goldfish is not the right choice, but there are some that are. One single betta plus a snail, for example. Other options may be guppies or tetras but I'm no stocking expert so best to start a new thread or search for others.

I'm going to my LFS tomorrow in order to test things, but I am getting a test kit soon. I noticed there are some for pH, some for ammonia, others for nitrate/nitrite -- which one should I pick or should I pick all of them??
You're going to want to get one that tests with drops, not strips. The best here is the API Freshwater Master Test Kit. It does ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate. You need all three of these to track your cycle. It also does pH which is great to know.

I do have some sand in my aquarium (it's like a centimeter thick, probably unnoticeable from the camera), should I add more due to how little I have? After the advice people gave me here, I put in a little cave thing for my ranchu to hide in. He hasn't used it yet, but I hope he does!
I would do more, personally. I like to have about an inch. I was told a good rule of thumb is 1lb of sand or gravel per gallon.

A cave is a great start. Many fish like to have more of a tunnel as well, ie something with two exits like a piece of new, cleaned PVC.

I would also recommend you get a plant of some sort - whether real (java ferns are nice) or silk.

Also, in the event my tank parameters aren't up to what they should be: how many water changes should I be doing? I'm changing the water today and I'll probably do it again in a few several days, but what I'm scared of is that it might stress the ranchu even more.
The parameters tell you how much water to change. For example, if you have 40ppm nitrate and your goal is 20ppm, then you do a 50% water change. Etc.

I was told that as long as you CONDITION the new water and make sure it's the same temperature as the water you're taking out then there's no such thing as too many water changes stressing a fish. They like clean water just like we like clean air.
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #31
Talk to them about getting a fish that FITS that size aquarium instead of one that needs a bigger aquarium down the road. Fish grow quickly! There are a few threads on here about what fits in various size aquariums. A goldfish is not the right choice, but there are some that are. One single betta plus a snail, for example. Other options may be guppies or tetras but I'm no stocking expert so best to start a new thread or search for others.


You're going to want to get one that tests with drops, not strips. The best here is the API Freshwater Master Test Kit. It does ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate. You need all three of these to track your cycle. It also does pH which is great to know.


I would do more, personally. I like to have about an inch. I was told a good rule of thumb is 1lb of sand or gravel per gallon.

A cave is a great start. Many fish like to have more of a tunnel as well, ie something with two exits like a piece of new, cleaned PVC.

I would also recommend you get a plant of some sort - whether real (java ferns are nice) or silk.


The parameters tell you how much water to change. For example, if you have 40ppm nitrate and your goal is 20ppm, then you do a 50% water change. Etc.

I was told that as long as you CONDITION the new water and make sure it's the same temperature as the water you're taking out then there's no such thing as too many water changes stressing a fish. They like clean water just like we like clean air.

I just did a 25% water change, and I think I'm going to do it again probably tomorrow or the day after. Going to get the test kit soon, but while I was doing a water change I saw this little red dot on my ranchu. Did he injure himself or is this a disease?


HWwImFf.jpg
(Sorry for the bad picture, it's on my ranchu's tail. It's like a red spot).

He's really active as of performing the water change, swimming fast from end to end in the tank, but still darts away when I approach! Anything else that I can do for my ranchu to get comfortable?

Was unable to test my water parameters today, LFS was closed. I'm planning to do a water change tomorrow nevertheless! The red spot isn't getting any bigger, could it be an injury from hanging by the filter too much?
 
Lping7
  • #32
Hi!
Real cute goldfish there
Anyway, as for cycling with bottle bacteria, it works for me. Cycled a 75 gallon tank in 5 days with that stuff (100% sure it is cycled). Just put double the bacteria it says on the bottle for twice as long and you should be good to go. Too much bacteria isn’t bad.
My bloody parrots were scared of me for a good month and a half when I first got them. Be patient, your fish will eventually like you.
Good luck!
 
Kobe
  • Thread Starter
  • #33
HI guys! Thanks for all of the help!

Here's the update that Fish-keeper requested:


My aquarium usually has lights, but they are turned off because it makes the video blue! My goldfish is doing OK, still skittish and shy. I find him/her hiding in the cave-thing a lot, but I hope he/she will get used to me enough soon!

I'm doing water changes every 2 days for this 6-7 gallon aquarium just to make sure ammonia/nitrates are low. Is this enough or should I do more? I'm getting a 15-gallon for this guy once he gets bigger in a month or two!

I was really worried since my LFS and their goldfish are sickly and unhealthy. They have around 3-4 tanks of goldfish, and all of them had goldfish sitting on the bottom, swimming upright, etc -- this ranchu was one of the few that looked moderately healthy, so I picked it!

He/she has been growing this past week and I was wondering if 2 small feedings a day is enough? When I'm cleaning the tank I sometimes see medium-sized strings of poop. I read that long strings of poop is because of constipation?

I'm feeding my goldfish commercial pellets and a few bloodworms every now and then, but I heard that floating pellets aren't good for goldfish. I'm thinking of looking for gel foods or sinking pellets, but my LFS might not have them!

Thanks for all the help! I'll keep you posted if there's anything wrong with my goldfish.

Also, I saw some really cool pics of ranchus with that big, red-growth thing they have on their heads. How can I try and do that for my goldfish? I know he/she's only like a baby (I think maybe 3 months old? I don't know its actual age), but I want to try and see if I can maximize that head-growth cause it looks really cool!
 
Lping7
  • #34
The head thing... it’s genetic I think. Some fish will have bigger humps and some will have smaller humps. I’m pretty sure there’s a way to make the head hump bigger though
 

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