Multi species breeding project

Johnb114

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Hey everyone

So I have two 75 gallons and a 33 long. Plan on trying to breed two or more species per Tank. I am aware that having a species only tank would be better but it is just a fun project. Also all tanks are fully cycled and water parameters are in check. Let me know what you guys think or if you guys think of a better combination.

So in the 33 long I plan on doing fire red shrimp with galaxy rasboras. Currently already have a few of each but never really colonized because of the guppies and Cory cats that I have in the tank. Thinking of doing 6-10 galaxy rasboras, depending on what is available for males and females. The 33 long is the tank with dwarf chain sword carpet and bolbitus.

For one of 75 gallons I plan on breeding bristlenose plecos and attempting to breed my false juliI cories. As well as some endlers. I already have a few plecos I have been growing out in that tank. Most are around breeding size.
Would like to do 2-3 males and 4-6 females. I have 3 different pleco caves already in the tank as well as tons of drift wood and rocks. Currently have 6 juliI cories and don’t plan on getting more. This 75 gallon is the one will all the driftwood and white sand in the left corner.

For the other 75 gallon I currently have 10 Otocinclus catfish. Going to attempt to breed those, do not have high hopes but figure it’s worth a shot. Also will be adding 30-40 blue velvet shrimp. This tank is the one with the bolbitus, crypts and star grass.

All tanks are running penn plax canister filters and sponge filters. Also have or will have sponges over the filter intakes.

If you guys have suggestions, comments or other possible stocking ideas let me know. Thanks
 

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CHJ

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I think you should breed your tanks together as they are all great looking.
 

Corydork

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Following this.
As Corydora breeder (yes, for profit, but not a big one) I can give you 4 pieces of advice to help you out.
1. The more flow in your tank the better, just make some spots for fish to hide from the current.
2. You can’t feed too much (just clean it up after a couple hours, better water means better hatch rate and more eggs)
3. Feed heavy 4-8 hours before a cold 30% water change.
4. Make sure you have more males than females. You’ll have to think at first when you start sexing cories, but it’ll quickly become something you do automatically. You’ll find that you can actually sex cories accurately at 3 months of age.

Bonus: Have fun! Just remember that you won’t have constant breeding unless you put in effort.

I wish I could help you with the other fish you want to breed, but cories are where my heart are.
 
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Johnb114

Johnb114

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Corydork said:
Following this.
As Corydora breeder (yes, for profit, but not a big one) I can give you 4 pieces of advice to help you out.
1. The more flow in your tank the better, just make some spots for fish to hide from the current.
2. You can’t feed too much (just clean it up after a couple hours, better water means better hatch rate and more eggs)
3. Feed heavy 4-8 hours before a cold 30% water change.
4. Make sure you have more males than females. You’ll have to think at first when you start sexing cories, but it’ll quickly become something you do automatically. You’ll find that you can actually sex cories accurately at 3 months of age.

Bonus: Have fun! Just remember that you won’t have constant breeding unless you put in effort.

I wish I could help you with the other fish you want to breed, but cories are where my heart are.

Awesome I appreciate that info will definitely give that a go and figure out what I have for males and females. Will update the tanks at the end of the weekend once all fish are moved and settled in.
 

Corydork

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Johnb114 said:
Any specific foods you use for breeding Corydoras?
I’ve tried everything and only use 3 different foods.

Wardley Shrimp Pellets



Omega One Shrimp Pellets



Sera-o-nip tabs (just let them drop to the bottom)



I’ve fed everything from black worms to blood worms and every expensive food there is, and I’ve had extreme success with these foods. Cories aren’t usually very picky about foods to induce breeding, just make sure that they’re over fed and they’ll breed.
 
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Johnb114

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Okay great thanks. Will have to see if my lfs carries any of these.
 

John58ford

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I know they aren't the same but I keep harlequins in a species tank. I have been letting them breed on their own naturally as I am not actually trying to breed them currently. There's at least one pair or of the group laying eggs and dancing upside down under leaves daily. They haven't let a fry make it past 2 days old yet, pretty serious fry eaters. You may have to add a section to your tank just to bring up the fry if you want to be successful. I looked over a quick guide about Galaxy Rasbora breeding and they seem pretty similar in habit as far as fry eating goes.

