My First Saltwater Tank (nsw)

Jesterrace

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Yeah, I agree I would at least double what is in there for the biological filter factor as well.
 
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sanjay7

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DutchAquarium said:
I would definetly add in some more rock. The damsels might get a bit territorial with each other.
Yes damsel not letting clowns to go near the rock . I will add more rocks asap
 

stella1979

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Agreed with more rock being needed. It's good that you have some bio media in the sump, but more rock will help in more ways than the biological filter. Aggression may decrease with more division between territories, and fish love having a place to feel safe.

Do you have a heater in the sump?
 
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sanjay7

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stella1979 said:
Agreed with more rock being needed. It's good that you have some bio media in the sump, but more rock will help in more ways than the biological filter. Aggression may decrease with more division between territories, and fish love having a place to feel safe.

Do you have a heater in the sump?
No I don't have heater. I live in Chennai, India (south India).my lfs says no need of heater at my place . And none of my lfs has heater. I don't have skimmer That'sy I change water regularly
 

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sanjay7 said:
No I don't have heater. I live in Chennai, India (south India).my lfs says no need of heater at my place . And none of my lfs has heater. I don't have skimmer That'sy I change water regularly
OK then. I live in South Florida where it is also very warm, but inside is cooler because of air conditioning. I have had power outages though, and then it gets very hot inside my home. At on time after a hurricane last year my tank almost died from getting too hot. So, it seems, in either case, I would need temperature control via a heater or a chiller. Heaters are a lot cheaper, lol.
 
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sanjay7

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Oh so if I install hater and set the temperature it would maintained same temperature untill I turn it off ? And what's the temperature ?
stella1979 said:
OK then. I live in South Florida where it is also very warm, but inside is cooler because of air conditioning. I have had power outages though, and then it gets very hot inside my home. At on time after a hurricane last year my tank almost died from getting too hot. So, it seems, in either case, I would need temperature control via a heater or a chiller. Heaters are a lot cheaper, lol.
 

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sanjay7 said:
Oh so if I install hater and set the temperature it would maintained same temperature untill I turn it off ? And what's the temperature ?
I'm not sure which heaters are available to you, or if you even need one. Plenty of fish rooms and fish stores prefer to keep the room temperature correct for their tanks rather than investing in multiple heaters for lots of tanks. You may very well be able to do the same thing if ambient temp in the room the tank is in is similar enough to the temp the tank needs.

I keep my reef tank at 78° Fahrenheit/25° Celsius. Nearly all of the aquarium heaters I've seen have an auto-off function, so it's not up to me to turn it off. When it reaches the set temperature, it shuts itself off. Heaters have also been known to malfunction, or perhaps they're just one of the first pieces of equipment that wears out over time. The thing is, they don't always break down in the off position, sometimes they get stuck on. So, there is a concern about them overheating and cooking your tank. For this reason, some people replace their heaters every year or two. My solution is to plug my heater into a temperature controller like and Inkbird. These controllers use a temperature probe in the tank and since the heater is plugged into the controller, it can cut off power to the heater when the tank reaches the set temp.

Of course, plenty of people don't worry about this at all, but I'd say it depends on your emotional and financial investment in the tank. I get very attached to my fish and have put a lot of money into a couple of my tanks, so I use Inkbirds.

Here's my heater -

Here's the Inkbird Temp Controller -

Here's the heater with the best reputation that I know of. Lots of my reefing friends love these and trust them to use without a temp controller.


I think if I were you I'd just get a simple thermometer to put in the tank. Monitor it and record temps a few times a day for a week or two, then check to see if you're getting fluctuations. If the temp is varying a lot, I would do my best to stabilize it.

If you feel that a cold time of year will chill your tank, have a heater on hand for those times.

If your heater has the auto-off function, then you won't have to worry about removing it from the tank, as it shouldn't heat the water when the temp is correct.

I did not mean to worry you about temperatures. Most homes in the US can get a bit chilly in the winter time at least, so heaters are almost always used here. I simply don't know if things are the same in India though.
 

Jesterrace

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Depends on which part of the country Sanjay lives in. Mornings during what most in the US would consider winter months can be a bit chilly in the Northern Part of the country.
 
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sanjay7

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stella1979 said:
I'm not sure which heaters are available to you, or if you even need one. Plenty of fish rooms and fish stores prefer to keep the room temperature correct for their tanks rather than investing in multiple heaters for lots of tanks. You may very well be able to do the same thing if ambient temp in the room the tank is in is similar enough to the temp the tank needs.

I keep my reef tank at 78° Fahrenheit/25° Celsius. Nearly all of the aquarium heaters I've seen have an auto-off function, so it's not up to me to turn it off. When it reaches the set temperature, it shuts itself off. Heaters have also been known to malfunction, or perhaps they're just one of the first pieces of equipment that wears out over time. The thing is, they don't always break down in the off position, sometimes they get stuck on. So, there is a concern about them overheating and cooking your tank. For this reason, some people replace their heaters every year or two. My solution is to plug my heater into a temperature controller like and Inkbird. These controllers use a temperature probe in the tank and since the heater is plugged into the controller, it can cut off power to the heater when the tank reaches the set temp.

