My cats have acne that rivals a human teenager's

WrenFeenix

I've been having a huge problem with catne (cat acne) with both my cats. I've already taken them to the vet twice (prescribed antibiotics), put them on a poultry-free diet, and I wash their chins with peroxidase shampoo several times a week. I think they keep reinfecting themselves because it's itchy, so they scratch their chins with their dirty feet. This has been going on for over a month now, and I'm getting really concerned about the infection spreading. I was planning on asking the vet to do a culture and/or an allergy test so we can properly nuke whatever this is.

My cats are actually in their teens, but this is ridiculous. Have your cats ever had catne? What was your experience?
 

betta06

our cat also gets this I clean his chin with warm water about once a week and it seems to stay under control.
 
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BigManAquatics

I had a cat with this pretty bad. I switched to a bigger food dish and it pretty much disappeared.
 
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WrenFeenix

I had a cat with this pretty bad. I switched to a bigger food dish and it pretty much disappeared.
That’s interesting! Usually people talk about the no plastic thing. How big, and do they have high or shallow sides?
Do you feed dry or wet food? I got high-sided bowls for their wet food, and it seems to help a little since they can’t grind their chins into the food anymore.
 
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Catappa

I'm very experienced with cats, sort of a "cat guru". The chin acne usually is due to a sensitivity to plastic. Switch to stainless steel, ceramic or glass feeding bowls. Hopefully it will clear up eventually. A shallow dish (larger is better) is considered best for cats. Your vet might want to prescribe a hydrocortisone cream instead of antibiotics. If so, apply a very thin layer and massage it in, then wash your hands well. Only use it for a couple of weeks.

Of course, there is always a chance that something else is exacerbating the skin problem. Most common irritants: any perfumed/deodorizer products, such as room aroma dispensers, scented candles, carpet/vacuum cleaner bag deodorizers or cleaning products containing lemon or citrus/lemon-scents. (Think of what their paws come in contact with.)

It might help to have a Feliway diffuser in the home, just to calm the cats, Good luck! (Been there, done that! Learned a lot through trial and error and several animal behaviorist and breeder friends.)
 
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WrenFeenix

I'm very experienced with cats, sort of a "cat guru". The chin acne usually is due to a sensitivity to plastic. Switch to stainless steel, ceramic or glass feeding bowls. Hopefully it will clear up eventually. A shallow dish (larger is better) is considered best for cats. Your vet might want to prescribe a hydrocortisone cream instead of antibiotics. If so, apply a very thin layer and massage it in, then wash your hands well. Only use it for a couple of weeks.

Of course, there is always a chance that something else is exacerbating the skin problem. Most common irritants: any perfumed/deodorizer products, such as room aroma dispensers, scented candles, carpet/vacuum cleaner bag deodorizers or cleaning products containing lemon or citrus/lemon-scents. (Think of what their paws come in contact with.)

It might help to have a Feliway diffuser in the home, just to calm the cats, Good luck! (Been there, done that! Learned a lot through trial and error and several animal behaviorist and breeder friends.)
One of my cats really likes eating on the floor; he’ll bat the food out of his bowl and eat it on the floor, so I’ve been feeding him on my countertop so at least he’s off the dirty floor. He’s too good for plates either. Would a food mat be a good idea, even though they might be plastic? I wash the counter every day, but his chin is starting to look like Jay Leno’s.

I didn’t think of hydrocortisone. I’ll ask the vet about it.
Could it be seasonal allergy related? Everyone has been dying from the pollenocalypse this spring, and the acne didn’t get bad until spring hit. The one cat that goes outside also has it worse (is also the one that eats off the floor). I’m not usually allergic to pollen either, but my car has turned yellow from being covered in it.
 
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Catappa

One of my cats really likes eating on the floor; he’ll bat the food out of his bowl and eat it on the floor, so I’ve been feeding him on my countertop so at least he’s off the dirty floor. He’s too good for plates either. Would a food mat be a good idea, even though they might be plastic? I wash the counter every day, but his chin is starting to look like Jay Leno’s.

I didn’t think of hydrocortisone. I’ll ask the vet about it.
Could it be seasonal allergy related? Everyone has been dying from the pollenocalypse this spring, and the acne didn’t get bad until spring hit. The one cat that goes outside also has it worse (is also the one that eats off the floor). I’m not usually allergic to pollen, but my car has turned yellow from being covered in it.
Of course, an allergy to something outside or a cleaning product used on the floor could be the culprit. I've never used a food mat, but if they're plastic, it might not be a good idea. A skin condition is always tricky, even for humans. Once a sensitive area develops, it's more likely to react to any irritant. But because the acne reaction to plastic bowls is so common, I'd start with rectifying that. If you can get hold of calendula lotion or salve, that is healing and soothing. I've used it for dogs before. It is also recommended for cats.
 
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Betta02

I don't have cats, but just throwing this out there. Every year about this time, my older horse gets what I call 'creeping crud' under his mane from sweating as the weather gets warmer. I don't think this is the issue with your cats, but I use a product called 'Banixx' for his skin issues. It's an anti-fungal spray, which knocks out the issue in just a few days. I apply it daily when the issues start, and then weekly as a preventative. I believe it is okay to use on cats, it is a spray. I would pour a little in a container and dab it on with a cotton ball or swab on their chin area. Because it isn't gooey, it would still allow the skin to get air, and hopefully dry out.
I would also agree with a shallow dish, prevents them from rubbing their chin in the wet food.
Just a thought. Skin issues can be a real headache.
 
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saintanna

I've used Noxzema wipes (like acne wipes) on one of my cat's chin. that and switching to a stainless steel bowl fixed his problem. haven't had an issue in over 2 years
 
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