Pretty cool idea/project you have going. Best of luck with it.

Beautiful tanks by the way I'll be following along as you go :)
 
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Johnb114

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John58ford said:
I know they aren't the same but I keep harlequins in a species tank. I have been letting them breed on their own naturally as I am not actually trying to breed them currently. There's at least one pair or of the group laying eggs and dancing upside down under leaves daily. They haven't let a fry make it past 2 days old yet, pretty serious fry eaters. You may have to add a section to your tank just to bring up the fry if you want to be successful. I looked over a quick guide about Galaxy Rasbora breeding and they seem pretty similar in habit as far as fry eating goes.

Pretty cool idea/project you have going. Best of luck with it.

Beautiful tanks by the way I'll be following along as you go :)
I appreciate the insight. I am hoping the carpet of dwarf chain sword will hide some of the eggs and fry from being eaten.
Is there anything special that you do to encourage the breeding of your harlequin rasboras?
 

CHJ

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Johnb114 said:
Okay great thanks. Will have to see if my lfs carries any of these.
Also take a look at Walmart for the Wardley Shrimp pellets. My wife has been picking them up there for ~3$ a can which is like half the Amazon price.
 

John58ford

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Johnb114 said:
Is there anything special that you do to encourage the breeding of your harlequin rasboras
Not specifically to encourage it but of the things I have noticed/have occurring:

lots of horizontal bushy plants: I grow mostly crypts and swords, my tanks aren't as pretty or dense as yours but I have near a carpet of crypts running around the edge of the tank and a big centerpiece of crypts surrounding 2 different varieties of sword.

I have a ph of 7.4-7.8 seasonally on well water, my water is very soft 3-5d kH/gh. I plant enough that I get near a zero reading on nitrate/phosphate/and hardness weekly before water changes and don't use ferts. My pH does not crash or change over the week. My temperature is 78-80 across the tank in a left to right lazy river, fed by a low pressure rain bar at 4x turnover. They usually go nuts breeding during my morning "twilight lighting" that consists of RGB strips at a low level giving a blue/green hue. This runs for just over an hour before the big lights kick on. I have 12 hours of black out, 1 hour of twilight on each side of moderate high full spectrum for 10 hours. Breeding will continue for about an hour of the full light cycle until they tire out. Typically more pairs will breed the day after I give them a denser meal. Typical feeding is flakes and/or sinking granules once a day; if I give them some betta pellets instead they will almost surely go at it the next morning. (I discovered that because I had a jar of NLS nano pellets I was just trying to get rid of so I started testing it with my community type tanks)

Might be coincidental but those are my observations, might help. I have the turnover turned down in that tank to facilitate bettas, I have had them in and out of there a few times but none have gotten to stay long term yet.
 
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Johnb114

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Thanks for your insight much appreciated, I will keep that in mind. I am on a well also and have similar ph and hardness. I run very similar lighting set up.
 
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Johnb114

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I started moving fish to the the tanks mentioned in original post. Picked up some foam for filter intake sponges at my lfs as well as a nice piece of “tiger wood”.

Ended up having to tear apart the Otocinclus tank to catch 6 loaches before I add the shrimp tomorrow, so that tank got a complete rescape. Also partially rescaped my 33 gallon since the bolbitus was starting to grow out of the water. Once the rotala and moss grow back in should look good.
 

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coralbandit

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What did you do with all that bolbitus ?
It such a great plant ,one of my favorites .
 
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Johnb114

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It’s in with the Otocinclus and soon to be blue velvet shrimp tank. Never tried it until last year and instantly loved it. Was surprised to see how much it grew in a years time with no ferts or co2. I will post a picture of that tank tomorrow once the water clears.
 
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Johnb114

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Traded some loaches and cardinal tetras today for the velvet shrimp. Ended up getting 50 shrimp in the trade.Acclimated the shrimp all morning. At least 15 berried shrimp if not more.
 

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