Of course, plenty of people don't worry about this at all, but I'd say it depends on your emotional and financial investment in the tank. I get very attached to my fish and have put a lot of money into a couple of my tanks, so I use Inkbirds.

Here's my heater -

Here's the Inkbird Temp Controller -

Here's the heater with the best reputation that I know of. Lots of my reefing friends love these and trust them to use without a temp controller.


I think if I were you I'd just get a simple thermometer to put in the tank. Monitor it and record temps a few times a day for a week or two, then check to see if you're getting fluctuations. If the temp is varying a lot, I would do my best to stabilize it.

If you feel that a cold time of year will chill your tank, have a heater on hand for those times.

If your heater has the auto-off function, then you won't have to worry about removing it from the tank, as it shouldn't heat the water when the temp is correct.

I did not mean to worry you about temperatures. Most homes in the US can get a bit chilly in the winter time at least, so heaters are almost always used here. I simply don't know if things are the same in India though.
Yeah I actually took your advice and I was searching for heater. I previously had one for my freshwater fish "flower horn". LFS said it had auto turn off . So yeah I'm planning to get that soon. Yes I go in budget as I'm a student hobbyist . I use my pocket money for all this . Yes it's all about my issues .

I just got a clownfish mate for my old one .


Here is the video. Please do comment your views so that I can rectify my mistakes as I'm beginner. People like me will also get some knowledge about it . I watched lots of YouTube video to start a saltwater tank . Planning to go into reef.
Thanks for your support.

Jesterrace said:
Depends on which part of the country Sanjay lives in. Mornings during what most in the US would consider winter months can be a bit chilly in the Northern Part of the country.
I guess here it's fine without heater . anyway i will just get one .
 

stella1979

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Your fish seem to be getting along pretty well, but again, the first thing I would do is add more rock and maybe try to create some division so they can more easily spend time away from each other when they need to. They are all damsels, and all damsels are known to be a bit aggressive over territories.

Otherwise, we'd love to know more about your tank. Lots of questions...

How much water does it hold?
What are you using to measure the salinity, (salt content), of your water?
How are you providing saltwater? Are you testing the water? How much and how often do you change water?

Water evaporates but salt doesn't, meaning your tank gets saltier every day. Are you topping off with freshwater to be sure you maintain a stable salinity level?

The more we know, the more we can help.
 
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sanjay7

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stella1979 said:
Your fish seem to be getting along pretty well, but again, the first thing I would do is add more rock and maybe try to create some division so they can more easily spend time away from each other when they need to. They are all damsels, and all damsels are known to be a bit aggressive over territories.

Otherwise, we'd love to know more about your tank. Lots of questions...

How much water does it hold?
What are you using to measure the salinity, (salt content), of your water?
How are you providing saltwater? Are you testing the water? How much and how often do you change water?

Water evaporates but salt doesn't, meaning your tank gets saltier every day. Are you topping off with freshwater to be sure you maintain a stable salinity level?

The more we know, the more we can help.
The tank holds 18 gallon water.

I do 25-30% water change ever two weeks. Since I don't use skimmer.

TBH I only checke salt level initially with my cousin he has test kits . Now I didn't check .

I get water from sea with some basic filtration. I leave the water for 2 days to settle and I will find some brown colour thing at the bottom. I will just leave the bottom part of the collected water.

Yes I add freshwater when the water level goes down .


Yes I have to get rocks. Pretty busy with my semester exam.
I'm planning to get dry live rocks . Can you tell me what are the things which we should consider ? .
My lfs says that I can add dry rock directly into my established tank. Iam scared if it will give ammonia spike .
Shall I but and put in a bucket and run it in seawater as I use that in my tank for a week ?
 

Jesterrace

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I would definitely cycle the rock separately, it takes virtually all of the risk out of the equation for you and then once healthy bacteria has been established and is functioning you can transfer it straight to your current tank with minimal issues. FYI though I would keep your fish stock to a minimum until it's all in there as the addition of rock can be very stressful to fish, I am convinced it was a big part in what finally did my first Diamond Watchman Goby in.
 
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sanjay7

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Jesterrace said:
I would definitely cycle the rock separately, it takes virtually all of the risk out of the equation for you and then once healthy bacteria has been established and is functioning you can transfer it straight to your current tank with minimal issues. FYI though I would keep your fish stock to a minimum until it's all in there as the addition of rock can be very stressful to fish, I am convinced it was a big part in what finally did my first Diamond Watchman Goby in.
How long should I cycle the tank ?.

Btw there some white colour thing on my clownfishs . I noticed that yesterday. They seem fine . Is it a parasites ?
 
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